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M1 Apple Silicon Experiences in Audio
Old 2 weeks ago | Show parent
  #961
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Lady Gaia's Avatar
Apple Silicon Macs starting with the M1 will never natively run any operating system prior to Big Sur. This is the first operating system compiled for the new CPU's instruction set - including both Apple Silicon and Intel instructions. The hardware cannot directly execute the code that makes up earlier version of macOS. Nor do the earlier macOS releases include device drivers for the GPU or other hardware included in the system that is quite different from its predecessors.

Big Sur does include a hypervisor that acts as a low-level intermediary, making it possible for other operating systems to run on a virtualization layer. They'd still need to be compiled for the M1 and subsequent Apple Silicon hardware.

The last resort is to run an Intel emulator on Big Sur and boot Intel software inside of that. This is how Linux and Windows are run on jailbroken iPads. The software emulator generally has limited access to hardware and runs much, much slower than either native code or Rosetta translations. Nor can Rosetta be used to help here, for reasons I'd happily get into with someone with sufficient technical background if they're curious.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tui ➡️
Isn't it amazing how Apple manage to make things that used to be easy in the past more and more difficult with every new OS.
Among the things they've made more and more difficult are spreading viruses, allowing apps to act maliciously in general, and violating reasonable privacy assumptions. It's not as if they've gone out of their way to make their customer's lives difficult without good reason.
Old 2 weeks ago | Show parent
  #962
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Mercado_Negro's Avatar
 
2 Reviews written
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by trancekid ➡️
Got an email from Soundtoys (because I had issues with their stuff on M1 in the beginning) letting me know that their latest installer 5.3.4 is M1 native now.

There's no info on their site yet, but the installer is in your account.
That's not actually true. No software developer can update their plugins to apple sillicon native if their products are based on PACE protection. At least not yet. PACE needs to make things Apple Sillicon compatible first.

[EDIT] This is PACE statement about Apple Silicon and Big Sur:

Quote:
“PACE technologies including iLok are Rosetta 2 compliant and have been since end of August.

Since August 24th all developers have had access to Eden 5.3.0 SDKs and end-user software. This release includes many enhancements, these include;

iLok Cloud improvements

Service status info for end-users

Big Sur macOS 11.0 and Xcode 12 support

Digital signing of arm64 and universal binaries

Faster logins for large iLok.com accounts

Furthermore, PACE are hard at work on native ARM support and working with all developer partners as they make the transition to new Silicon powered Apple Macs.”
This means iLok plugins are Big Sur compatible but not Apple Silicon yet.
Old 2 weeks ago | Show parent
  #963
Gear Maniac
 
🎧 5 years
Could you or someone else please comment on the speed/performance penalty of doing this?

I'm thinking of buying a M1 Mini with a 2TB internal just for samples and DAW projects ONLY - and keep my BigSur OS + Apps on an external SSD
Old 2 weeks ago | Show parent
  #964
Gear Addict
 
🎧 5 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by dhancaster ➡️
I don't think I would do this.

While I routinely flip boot disks on my older Mac Pro between Mojave and earlier MacOS and Win10, the thing with more recent Mac operating systems and machines is that Apple has shown an increasing disregard for people who go 'off the reservation' with their configuration. There's a lot more assuming going on from Apple, for example in the way that if someone wants to do a local backup of a large capacity iPhone or iPad, Apple still insist on giving you no choice as to where that backup gets placed, so you end up with huge files within your ~mobilebackups folders on the boot disk, even if you had a 12TB HDD you wanted that stuff to go on.

This expectation that Apple has that their users are all the same metrosexual beardy graphic designer who sticks to the rules and barely uses any third party software or utilities is often the cause of headaches when you go off the rails in any way. For this reason I would stick to the internal disk as the boot disk.

Another angle on this I would point out to you - certainly here in the UK, if you change the configuration of the Mac Mini from the 512GB model to the 2TB model you pay £600 for the privilege. If you go have a look at what that buys you in NVME storage, you will find that you can get a high quality 2tb with a good heat dissipating slim thunderbolt enclosure for around £350. So you would save money and honestly for audio purposes, these thunderbolted NVME disks are in the neck of the woods of 2500mb/s speed, not wildly different from the internal storage on the Mac itself. It is not going to be your bottleneck.

And if you do a time machine backup of the OS to a cheap USB disk, then when the unfortunate day comes that the Mac fries itself and you have to use Applecare to get apple to fix or replace the Mac, your important data is on the external disk you still have, and if you get a replacement computer you can use migration tool from your OS USB backup to set up the replacement mac very quickly.
This is kind of a confusing post mate. Insofar as booting the OS, well, Apple supports booting off external media. It has since time immemorial. Thunderbolt is basically PCIe so for all intents and purpose it is like an internal drive. You can enable TRIM support (not supported via USB3 for example) and latency should be as good as internal.

If you're booting off an external drive (fully supported by Apple) the external drive will mount at / (root). The internal drive in that situation becomes just another drive and will mount at /Volumes/<internal drive>. Nothing unusual about this setup. Apple is just another flavor of UNIX (FreeBSD user space). It is Posix compliant. It doesn't care what you boot off or which drive is mounted where. In Unix a drive is just another file/folder. That's all it is. It is mounted somewhere in the filesystem as just another folder and is treated as such.

Backing up is a completely separate issue though. Clone both the external and internal drives using Apples' own Disk Utility and restore till you're blue in the face. I really see no issue here. OS X is as flexible as any other Unix in this respect.
Old 2 weeks ago | Show parent
  #965
Lives for gear
 
🎧 5 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by dfghdhr ➡️
Also, is it possible to boot up from an external drive at all assuming that the OS on said external drive was supported by M1 (let’s say Big Sur)?
Yes of course you can boot into usb or thunderbolt external os. You will have to set the boot options first. I have an external sabrent thunderbolt 3 nvme case including a 4tb nvme ssd attached with a clone of the internal os for troubleshooting.

But regarding performance I would highly recommend using the internal ssd (for macOS at least) as this will give you a better performance in relation to the unified memory system which lets us use big data (sample libraries) in a fast and reliable manner.
Old 2 weeks ago | Show parent
  #966
Tui
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1 Review written
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lady Gaia ➡️

Among the things they've made more and more difficult are spreading viruses, allowing apps to act maliciously in general, and violating reasonable privacy assumptions. It's not as if they've gone out of their way to make their customer's lives difficult without good reason.
Quote:
Originally Posted by dhancaster ➡️
This expectation that Apple has that their users are all the same metrosexual beardy graphic designer who sticks to the rules and barely uses any third party software or utilities is often the cause of headaches when you go off the rails in any way.
Thanks, dhancaster, for posting this. I just didn't have the energy to get into yet another debate about control freakery and authoritarianism.

No one's security - certainly not MY security, as the person who has paid for his machines - is threatened when I make clones of my boot drives, to be used by me and nobody else.

Until about Mojave I think it was, I could simply attach just about any drive to my Mac, open Disk Utility and clone away. On my current 3 Macs that isn't possible anymore. I had to first research and then pay for a backup app, ChronoSync (I know there's also CCC but I don't like it).

So now, if I do buy a M1 Mac, I have to get into yet another backup/cloning routine and buy new 3rd-party hardware to do something that used to be EASY.

Remember the Apple slogan - under Jobs, mind you: It just works? Whatever happened to that? Yeah, it still "just works" so long you're prepared to jump through Apple's hoops.

I don't need handholding and I don't need anyone watching over my "security".

Apple now can - and occasionally has done - shut down people's computers remotely. Your cloud data might very well be read by the Chinese government. I have absolutely no faith in Apple acting in my best interest.
Old 2 weeks ago | Show parent
  #967
Tui
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1 Review written
🎧 10 years
BTW, since I'm still on Mojave with my machines, I had no reason to read up on how things have changed under OS 11.

I just did. What a mind-****.

If I want to continue using ChronoSync, this is what I will have to consider - as opposed to simply connecting any drive and opening Disk Utility, the way it used to be:

https://www.econtechnologies.com/chr...rBootable.html

How is MY security enhanced by any of it? It isn't. All I can see is, Apple is gradually, little by little, seizing control of my machines. They obviously want that I store all my data on their servers so they can decide what to do with it. Not going to happen.
Old 2 weeks ago | Show parent
  #968
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Lady Gaia's Avatar
You can assume it's all a big conspiracy, or you can realize what a gaping security hole it is when anyone with physical access to a laptop could attach an external drive and boot your system from it - granting direct device access to all the system storage for cloning.

Yes, the changes mean that some existing software needs to come up with a new strategy for providing legitimate users with convenient tools they might have offered in the past. That's the very nature of change in the technical landscape and there's really no way around it. Change breaks things. The alternative is to not change anything, and history is littered with technology companies that thought that was a good idea.

... and no, Apple hasn't removed your choice to run the system in less secured fashion. You can still boot from external drives if you choose to reduce the level of system security. You just need an admin password to make that change, and vendors cannot assume that all of their customers will be willing to do so.
Old 2 weeks ago | Show parent
  #969
Gear Addict
 
🎧 5 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lady Gaia ➡️
You can assume it's all a big conspiracy, or you can realize what a gaping security hole it is when anyone with physical access to a laptop could attach an external drive and boot your system from it - granting direct device access to all the system storage for cloning.

Yes, the changes mean that some existing software needs to come up with a new strategy for providing legitimate users with convenient tools they might have offered in the past. That's the very nature of change in the technical landscape and there's really no way around it. Change breaks things. The alternative is to not change anything, and history is littered with technology companies that thought that was a good idea.

... and no, Apple hasn't removed your choice to run the system in less secured fashion. You can still boot from external drives if you choose to reduce the level of system security. You just need an admin password to make that change, and vendors cannot assume that all of their customers will be willing to do so.
To be fair it is considered more or less a truism in the infosec world that physical access wins every time. It is not a gaping security hole. Assumption is physical access isn't readily available and in any threat model this is a reasonable assumption. Krstic migrated a bunch of security concepts from his days at OLPC to the Apple ecosystem and this has improved the overall maturity level but the problem of physical access is not solved yet. We just haven't figured it out yet and as I say the conventional, industry wisdom right now is still "physical access wins". "Secure Boot" is a great effort but it doesn't purport to solve the problems in this space completely. I think the more sensible question to ask here is do you need Secure Boot at all? Answer is probably not for most people doing music. IF someone breaks into your home you got bigger problems than someone booting your machine off an external device.
Old 2 weeks ago
  #970
Gear Head
 
sethg's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
I got my Presonus Quantum 2626 today and had a bit of a headache for a bit trying to make it work. I bought the expensive (something like $130?) 2m thunderbolt cable from Apple to make sure everything worked, but I just got a flashing blue light on the interface and a blank Universal Control app. Turns out you have to go into System > Security & Privacy, then enable kernel extensions, then “Allow” the Presonus extension within 30 minutes of installing system control. Things are working now and the low latency is really nice! Just took some googling...
Old 2 weeks ago | Show parent
  #971
Tui
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1 Review written
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by dhancaster ➡️
There's a good argument that handholding so much can actually create a generation of computer illiterates who know little about the workings of their 'appliances'.

...

...but my experience of MacOS is similar to that of audio software in recent years, that the QA side of developing, testing then releasing the software is absolutely atrocious.
This.

You could call it “a big conspiracy” if you want, but there has been for quite a while a societal movement of collective “dumbing down”. If you are old enough to remember - I am - a world that encouraged all people to strive for excellence in every way possible, you know what I mean.

“Was it possible, I had been hired, not to enlarge children's power, but to diminish it? That seemed crazy, on the face of it, but slowly, I began to realize that the bells and confinement, the crazy sequences, the age-segregation, the lack of privacy, the constant surveillance, and all the rest of the national curriculum of schooling were designed exactly as if someone had set out to prevent children from learning how to think, and act, to coax them into addiction and dependent behavior.”

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dumbing_down

You can tell, typically, the younger a person, the more they are accustomed and DESIRE governments and corporations to make all the big decisions in their life, on their behalf. AFAIAC, they have been brainwashed from an early age into adopting an attitude of compliance and complacency.

Coming back to Apple, it is what authoritarian structures of all stripes do: They tell you that you need to give up your freedom for enhanced security. If you agree to go down this path, ultimately, you will lose both.

Last edited by Tui; 2 weeks ago at 10:51 AM..
Old 2 weeks ago | Show parent
  #972
Tui
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1 Review written
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by asdf ➡️
I think the more sensible question to ask here is do you need Secure Boot at all? Answer is probably not for most people doing music. IF someone breaks into your home you got bigger problems than someone booting your machine off an external device.
Most people - as in 99% plus - don’t need Secure Boot, period. Most people don’t store data on their machines that is worth stealing. Data mining, these days, happens online, there is no need to get hold of physical machines anymore.

The entire security argument is bogus. Just as with the inscrutable and obnoxious file system in iOS which constantly prompts you to store all your data “in the cloud” - an euphemism for corporate servers - the goal is to gradually move control of your data and computing experience from you over to Apple and their corporate/governmental partners.
Old 2 weeks ago | Show parent
  #973
Gear Maniac
 
🎧 15 years
Angry

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mercado_Negro ➡️
That's not actually true. No software developer can update their plugins to apple sillicon native if their products are based on PACE protection. At least not yet. PACE needs to make things Apple Sillicon compatible first.

[EDIT] This is PACE statement about Apple Silicon and Big Sur:



This means iLok plugins are Big Sur compatible but not Apple Silicon yet.
Yeah I could not yet download and try it but on KVR they did and it turns out to be intel only.

The quote in their support email seriously is „M1native“.
Probably their way of saying works with Rosetta
Old 2 weeks ago | Show parent
  #974
Lives for gear
Quote:
Originally Posted by asdf ➡️
IF someone breaks into your home you got bigger problems than someone booting your machine off an external device.
What if you lost your machine?
Old 2 weeks ago | Show parent
  #975
Sky
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1 Review written
🎧 15 years
My biggest concern is that "security for the masses" puts more pressure on developers who serve relatively small professional markets like ours. Each OS release increasingly derails entire business models. Consider how Avid is getting back on its feet, just in time to wrestle with walled gardens, Big Sur and M1 compatibility, just in time to again respond to whatever Apple announces at WWDC. Agile companies can benefit in these transitions, e.g. FabFilter who quickly announced M1 native compatibility.

Sky
Old 2 weeks ago | Show parent
  #976
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Lady Gaia's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sky ➡️
My biggest concern is that "security for the masses" puts more pressure on developers who serve relatively small professional markets like ours. Each OS release increasingly derails entire business models.
The level of disruption varies, but you're right that it can create work. I finally got around to spending a good chunk of a day ensuring that one of my apps met signing and notarization requirements - and it can feel like time wasted, but in practice it also means users of my app are less likely to run malicious code that costs them time and money. So it's something of a tradeoff, though I suspect it's a net win.

Quote:
Consider how Avid is getting back on its feet, just in time to wrestle with walled gardens, Big Sur and M1 compatibility, just in time to again respond to whatever Apple announces at WWDC. Agile companies can benefit in these transitions, e.g. FabFilter who quickly announced M1 native compatibility.
Not every year brings changes quite as big as last year, but it's true that they create both opportunities and obligations for developers. Support for multi-core. The move to 64-bit CPUs. New filesystems to make the most of SSD performance. Enabling hi-DPI displays. Where would we be if Apple didn't make these kinds of changes? Sure, there are also changes that aren't of clear benefit for audio production as well, but realistically the only way to fund operating system development of this sophistication is to serve the needs of a wide range of different users.
Old 2 weeks ago
  #977
Gear Addict
 
2 Reviews written
🎧 10 years
For simplicity I had always done super duper bootable OS updates (one internal/one external)and backups of my audio drives and samples only when I get new samples. Has been a flawless system until now with Big Sur. The OS cannot be backed up via 3rd party at this time. Time machine is not my favourite solution, defaults to backing everything up. I want separate backups on separate drives. I get security of personal info, but security also includes backups!
Old 2 weeks ago | Show parent
  #978
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Ol' Betsey's Avatar
 
1 Review written
🎧 15 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by seclusion ➡️
For simplicity I had always done super duper bootable OS updates (one internal/one external)and backups of my audio drives and samples only when I get new samples. Has been a flawless system until now with Big Sur. The OS cannot be backed up via 3rd party at this time. Time machine is not my favourite solution, defaults to backing everything up. I want separate backups on separate drives. I get security of personal info, but security also includes backups!
Oh sheiße, Really?

I use SuperDuper (nearly) religiously exactly the same way.

Hopefully they come up with a fix.

R.
Old 2 weeks ago | Show parent
  #979
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Ol' Betsey's Avatar
 
1 Review written
🎧 15 years
Damn. This is from the developer of SuperDuper's blog...

"Note that, as I indicated above, M1 Macs can't readily boot from external drives. There are things you can do, if you have an external Thunderbolt 3 drive (USB-C isn't sufficient), but even that won't work if the internal drive is dead. Unless things change, bootable backups are basically a thing of the past on M1-based Macs."

Shirt Pocket Blog

Let's hope things change.

R.
Old 2 weeks ago
  #980
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Chevron's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
I got around to using my M1 MBP for some Pro Tools 2020.11.0 mixing sessions. I froze all but the drum, vocal, instrumental and master buses on my main computer before transferring. The buses only have a handful of plugins, and one session run okay but was close to maxing, and the other wouldn't frequently stall.

I suspect it was Ozone on the master bus making it fall over, but wasn't motivated to try and find out what was causing it. I will wait for more compatibility before I fully jump in.

I've been using the M1 MBP for video editing and general stuff, and it is super slick for those tasks so I am hopeful that at some point it will run some hefty mixing projects.
Old 1 week ago
  #981
Gear Addict
 
🎧 5 years
The tears in this thread, lol.

Bunch of babies!
Old 1 week ago | Show parent
  #982
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bambamboom's Avatar
 
2 Reviews written
🎧 5 years
A little more patience for vendors to catch up their development to natively support the M1 will make all the difference.

As a comparison, my M1 Macbook (16GB, 1TB) performs noticeably better in Davinci Resolve (which is M1 native) than my custom PC running i7-10700k, 32GB, Nvme, Nvidia 1060Ti.

Davinci the way I am running (multcam editing 10+ simultaneous video tracks) is much more of a resource hog than most DAWs and can sometimes overwhelm my 10700k rig, while the M1 crushes it.

If you are a super-heavy VI user time will tell, but for the average user, the M1 should absolutely rock once all of your primary apps are native. I plan to replace the 10700k rig with an M1 Mac mini soon.
Old 1 week ago | Show parent
  #983
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dbjp's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by bambamboom ➡️
A little more patience for vendors to catch up their development to natively support the M1 will make all the difference.

As a comparison, my M1 Macbook (16GB, 1TB) performs noticeably better in Davinci Resolve (which is M1 native) than my custom PC running i7-10700k, 32GB, Nvme, Nvidia 1060Ti.

Davinci the way I am running (multcam editing 10+ simultaneous video tracks) is much more of a resource hog than most DAWs and can sometimes overwhelm my 10700k rig, while the M1 crushes it.

If you are a super-heavy VI user time will tell, but for the average user, the M1 should absolutely rock once all of your primary apps are native. I plan to replace the 10700k rig with an M1 Mac mini soon.
Davinci relies super heavily on GPU rather than CPU (more so than any other video editor IMO), and so your PC would utterly crush the M1 Macbook performance if you could just upgrade your GPU from 1060, even if it had a much slower CPU than a 10700K.
Old 1 week ago | Show parent
  #984
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bambamboom's Avatar
 
2 Reviews written
🎧 5 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by dbjp ➡️
Davinci relies super heavily on GPU rather than CPU (more so than any other video editor IMO), and so your PC would utterly crush the M1 Macbook performance if you could just upgrade your GPU from 1060, even if it had a much slower CPU than a 10700K.
That is what I expected myself, but the GPU for whatever reason isn’t the bottleneck on the 10700k rig, it’s the cpu. CPU hits 100% and I get choppy playback, whereas that same session on the M1 runs smoothly. If I were working entirely in 4K maybe that would be different. Keep in mind these are large Multicam sessions, maybe it’s a bit of a different use case. All I know is that the M1 will have more than enough power for my audio needs, video editing has always been my traditional resource bottleneck.
Old 1 week ago | Show parent
  #985
Lives for gear
 
Intel have sucked for a very long time, particularly for laptops or 'silent' PCs. They have incrementally added more cores and increased the core clock speeds, but they have just kept running hotter and hotter.
For laptops, especially smaller form factor ones, that means severe thermal throttling and performance that can never reach it's full potential.

On a desktop running Intel, the real time processing for the likes of audio is not great either. I can usually only utilize around 40% of an i7 8700 CPU before the Cubase 11 performance meter is in the red, which I am told is a CPU bottleneck.

Again, for a fanless laptop, the M1 Air is ridiculous. Performs like a champ, no laggy behaviour or stuttering, runs cool, and is completely silent.

The only limitation I have run into is the lack of ports, but I have been looking at an OWC Thunderbolt 4 hub which will totally solve that issue.

I bought the M1 Air thinking that it would be great for doing basic tracking on, but it has handled everything I have thrown at it so far, and none of it is even running native yet.
I haven't been able to make it fall over yet in real world use, even when screen capturing and routing everything through Loopback2.

Much more powerful desktop Apple silicon systems are just around the corner, which I am sure will be even more impressive, but I am more than happy with this little M1 Air for what it needs to do.
Old 1 week ago | Show parent
  #986
Sky
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1 Review written
🎧 15 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by soapmak3r ➡️
Intel have sucked for a very long time, particularly for laptops or 'silent' PCs. They have incrementally added more cores and increased the core clock speeds, but they have just kept running hotter and hotter.
For laptops, especially smaller form factor ones, that means severe thermal throttling and performance that can never reach it's full potential.

On a desktop running Intel, the real time processing for the likes of audio is not great either. I can usually only utilize around 40% of an i7 8700 CPU before the Cubase 11 performance meter is in the red, which I am told is a CPU bottleneck.

Again, for a fanless laptop, the M1 Air is ridiculous. Performs like a champ, no laggy behaviour or stuttering, runs cool, and is completely silent.

The only limitation I have run into is the lack of ports, but I have been looking at an OWC Thunderbolt 4 hub which will totally solve that issue.

I bought the M1 Air thinking that it would be great for doing basic tracking on, but it has handled everything I have thrown at it so far, and none of it is even running native yet.
I haven't been able to make it fall over yet in real world use, even when screen capturing and routing everything through Loopback2.

Much more powerful desktop Apple silicon systems are just around the corner, which I am sure will be even more impressive, but I am more than happy with this little M1 Air for what it needs to do.
While studying electrical engineering in the early 1980s, my computer science peers generally agreed that the Motorola 68000 CPU architecture was far superior to Intel 286. But Intel / IBM won the marketing battle and the rest is history.

Arguably Intel's biggest error is not making radical course changes when they had the time and resources to do so. RISC computing (e.g. ARM) has been around for many years; Intel could have launched a parallel R&D effort and evolved gracefully.

Apple deserves much credit for taking big risks when needed. OS9 > Unix/OSX. Motorola > IBM Silicon > Intel > Apple Silicon. Essentially CISC > RISC more recently.

Apple also deserves credit for patiently developing its Apple Silicon platform through several iPhone / iPad iterations. M1 was fully tested and ready for primetime when formally released in Macs last year.

Sky
Old 1 week ago | Show parent
  #987
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bambamboom's Avatar
 
2 Reviews written
🎧 5 years
Intel is making huge investments in their manufacturing facilities currently to try to catch up, but it will take them a couple years at least to start seeing anything outside of the norm to potentially gain back some ground (and this assumes Apple and AMD will remain pretty static during this time, which we know won't happen)

Both Apple and AMD are ahead of them technologically right now, and Intel's value vs performance is not very competitive right now with their new Rocket Lake line (which is still 14nm vs 7nm for AMD 5000 series and 5nm for Apple M1). Even if Intel eventually gets to its next target of 10nm, which has been problematic for them, that's still twice what the M1 is TODAY.

Kudos to Apple for the M1. It's a great piece of engineering and has been very well supported with Rosetta 2 to keep the transition smooth for most users. We have some unique needs in our market requiring some apps to be native, but manufacturer support is gradually catching up in those situations.

Glad to see some competition knocking Intel off of their pedestal. Their loss of the Apple contract surely resonated deep inside their org, that was 1.5+ billion $ per year of loss. Now that's a bad day.

Fierce competition is great for us as consumers.
Old 1 week ago | Show parent
  #988
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Lady Gaia's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sky ➡️
Arguably Intel's biggest error is not making radical course changes when they had the time and resources to do so. RISC computing (e.g. ARM) has been around for many years; Intel could have launched a parallel R&D effort and evolved gracefully.
Like a lot of companies, Intel's failings here have a lot to do with internal power struggles. The bulk of the revenue came from a department that wanted nothing to do with anything that didn't double down on x86, and so they got their way. (See also: Digital Equipment Corporation, Lotus, Polaroid, and any number of similar examples in rapidly evolving fields where companies were their own worst enemies.)

The sad thing is that Intel acquired DEC's StrongARM design in 1997 and failed to follow through. RISC's original advantages over CISC were in transistor counts, but that faded pretty rapidly as transistor density skyrocketed, so Intel engineers seemed to have concluded they could close the door on that evolutionary branch. Unfortunately for them the recent shift we've seen has a whole lot more to do with power efficiency, which was StrongARM's real innovation, as that's tied directly to thermal bottlenecks and battery life which dominate design considerations at the moment.
Old 1 week ago
  #989
Gear Maniac
 
Are the M1 macs handling memory differently? In other words, is 8gb enough for music production? I don't mind paying the extra $200 (well, actually, that's kind of a ripoff) but I've been looking to picked on up on the used market and they are almost always 8gb.
Old 1 week ago | Show parent
  #990
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Lady Gaia's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by neofolk ➡️
Are the M1 macs handling memory differently? In other words, is 8gb enough for music production?
The on-package memory is likely lower latency, effectively faster than conventional motherboard-attached RAM. Otherwise? No. There's absolutely no reason anything on the system would require less memory than an Intel equivalent system. You'll see assertions to the contrary occasionally, but they have no foundation in measurable reality.

You can certainly do quite a bit on an 8GB system. You've got just as much computational muscle as on the 16GB configuration, but with sample libraries in particular you're likely to start swapping pretty easily. That can lead to both extra wear and tear on your internal SSD, and to unexpected clicks and pops resulting from delays in fetching data.
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