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Bouncing to 16bit or 24bit?
Old 22nd January 2009
  #1
Gear Addict
 
🎧 10 years
Bouncing to 16bit or 24bit?

Do you guys bounce your projects to 44.1/16-bit or 44.1/24-bit. When I bounce to 24-bit I get this weird long line as the audio file when I look at the .wav, even though it plays properly in a mp3 player. When I bounce to audio at 16-bit the .wav image is fine. Is this normal? How do you get it to be a dynamic audio image if you bounce at 24-bit. Is the .wav suppose to end up at 16-bit or something?


When i load the .wav I exported from my sequencer at 24-bit in winamp it shows as 21h kbps 44khz.

When i load an audio file that I chose to export at 16-bit in winamp that has normal .wav image it shows 14h kbps 44khz.

When im saying .wav image im talking about this - >

Wav image by adamh_012 on Photobucket
Old 23rd January 2009
  #2
Gear Guru
 
theblue1's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
Could you rephrase the question?



FWIW, I render my finished mixes as 24 bit and 16 bit. The 16 bit versions are used for mp3s and CDs (on those rare occasions when I burn an audio CD). The 24 bit versions are archived on data CDs or DVDs (as are, for that matter, the 16 bit files).
Old 23rd January 2009 | Show parent
  #3
Gear Addict
 
🎧 10 years
why dont you use the 24 bit version for cd's and mp3s. that might answer my question.
Old 23rd January 2009 | Show parent
  #4
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Susceptor's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
For CDs, because CDs only handle 16 bit; the standard audio CD is 16bit 44100Hz; as for the mp3, I don't know, perhaps it's his choice.

I didn't understand your problem and the image wasn't of much relevance.
Old 23rd January 2009 | Show parent
  #5
Gear Addict
 
🎧 10 years
how about bouncing stems to be mastered later? 16-bit or 24-bit?
Old 23rd January 2009 | Show parent
  #6
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🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by TacosWhenTwisted ➑️
how about bouncing stems to be mastered later? 16-bit or 24-bit?
??? At what resolution is your source file? What is your destination? What exactly are you trying to do?
Old 23rd January 2009 | Show parent
  #7
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Dysanfel's Avatar
 
4 Reviews written
🎧 15 years
I bounce my final 24 bit session tracks to 24 bit. I take my 24 bit tracks to be mastered and let the professionals get it to 16 bit for me.
Old 23rd January 2009 | Show parent
  #8
Lives for gear
 
🎧 10 years
Question

use WMP10/11
and cole2k media pack advanced 7
or
ffdshow.org in soundforge.net

activate in Audio for Windows: support for all uncompressed formats.

you will see ok the wav at 24 bit or more.
or use Quicktime player "has no visualization"
Old 23rd January 2009 | Show parent
  #9
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RockManDan's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
generally the rule is that its better to export as a24bit file so as to provide better headroom and summing quality for your mix, even if your original tracks are 16bit. i have found that especially in older DAW's 16bit summing can make the sound ever so slightly sound less defined and less dynamic. maybe im just crazy, but it could be that the dither engine in your daw is less than perfect, and when combined with the potentially high cpuload of bouncing down a bunch of audio tracks, can compromise the quality and cause truncations of bits, especially when using lots of older plugins.

therefore i prefer to export as a 24bit file, then in soundforge or an audio editor, dither it to 16bit, and use that file for burning to cd and making mp3's. I keep both files for my archives.

since i have been doing this and not bouncing straight to 16bit, i have noticed a perceivable increase in mix clarity.
-dan
Old 23rd January 2009 | Show parent
  #10
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theblue1's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by Susceptor ➑️
For CDs, because CDs only handle 16 bit; the standard audio CD is 16bit 44100Hz; as for the mp3, I don't know, perhaps it's his choice.

I didn't understand your problem and the image wasn't of much relevance.
This should explain why I don't bother with 24 bit for Mp3s:

How accurate are the 24-bit mp3 decoders? (This is an older page. But from some cursory googling, it does not appear that a whole lot has changed on this front.)


Also, a key factor in the practical decision: I create mp3s for distribution so I want them to be usable. Most folks have 16 bit audio devices.
Old 23rd January 2009 | Show parent
  #11
Gear Addict
 
🎧 10 years
Cant a 24-bit .wav be converted to MP3? Why make it 16-bit before turning to mp3?
Old 23rd January 2009 | Show parent
  #12
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theblue1's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
In the past, that has sometimes meant the mp3 encoder truncated your 24 bit signal without adding dither. But even if your mp3 encoder does go out of its way to add dither after truncating, I would rather control that process myself, using my preferred dithering algorithm (which, judging from its proprietary commercial nature, must have cost someone something, so therefore must be of value, no? heh [even if it did come 'free' with the 'deluxe add on' package of my DAW] )
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