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Do Film soundtracks get mastered?
Old 5th November 2010
  #1
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Do Film soundtracks get mastered?

I've done several music audio projects in 5.1 and always got them mastered.

I've gotten hired to mix the entire 5.1 soundtrack for an indie movie; so music, dialog, efx, the works.

Does this get mastered? I was thinking it would, but an engineer friend of mine seemed to think that this was not a process that full soundtracks go through.

Can you ME guys let me know? I'm thinking why not get it mastered? Seems like that's always the best bang for the buck in the audio world. Wouldn't a film soundtrack benefit from the process?
Old 5th November 2010
  #2
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Yes and no. I can't think of an instance where a movie mix has been sent to an engineer in 5.1 audio to be tweaked and sent back to be inserted into the movie. However, movies are often continually remixed under very precise conditions by several engineers. They're also often mixed down to dialogue, effects and music stems for final tweaking. These are often further tweaked in their 5.1 form for authoring to Blu-Ray or DVD.
Old 5th November 2010
  #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rtcstudio ➑️
I've gotten hired to mix the entire 5.1 soundtrack for an indie movie; so music, dialog, efx, the works.

Does this get mastered? I was thinking it would, but an engineer friend of mine seemed to think that this was not a process that full soundtracks go through.

Can you ME guys let me know? I'm thinking why not get it mastered? Seems like that's always the best bang for the buck in the audio world. Wouldn't a film soundtrack benefit from the process?
No, not usually. Full film mixes (intended for the big stage) don't get mastered in the sense that music gets mastered. They are already supposed to be mixed in very controlled and calibrated rooms so they will translate well to cinemas. There are no standards in mastering. There are many strict standards in the film world.

The dub stages where films are mixed, need to be well calibrated and tend to be much bigger than mastering rooms. They are pretty much cinemas themselves. Have a look at this thread to get an idea of what is involved in a serious dub stage: Final construction of the Yellow Box Studio dub stage in Singapore.

There really is no point in bringing a film into a mastering studio that is not in anyway calibrated for film to be mastered by a mastering engineer that is unlikely to have much experience with film mixes. (There are exceptions of course).

A much better idea, and something that many people do when working on a budget, is to do the majority of the mix in your own room and then bring the stems (or the whole mix) to a rented dub stage. Rent the place for a day or two to check that your mix really translates to that kind of setting.

Not doing this is quite risky, your mix might end up way too loud, way to soft or just plain wrong. Or you might get lucky... I guess it depends on your budget and where the film makers think it will be viewing...

You would be much better off asking questions in the Post Production forum than in the Mastering Forum.

Alistair
Old 5th November 2010
  #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rtcstudio ➑️
I've done several music audio projects in 5.1 and always got them mastered.

I've gotten hired to mix the entire 5.1 soundtrack for an indie movie; so music, dialog, efx, the works.

Does this get mastered? I was thinking it would, but an engineer friend of mine seemed to think that this was not a process that full soundtracks go through.

Can you ME guys let me know? I'm thinking why not get it mastered? Seems like that's always the best bang for the buck in the audio world. Wouldn't a film soundtrack benefit from the process?
I just mastered a soundtrack (independent film) for Julian Fauth, a Canadian blues artist, and I've done a few others in the past.

The audio was in stereo and part of the reason they came here is b/c the recording were made in less than idea conditions and all that was available to work on was the already mixed stereo audio.

Of course after doing noise reduction and eq related work to make the dialogue more intelligible and music more balanced (mostly automated), I also ran it through my outboard mastering rig in one pass.

So as I understand it from the other engineer that works here (with an extensive background in post) that the kind of mastering work I did on these projects are not the norm and that all these things are usually taken care of by various editors and engineers involved in the project and are not usually outsourced to a mastering engineer.

When i do these projects, I do follow the industry standard for rms and peak levels so the resulting mastered soundtrack is usually the same level as the original!
Old 6th November 2010 | Show parent
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy Krehm ➑️
I just mastered a soundtrack (independent film) for Julian Fauth, a Canadian blues artist, and I've done a few others in the past.

The audio was in stereo and part of the reason they came here is b/c the recording were made in less than idea conditions and all that was available to work on was the already mixed stereo audio.

Of course after doing noise reduction and eq related work to make the dialogue more intelligible and music more balanced (mostly automated), I also ran it through my outboard mastering rig in one pass.
I have just done two similar jobs: independent 70 minute documentaries where the dialog and music came as separate stereo files. The jobs came through composer whose music I usually master who insisted that the producers take the soundtrack to be "mastered" in a proper studio":Lots of de-noising and creative EQ on the music, plus balancing all the voice & music levels to make it work...I did use some of my mastering chain on the master-bus as the resulting stereo mix was to be dubbed directly onto the film and DVD.

I find it amusing that my credits on these films are for "Mastering" instead of the "Final Mix" that it actually was, thinking that this is bound to confuse people. One of the films looks like it is going to do very well and I am wondering how many film producers will contact me to do "mastering" of their soundtrack. Will this start a new trend or just add to the confusion already present in Hip-Hop or Rap where often artists use the term "mastering" when they in fact mean "mixing"? heh.
Old 6th November 2010 | Show parent
  #6
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I just recently worked on an indie movie here in Miami, where the audio was recorded on location and impropperly, they wanted noise reduction, eq, and compression work done on it. It unfortunately did not do well, nor was there any preparation done for the audio and music work that went into the production. They really should have contracted the actors for ADR work or at least used the correct equipment and techniques for on location recording. I have a feeling that there is not much work for mastering in Movies, especially since most major facilities have propperly constructed post houses. It definately is fun however when a gem comes through. Interesting topic.
Old 6th November 2010 | Show parent
  #7
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Indeed. Unfortunately, most indie movie makers have no clue about audio and they feel like it's too far above their heads to learn anything. A colleague & I tried teaching some local guys but they just don't get why it's important to learn. They believe the free speakers that came with their computers are just fine and that they need to keep everything between 0dB and -6dBFS. They don't use any acoustic treatment on location or experiment with mic placement to avoid hard reflections. There really are no audio guys in the valley that do film/video work. Some directors & camera men own some decent mics but they just hand them to some unknowledgeable friend to somehow instinctively do a good job... and they don't. They won't get an audio specialist to do the post production either, the editors insist on doing it themselves in Final Cut or whatever. I have not once to this date, seen a local production with even passable audio. It's really a shame because there's been some otherwise promising productions.

One guy who fits all the aforementioned criteria at least let me calibrate his computer speakers & headphones to fit the standard -20dBfs RMS = 85dB SPL. I told him to never again adjust the gain of his speakers or head phones and just mix for a comfortable level to the ear. He called me later saying that it was SO MUCH EASIER TO MIX! He still doesn't do very good audio work but he's doing way better than anybody else.
Old 6th November 2010 | Show parent
  #8
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They typically get mastered only for the subsequent release of the soundtrack album. For the actual film, they are delivered mixed, and sometimes as premixes (premix stems, i.e. strings, leads, percussion etc. split out) by the scoring mixer, and then they are mixed into the final mix (into the main music stem) by the music re-recording engineer.

Mastering a score is not all that helpful because one has no idea how it will blend into the final mix once the dialog and effects are blended, and the director (or producer) offers input.

Also, what we often think of as mastering includes limiting, or some other form of significant dynamic range processing which is the antithesis of a film soundtrack, which is required to be very dynamic.

There are level standards in post as well, whether film or TV, but TV is even more restrictive, with no peaks allowed in excess of +10 over 0VU = -20dB FS (which is to say nothing above -10 dB, below Full Scale). Also, the music will be mixed far below that most times since it will be supporting dialog or other action.

A "mastered" CD or soundtrack is way too hot for film, and making EQ decisions without context of the rest of the mix and especially without the monitor EQ (X-curve or similar) and the sound of the dub stage is working blind. It more likely will make the re-recording mixer's job more difficult.
Old 8th November 2010 | Show parent
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Well I master quite a bit of music for film... and the sound FX as well.

I hear what Jay is saying above but over half my business is mastering music for films these days... and major films at that. Not doing any mastering may have been the norm but "the norm" is changing...

Look at the "visual trailer montages" for all these films... every audio element was mastered at Silvertone... and over the course of a few years... I'm surprised they hold up that well together... Robert Etoll Productions - Home Page

Some musical elements appear in the films themselves, some don't.

In fact I mastered all the music for the last Beowulf film. What a great score... over 120K to record that puppy.

I just picked up a film company out of England because of the work I do for Lionsgate, APM, Q Factory, Aspect Ratio, Megatrax, Robert Etoll, etc... Just got done on Friday mastering 128 pieces of music for them... whew! But I love it!

So the answer is both YES and NO!

btw, when Lionsgate contacted me about doing their Masters of the Universe series of movies I yelled at them and said films were way too loud as it is... what the hell were they thinking having this music (and SFX) mastered?... The re-recorder engineers would specify how loud things are in the end... so what the hell are you guys doing??? As they told me their is a "loudness war" on with the film editors themselves (this is a major film production company falling into the trap) and if that their cues weren't loud and impacting they wouldn't get used in the films... so the war rages on... even in films... and all these companies have the same mandate.... "as loud as possible, without adding distortion or changing the sound of any of the musical elements".

Personally when I do this kind of stuff I try to concentrate on keeping the dynamics while making it loud... impact and subtlety... I want to feel the ground shake when something explodes and I want to sense the breeze when the wind blows... this is some of the most difficult work I do... and some of the most fun and tedious all at the same time. It can be loud and have dynamics... to a degree... but that damn ying/yang thing applies still...
Old 8th November 2010 | Show parent
  #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Silvertone ➑️
Well I master quite a bit of music for film... and the sound FX as well...
Interesting! I thought what I had been doing was very unusual for indie films (as they often run out of budget or don't seem to care too much about the final sound), but never thought this mastering process and associated loudness war would already exist in the mainstream!

On the other hand, it would be nice to see "mastering" being used for films to be shown on TV as too often the sound levels are very inconsistent and it drives me nuts having to constantly adjust the sound with the remote control!
Old 8th November 2010 | Show parent
  #11
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Lots of good info here!

The mixing and mastering process almost gets blurred in film work because like it has been stated - the work is done in calibrated rooms, and many engineers work on the projects so the objectivity factor (like in music mastering) is also present, but in a different form.

In my experience working with indie films, Alot of times I will "Master" the audio from stems in my environment. Many times it is because the mixing was done in a sub-par or less than stellar environment (bedroom on laptop or music studio with less than great acoustics).

This way, I'm able to bring balances throughout the sound while retaining the artistic intent of the mixer and producer....much like in mastering for music.

All the best!
Old 8th November 2010 | Show parent
  #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by [email protected] ➑️

On the other hand, it would be nice to see "mastering" being used for films to be shown on TV as too often the sound levels are very inconsistent and it drives me nuts having to constantly adjust the sound with the remote control!
I agree!- especially with Commercials! But this is usually due to the ad companies wanting their commercial's louder than others! Much like the loudness war with music. The idea is that the "louder" the ad sounds, it almost wakes up the listener and gets him to pay attention....how that actually pans out is well...another man's story.
Old 9th November 2010
  #13
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The answer is not "yes and no", it is no.

Music that is not score, but what are called Source Tracks, and is part of a Library or Music Supervision company, may send the tracks to be mastered to a CD or online form. Also, the final sound track as released by the studio is more often than not, mastered. But this is not to say that a film's sound is "Mastered", even if the elements may have passed through this phase before they got to the mixing stage.

The elements of the mix are not "Mastered" and it is a misnomer to say so. All the elements of Dialgue, Production Effects, Edited sound FX, and all music (included pre-recorded Source and Score) is give to a mixer or team of mixers and it is "Re-Recorded". That is, it is re-recorded to another medium (Dubber, File-based) and part of that process is "mixing". This why, in the states, they call these people Re-recording Mixers. A person working in a Music Mastering room adjusting music, reducing noise, adjusting relative levels of elements, etc. is not "Mastering" in any accepted sense of the term in film parlance. You are, as the saying goes, "mixing". Even if the music from the music library source passed through a Mastering Studio, the Re-recording Mixer will most certainly adjust it in any number of ways.

As Undertow points out, a film is often mixed in rooms that are simulacra of a movie theaters. As he also suggests, mix it in your room, then take the stems to a Dolby-Approved Dub Stage and work with the mixer there to adjust the mix to the proper levels.

While I find it amusing that someone calibrated computer speakers and headphones to 85 SPL, it is not correct practice for a small room and being 2 feet from your speakers, let alone against your head. You will be very disappointed and surprised when it is played back in a properly calibrated Dub Stage.
Old 9th November 2010 | Show parent
  #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by minister ➑️
The answer is not "yes and no", it is no.

Music that is not score, but what are called Source Tracks, and is part of a Library or Music Supervision company, may send the tracks to be mastered to a CD or online form. Also, the final sound track as released by the studio is more often than not, mastered. But this is not to say that a film's sound is "Mastered", even if the elements may have passed through this phase before they got to the mixing stage.

The elements of the mix are not "Mastered" and it is a misnomer to say so. All the elements of Dialgue, Production Effects, Edited sound FX, and all music (included pre-recorded Source and Score) is give to a mixer or team of mixers and it is "Re-Recorded". That is, it is re-recorded to another medium (Dubber, File-based) and part of that process is "mixing". This why, in the states, they call these people Re-recording Mixers. A person working in a Music Mastering room adjusting music, reducing noise, adjusting relative levels of elements, etc. is not "Mastering" in any accepted sense of the term in film parlance. You are, as the saying goes, "mixing". Even if the music from the music library source passed through a Mastering Studio, the Re-recording Mixer will most certainly adjust it in any number of ways.

As Undertow points out, a film is often mixed in rooms that are simulacra of a movie theaters. As he also suggests, mix it in your room, then take the stems to a Dolby-Approved Dub Stage and work with the mixer there to adjust the mix to the proper levels.

While I find it amusing that someone calibrated computer speakers and headphones to 85 SPL, it is not correct practice for a small room and being 2 feet from your speakers, let alone against your head. You will be very disappointed and surprised when it is played back in a properly calibrated Dub Stage.
Whereas I understand what you are saying completely... hence my screaming at Lionsgate for hiring me... I do master the music elements that appear in the films... and I have a dedicated Mastering facility... not a sound stage...

The OP asked the question if the "soundtracks" get mastered (not the film itself) and the answer to that is... sometimes!

I mastered the whole score for Beowulf (it's considered the films soundtrack)... so was the music mastered, yes, was it placed in the film, yes... was the mix with the final elements done by a re-recording engineer (as stated above), yes, they all are.

So the question is Do film soundtracks get mastered?... If we take into account Beowulf above than the short answer would be yes, they do. Just because the music or SFX gets re-recorded it doesn't DISCOUNT the work done before hand. If the score was mastered... it was mastered...

Hence my answer of both yes and no...
Old 9th November 2010 | Show parent
  #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Silvertone ➑️
The OP asked the question if the "soundtracks" get mastered (not the film itself) and the answer to that is... sometimes!
This is where the confusion stems from. The OP wrote: "I've gotten hired to mix the entire 5.1 soundtrack for an indie movie; so music, dialog, efx, the works." In other words, the whole mix. Not just the music.

Alistair
Old 9th November 2010
  #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Silvertone ➑️
....

The OP asked the question if the "soundtracks" get mastered (not the film itself) and the answer to that is... sometimes!

Hence my answer of both yes and no...
Larry,

You seem to just want the answer to be yes. But it is no. Re-read the original post.
Quote:
Originally Posted by rtcstudio ➑️
I've done several music audio projects in 5.1 and always got them mastered.

I've gotten hired to mix the entire 5.1 soundtrack for an indie movie; so music, dialog, efx, the works.

Does this get mastered?
No. It get's mixed.


Also, even though, as I explained clearly in my post, that you have "mastered" music before it goes into the mix,. the re-recording mixers will, among other things: turn the track down, EQ it, compress it, and even "upmix" it, or pan it to the surrounds. Really, what you are doing is processing the music before it goes into the film, you are not making the final PMCD or a Master that represents the final form or even sound of the files (unless you are doing the soundtrack release CD).

You also miss my point about working in a Mastering Suite. Some posters said they work on films in their suites. Just b/c you are in a mastering suite and you take the elements of a mix and EQ and noise reduce the dialogue, you are not Mastering the Film entire soundtrack, you are mixing.
Old 10th November 2010 | Show parent
  #17
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Look, I was just answering the title question... I guess i should have read the whole post... my bad.

So the answer is NO to the whole original question.

That said what I am doing is assuredly mastering... not mixing. I don't care if someone changes the elements afterward when they post it to the film... I got paid to MASTER, not mix... in the 1980's I got paid to MIX for film... now I get paid to MASTER... so please don't tell me I don't MASTER elements in these films when clearly I do!

So NO, whole films do not get mastered... but the music elements in them sometimes do (and more and more this IS becoming the norm).
Old 10th November 2010 | Show parent
  #18
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film, usually not

broadcast, hell yes.....unless someone wants to get fired/fined

where that line is drawn these days, that's the tough one to call...

is the internet a broadcast or a film

is netflix streaming a broadcast? I am not touching that with a 60 foot pole

Old 12th November 2010 | Show parent
  #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Silvertone ➑️

That said what I am doing is assuredly mastering... not mixing. I don't care if someone changes the elements afterward when they post it to the film... I got paid to MASTER, not mix... ....
I have to agree with Tom Hambleton...... you're not mastering - you're mixing and processing audio.

Old 22nd September 2017 | Show parent
  #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Silvertone ➑️
I mastered the whole score for Beowulf (it's considered the films soundtrack)... so was the music mastered, yes, was it placed in the film, yes... was the mix with the final elements done by a re-recording engineer (as stated above), yes, they all are.

So the question is Do film soundtracks get mastered?... If we take into account Beowulf above than the short answer would be yes, they do. Just because the music or SFX gets re-recorded it doesn't DISCOUNT the work done before hand. If the score was mastered... it was mastered...

Hence my answer of both yes and no...
Larry, are you really trying to convince people that you took Dennis Sands' final 5.1 stems of Alan Silvestri's score for Beowulf and "mastered" them in your stereo mastering room before they were sent back to the dub to be mixed into the film?

At best this is misinformation, at worst you are flat out lying and deceiving people here that you mastered the score for this film before it went to the dub.

I took a peek at the IMDb for the film and the All Music page for the soundtrack and found no trace of your name. I even discovered that there is an entirely different mastering engineer listed on the credits for the soundtrack so I'm really not sure what in the hell you're talking about.

Perhaps you mastered some of the music used in the trailer for a trailer library? Perhaps you are considering samples you mastered for Etoll to mean that you mastered the entire score?

For anyone stumbling across this old post as a composer recently has, please do not be deceived into believing that scores are sent to a mastering engineer before being delivered to a film dub. In the realm of major motion pictures and television shows, this would be a highly unusual and rare situation, if it even has ever happened on a major production.
Old 22nd September 2017
  #21
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I MASTER music that get used in movies and television all the time.

Yes, it gets remixed at post but it doesn't change the fact I enhanced the score. Yes mastering is not only for volume, sometimes you really need to work on the elements of the piece.

I was told Veigar Mendleson composed the soundtrack that was used in Beowulf, the work he did was scored at Abby Road. I was given the full score. Months later ( as always) I was told this was used as the score in Beowulf. BTW I was the second mastering engineer to master this. I got paid 3K the first guy got 4K, so 7K for mastering total.

I have since found out that these scores were used to promote the film only. At the time I was told it was the main theme. Apologies to all for any misinformation I may have given or spread.

Have fun everyone.

Silvertone Mastering

Last edited by Silvertone; 24th September 2017 at 12:41 AM.. Reason: Correction
Old 22nd September 2017 | Show parent
  #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Silvertone ➑️
I MASTER music scores that get used in movies and television all the time.

Yes, it gets remixed at post but it doesn't change the fact I enhanced the score. Yes mastering is not only for volume kids, sometimes you really need to work on the elements of the piece.

Veigar Mendleson composed the soundtrack that was used in Beowulf, I was told they scored it at Abby Road. I was given the full score. Months later ( as always) I was told this was used as the main score in Beowulf. BTW I was the second mastering engineer to master this. I got paid 3K the first guy got 4K, so 7K for mastering total. So I guess you guys that weren't involved know everything.

Believe whatever you want. I'll keep cashing the checks.

I am done defending myself. This is the reason GS looses professionals all the time.

Have fun everyone. I'm done!

Silvertone Mastering
Larry, given that your list of film clients on your website are predominantly production and trailer libraries (Megatrax, APM, Audiomachine, Elephant Sound Design, Robert Etoll), I would believe you if you stated that you mastered music for libraries that often get placed in TV shows, trailers, and very occasionally films.

For you to be telling young composers on this forum searching for insight into the production process of major motion pictures that you regularly master original scores before they get sent to a dub is pure deception. I work almost exclusively in the Recording, Mixing, and Production of Film, Television, and Video Game scores and know most of the older, major engineers here in Hollywood. This mastering process simply does not happen and I really wish you would stop trying to spread misinformation.

I also hate to break it to you, but your client Veigar Mendleson must have lied to you when he said he composed the music for Beowulf back in 2007. I can't even find him by googling his name (I even tried spelling variations of his name), much less on IMDb or in the film's credits. Where is there any proof that the extensive evidence that Silvestri composed the score is false?

Here's an interview with Alan about working on the score:

A Year of Living Wonderfully: Interview with Alan Silvestri

Here's the IMDb page for Beowuf:

Beowulf (2007) - IMDb

No mention anywhere of you or this Veigar Mendleson having worked on this film.
Old 22nd September 2017
  #23
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Yes, Phil and others in this thread are correct.

All one needs to do is pop over to the audio post forum here on GS and talk to some of the re-recording mixers there. If any of them ever got a score that was mastered they would most likely kick it back and as for it to be redone. If not, then they would have to turn the score down significantly.

The licensed music that is used in a film either as source or as additional score (like a famous song from a famous band, or an EDM track in a night club, or a jazz trio playing in the background of a bar, etc) is usually mastered before it is released to the world for potential licensing.

But the orchestral film score is not mastered before being mixed by the re-recording mixer in the film. The score is mastered by a mastering engineer for the commercial retail release of the film's sound track album/CD that you can buy at stores or on iTunes or listen to it on spotify.

What you hear in those instances is not the actual score as it was in the film, but you hear a mastered version for commercial release. Depending on how the music was mixed, sometimes the mastering engineer gets just the music without any dialogue or sound effects and masters that (Alan Meyerson makes a stereo mix of the score of every film separate from the 5.1 mix specifically for use as the Soundtrack CD/Album and that is what gets sent to mastering. He usually requests it be sent to Gavin Lurssen for mastering). Other scores do not have a stereo mix of just the music, so the film studio ends up taking the stereo fold down of the final print of the film that includes dialogue, SFX and Music and they have a music editor cut into and out of the musical pieces they want included on the soundtrack album. In those cases you will hear dialogue and sound effects mixed in with the music (I noticed the recent Disney Beauty And The Beast soundtrack album is like that).

But any mastering done by a mastering engineer is always for commercial soundtrack album release.

When films are mixed on a dub stage, as Undertow and others have mentioned, there are strict standards and specifications for how the film is mixed. And after the film is mixed, people from dolby come in and make the dolby master from the final mix stems. So technically THAT is the mastering that happens on all films. But it is always done by Dolby staff (if using Dolby encoding) and the re-recording mixers will sometimes have to tweak the mix for the dolby engineers as they are printing the final dolby print master.
Old 23rd September 2017
  #24
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Yes, there is a final "mastering" stage where the final mix stems are adjusted for different theatrical formats. This is usually performed by the rerecording mixer.

As for scores, stems are appropriate if you care about quality because final balance decisions must be made on the stage and eq. "fixes" will not sound nearly as good as minor rebalancing with faders.
Old 23rd September 2017 | Show parent
  #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Olhsson ➑️
Yes, there is a final "mastering" stage where the final mix stems are adjusted for different theatrical formats. This is usually performed by the rerecording mixer.

As for scores, stems are appropriate if you care about quality because final balance decisions must be made on the stage and eq. "fixes" will not sound nearly as good as minor rebalancing with faders.
for films - and film score - it is NOT called "mastering"

It is called re-recording. Slang in USA is dubbing.

It is always done by the re-recording mixer

lets not confuse inexperienced people!

Old 23rd September 2017 | Show parent
  #26
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Silvertone's Avatar
 
Verified Member
1 Review written
🎧 15 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by mixerguy ➑️
for films - and film score - it is NOT called "mastering"

It is called re-recording. Slang in USA is dubbing.

It is always done by the re-recording mixer

lets not confuse inexperienced people!

Exactly.

There is confusion here as we are talking two different process.

That said, don't think that stuff doesn't get mastered prior to it being sent to the re-recording engineer as I have mastered music that is placed in tv shows and movies for all these companies... so I still argue the answer is yes and no.

http://www.lazybones.com/placements

www.silvertonemastering.com
Old 23rd September 2017 | Show parent
  #27
Gear Guru
 
Brent Hahn's Avatar
 
1 Review written
🎧 15 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by Silvertone ➑️
Exactly.

There is confusion here as we are talking two different process.

That said, don't think that stuff doesn't get mastered prior to it being sent to the re-recording engineer as I have mastered music that is placed in tv shows and movies for all these companies... so I still argue the answer is yes and no.
Seems counterintuitive, maybe, but I think any re-recording mixer will say that an unmastered (uncompressed) score is far easier to deal with in a mix than a score that's been squashed into boxcars.

So many music libraries are limiting their stuff to death now, and for the end user it just sucks.
Old 23rd September 2017
  #28
Motown legend
 
Bob Olhsson's Avatar
 
Verified Member
🎧 15 years
It most certainly was called "print mastering" on the Skywalker dub stages when I was working there as an assistant sound editor. I can't say about elsewhere but both our re-recording mixer and my boss called it "print mastering" and each has previously worked in Hollywood and won several Oscars. Yes, it is the final stage of the re-recording process.
Old 23rd September 2017 | Show parent
  #29
Motown legend
 
Bob Olhsson's Avatar
 
Verified Member
🎧 15 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brent Hahn ➑️
...So many music libraries are limiting their stuff to death now, and for the end user it just sucks.
Getting past a music supervisor is probably a lot like getting past a broadcast music director or a music reviewer. That's the only reason CDs are smashed.
Old 23rd September 2017
  #30
Lives for gear
 
Sharp11's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by rtcstudio ➑️
I've done several music audio projects in 5.1 and always got them mastered.

I've gotten hired to mix the entire 5.1 soundtrack for an indie movie; so music, dialog, efx, the works.

Does this get mastered? I was thinking it would, but an engineer friend of mine seemed to think that this was not a process that full soundtracks go through.

Can you ME guys let me know? I'm thinking why not get it mastered? Seems like that's always the best bang for the buck in the audio world. Wouldn't a film soundtrack benefit from the process?
Classic example of a term being corrupted and attaining a new meaning: "mastering" means to prepare a master, from which copies will be made - and although compression and eq is often part of the process, it's not the sole purpose.
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