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Cubase - How to fix bad drummer timing with a lot of bleeding between the tracks?
Old 12th September 2012
  #1
Here for the gear
 
๐ŸŽง 5 years
Cubase - How to fix bad drummer timing with a lot of bleeding between the tracks?

So I got a bad recording of a bad drummer

Almost every kick hit is rushing, and his snare hits are late.
And the bleeding between the tracks is pretty heavy.


For example: because of the bleeding I have to cut all the tracks where the kick is, move the the timing of the kick forward in all of the tracks, and then time stretch them to fill the gap. It sounds pretty bad. (time stretched cymbals = horrible)

Is there a better way to do this?
Old 12th September 2012
  #2
Gear Head
 
Psythe's Avatar
 
๐ŸŽง 10 years
If you have Cubase 6.5 there are vastly easier group editing tools for this. If you don't have that, upgrade to it and look up multitrack drum editing on cubase 6 on YouTube for some tutorials
Old 12th September 2012
  #3
Here for the gear
 
๐ŸŽง 5 years
Yeah I'm saving a little. In about 2-3 weeks i'll have the money.

Can you name the tool names, so when I have it I'll google/youtube them?
Old 12th September 2012
  #4
Gear Head
 
Psythe's Avatar
 
๐ŸŽง 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by GbeTech โžก๏ธ
Yeah I'm saving a little. In about 2-3 weeks i'll have the money.

Can you name the tool names, so when I have it I'll google/youtube them?
Yeah if you type 'cubase 6 multitrack' into YouTube you get all the videos you'd need. Seriously worth the upgrade if you have this sort of work to do.
Old 12th September 2012 | Show parent
  #5
Lives for gear
 
๐ŸŽง 10 years
In 1990 I would have replaced him with MIDI. By 1994 I was sending them home to do it again... crap is crap and it can be re-recorded a lot faster than I can slice and dice it into something worthwhile, plus what I would do would be a lie. Today? I'm about to go on the journey of learning how to use Superior Drummer to re-place crummy drummers again. But the crummy drummer will be me.
Old 12th September 2012
  #6
Lives for gear
 
๐ŸŽง 15 years
When editing drums, it's a pretty standard practice to slip all channels together in order to maintain their phase relationships... this way the bleed between mics is irrelevant and you don't get flaming or phasing between misaligned tracks. In pretty much any version of Cubase, just highlight all the drum tracks, hit control-G, and now any cuts, slips and crossfades you do will apply to all channels.
Old 13th September 2012
  #7
Gear Guru
 
๐ŸŽง 15 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by GbeTech โžก๏ธ
So I got a bad recording of a bad drummer

Almost every kick hit is rushing, and his snare hits are late.
And the bleeding between the tracks is pretty heavy.


For example: because of the bleeding I have to cut all the tracks where the kick is, move the the timing of the kick forward in all of the tracks, and then time stretch them to fill the gap. It sounds pretty bad. (time stretched cymbals = horrible)
when you say bleed between the tracks, you mean bleed between the drums and the guitars, or just within the drum mics?


as 2pulse says, you are supposed to move the drums together. If you are slipping the whole BAND, that creates other problems if the other musicians are in time. If there is bleed between the drums and guitars and you fix the drums and still hear the old drums on the guitar track, then it is time to turn the project back to the band and say "try again".

who did the tracking?

was there a click?

if so, there should be no time-stretching needed. When you slip one note back you just need to extend the front of that region to meet the end of the next region and do your crossfade in the open space between the notes. Just be careful where you place the crossfade, or which 'side' you pull- as if you aren't, you could end up with two kicks - the corrected one and the "old" one.

IOW when you cut up the drums, either piece can be extended front or back - as long as you don't extend all the way to the next note. This is not time-stretching, it is only extending the region into the 'empty' space.

I usually like to do my crossfade as close as possible to the attack of the note as that is where the cymbal has probably decayed the most. And the volume of the note masks the crossfade. However if your drummer was originally early, that crossfade spot would contain the "old" early note on the unmoved track, so you would have to move the crossfade back into the 'space'. I hope that makes sense.
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