Quantcast
Could SSD be the future of long term storage? - Gearspace.com
The No.1 Website for Pro Audio
Could SSD be the future of long term storage?
Old 24th January 2009
  #1
Gear Head
 
🎧 10 years
Question Could SSD be the future of long term storage?

Hi folks. Just curious as to what thoughts and insight anyone may have on the potential use of solid state drives and/or SD cards as a long term storage medium. Currently I have all of my past projects backed up on optical mediums as well as redundant hard drives. I've had negative experiences depending on optical storage after a 10 year mark. And we all know not to trust a hard drive father than we can throw it. Archiving and re archiving my data is getting to be a growing chore. SSD's are just starting to look like an attractive option for many applications. The not too distant future looks as if it will include stamp sized SD cards able to hold a terabyte of data. As it stands, flash memory does not hold up in the long term in R/W situations. However, I have not seen much talk about the potential use for long term storage.. IE: Back your data over to a couple redundant SD cards, or other SSD format and put on a shelf for ten years.... twenty years???? a hundred years???? I dream of a digital archival format that will outlive me. It's a new tech, and we won't really have anyway of knowing for sure until that time has passed, I guess. But I have been searching with no luck for some sort of insight.
Old 24th January 2009
  #2
Lives for gear
 
🎧 10 years
Although there are no moving parts, there are capacitors and resistors which do have a shelf life unfortunately.
Old 24th January 2009 | Show parent
  #3
Gear Maniac
 
wyndrock's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
Ah crap...
Old 24th January 2009 | Show parent
  #4
Gear Head
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alndln ➑️
Although there are no moving parts, there are capacitors and resistors which do have a shelf life unfortunately.
I could see that as being a good point I had overlooked about the SSD drives. What about SD cards? I'm not sure what exactly are inside those.

SDXC - SD Association
I was digging around for info on SSD's and was sent a link to this and found it seriously exiting.
Old 24th January 2009 | Show parent
  #5
Gear Addict
 
🎧 10 years
I think we simply don't know yet.

Most memory cards and SSD are based on a technology called "EEPROM" (Electrically Erasable Programmable Read Only Memory). A similar technology is used for a computer's bios etc., which seems to be very durable in terms of long time storage (infrequent updates).

So, for long time storage, I tend to be optimistic when it comes to memory cards and SSD. For daily work, I think the FAT 32 file system type, which is very popular for "USB sticks", "SD Cards" and similar, is rather counter-productive, as the "File allocation table", a file crucial to find the data on the drive, is on a fixed position and will be overwritten many times, which will eventually destroy the drive. NTFS and the filesystem types that come with Linux and OSX are better in this respect. I am not aware of any precise data like "how often can I overwrite a file on a SSD with NTFS before it dies" but I bet there have been tests and I'd guess the answer is "millions". For FAT, I'd expect around 100000.
Old 26th January 2009 | Show parent
  #6
Gear Head
 
🎧 10 years
Good points about file systems!

My C64 still boots up just dandy. so does my 16mhz 386sx box! my first HD and the first batch of CDR's I made died long ago. This might be what we all been waiting for. It is a least a serious step forword. I'm so exited
Old 26th January 2009 | Show parent
  #7
Lives for gear
 
🎧 15 years
FAT continues to get used because everything can read and write to it.

M$ wont release the NTFS specification and so nothing but windows can reliably write to it. and untill windows can read/write other file systems nothing mainstream will use them.
Old 12th September 2009 | Show parent
  #8
Gear Head
 
🎧 10 years
My DAW is a dedicated windose machine that I keep off line. It's the one way to ensure a stable windose box. Every other machine I use is running Linux. From time to time I need to read data from one system or another. In my DAW I've installed drivers so that the system can read/write with ext2/ext3 file systems. My Linux machines are setup to read/write with NTFS and HFS+. I can handle any data I need to one way or another as is.

NTFS reversed engineered writing end of the Linux driver works fine these days. It has finally gotten to be stable. But you're right, in that I'd rather not depend on a closed sourced file system no matter who holds the code. Though the above comment about windows not being able to deal with other file systems isn't true.

It won't matter what the mainstream uses/sells/buys. Strictly in terms of the file system end of a long term storage solution, I'm starting to think good old ext2 might be the best option for now.
Old 12th September 2009 | Show parent
  #9
Lives for gear
 
1 Review written
🎧 10 years
The only long-term solution that seems viable and that has some built-in redundancy is holographic etching of crystals. A few years off, though.

Superman, anyone? heh
Old 12th September 2009 | Show parent
  #10
Gear Head
 
🎧 10 years
Ha Ha. When I first read that the next standard of SD cards will have a theoretical limit of 2TB, The first thing I thought of was actually the TB and PB crystals from Arthur C. Clark's 2061. And yes... I'll take 3 please. Redundancy is key
Old 12th September 2009 | Show parent
  #11
Lives for gear
 
A440's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by undertone ➑️
The only long-term solution that seems viable and that has some built-in redundancy is holographic etching of crystals. A few years off, though.

Superman, anyone? heh
Now you're talking
Old 12th September 2009 | Show parent
  #12
Lives for gear
 
oudplayer's Avatar
I can't find any simulated longevity tests for SSD. The most likely cause of data loss would be due to charge leaking from memory cells. If there was failure, it would probably be "catastrophic" rather than 1-2 missing files. This has actually happened within the last few years with some SSD drives, so I'd be very wary of assuming that anything you put on a SSD will last more than a year.
Old 12th September 2009 | Show parent
  #13
Motown legend
 
Bob Olhsson's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
The understanding I have is that there is a new generation that will consolidate what we now think of as storage and memory. This is what 64 bit computing is all about.

What's on the market right now is being unloaded and mechanical drives are being blown out.
Old 12th September 2009 | Show parent
  #14
XJR
Gear Maniac
 
🎧 10 years
I've been using SSD drives for a while now and have come across some strange glitchs. One time I couldn't open a PT session so I explored the drive and found there were sessions there but they were older sessions that were archived before the drive was quick formatted for use again! Another glitch is tracking on a clean empty drive is no problem but get to near capacity and the drive slows down for reason.

In terms of normal harddrives I've had no problem working with ten year old drives. They spin up ok and I haven't had any problems with them. At the moment I'm transfering older sessions from 320Gb drives to 1Tb drives, in a few years the 1Tb drives will be copied to 10Tb drives. You need a harddrive to last a few years then copy it across to something new and you should be ok.
Old 13th September 2009 | Show parent
  #15
urumita
 
7rojo7's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
[QUOTE=Bob Olhsson;4571302]The understanding I have is that there is a new generation that will consolidate what we now think of as storage and memory. This is what 64 bit computing is all about.

This seems most logical, 64 bit addressing might solve the full glass problem, or they might have to work as pairs in the end, easy, just make a drive that's already a pair. I wonder what kind of changes they'll have to make to the paths or buss

Anyone know about SD shelf life? I'm considering giving the client backup on these, while I'll store mine on DVD or Waiting for a real BluRay solution, I' figured that this would have become more popular and accessible by now but I only see it in the consumer market and on playstations.
Go figure.
Old 13th September 2009 | Show parent
  #16
Gear Guru
 
2 Reviews written
🎧 10 years
Yeh, the ultimate goal would be have memory and storage be one. That would solve so many issues we have now, though not all of them. You still have to get that memory through the CPU and I/O busses. But the slowest of all was always the permanent storage, so that would remove the weakest link (performance-wise) from the chain.

But that's way different from long term storage. For audio project type stuff, it would seem to me that probably just burning a few copies onto a few DVDs would be your best bet for the medium term. Most projects would easily fit on a DVD. Do a couple just in case. By the time we are far enough out that you'd have to worry too much (i.e. that all three copies will have managed to have gone bad), probably a number of other options will have become available and you can transfer over to something else.
πŸ“ Reply
Post Reply

Welcome to the Gearspace Pro Audio Community!

Registration benefits include:
  • The ability to reply to and create new discussions
  • Access to members-only giveaways & competitions
  • Interact with VIP industry experts in our guest Q&As
  • Access to members-only sub forum discussions
  • Access to members-only Chat Room
  • Get INSTANT ACCESS to the world's best private pro audio Classifieds for only USD $20/year
  • Promote your eBay auctions and Reverb.com listings for free
  • Remove this message!
You need an account to post a reply. Create a username and password below and an account will be created and your post entered.


 
 
Slide to join now Processing…

Forum Jump
Forum Jump