Quote:




I am often misunderstood on this point that there is a big difference between "good" songs/recordings and "great" songs/recordings.

the conversation of hobbyists (soundclick) versus pros/labels (itunes) devolves into the argument that even if piracy destroy's all revenue models, "artist will continue to create"... ok, fine, sure... read on...

it just so happens that many of the "great" songs, albums, recordings are also hit recordings by labels - that's not an accident.

sure, artists with day jobs & daws will create, but will they have the support and resources to be THE BEST they can be, to grow and stretch, and evolve into the absolute GREATEST manifestation of their personal creativity?

probably not.

sure, Radiohead's "the bends" was a good, some may say great album, but could they have developed to "OK Computer" and "Kid A" without label support? Unlikely, and just as unlikely as we would have gotten Dark Side Of The Moon from Pink Floyd or Sea Change from Beck, the list goes on and on... Yoshimi Battles The Pink Robots from the Flaming Lips.

It's been said that the enemy of Great is Good, and so it is with artists confined by day jobs, but liberated by DAWS. If you endeavor to create any GREAT art, you will quickly find the greatest expense, and by far, is the cost of man hours in human labor that is required to arrive at GREATNESS through the process of dedication and refinement.

This isn't some subjective "us verses them" argument, anymore than commonly accepted notion that it takes "10,000 hours" to master an instrument.

I started playing guitar two years ago as a man in his forties, if I was 14 I think I could say quite comfortably the man hours I would be able to dedicate to practice would have me playing much better than I do now.

So this isn't a judgment about the capabilities of artists with day jobs and daws as much as it is about the limitations on the artists by needing to have a day job.

Like Muser and Jaron Lanier I would much prefer a world where human creativity is rewarded and theft of human labor is punished... but maybe others would prefer the opposite as it would appear in many of these threads.

Don't Have a Hit? Then Try, Try, Try, Try, Try Again... - Digital Music News

perhaps more to the point, and very insightful post by muser from another thread...

https://gearspace.com/board/5904913-post51.html

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Originally Posted by Muser ➡️
sure lagavulin16. to me it's not that I think that people can't produce great Art with next to nothing.
I think that argument is a defunct argument from go.

but the people with the shoe strings are poised to be eternally with strings in their shoes and I would argue that your argument supports that supposition. even if you don't at all mean to.

The image you paint of the Artists with a good voice, a ****ty guitar, and a great song, is clearly one you are already accepting as being in such a state of affairs that, only having that minimum of freedom, is acceptable.

imo This image entails the giving over of Freedom not the obtaining of it.

in the past, people with good voice, a ****ty guitar, and a great song were usually singing about being able to afford more than a ****ty guitar.

That IS exactly why Art is bound up with Freedom and why any Art lover should respect why any act that kills the Artist may also be Killing Freedom.

Ultimately I envision a world where people will be able to support themselves by creativity and not destruction.
[EDIT 10-31-10]

perhaps I wasn't as clear as I could have been, this post sums up the intent of the original post quite well...

Quote:
Originally Posted by chrisso ➡️
Care to list all the great works of art produced by part timers and amateurs.

'Great art' being that which is both critically acclaimed and has stood the test of time by being loved by the public over an extended period.


Like The Beatles output, Salvidor Dali, Martin Scorcese, Miles Davis and Serge Prokofiev.