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Metallica and Rick Rubin win Grammy's for "Death Magnetic"
Old 10th February 2009 | Show parent
  #31
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Waltz Mastering's Avatar
 
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1 Review written
🎧 10 years
  • The Loudness War Is Over - If We Want It
  • -----
  • Producer Of The Year, Non-Classical
  • ----
  • Rick Rubin
    • Death Magnetic (Metallica) (A)
    • Home Before Dark (Neil Diamond) (A)
    • Mercy (Dancing For The Death Of An Imaginary Enemy) (Ours) (A)
    • Seeing Things (Jakob Dylan) (A)
    • Weezer (Red Album) (Weezer) (A)
    -----
5 albums in 2008 - Not to Shabby

TW
Old 10th February 2009 | Show parent
  #32
Mastering
 
🎧 15 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by starfighter ➑️
Maybe it should have... At least that album has more dynamics...

And it must have been one of the most anticipated albums ever
But we can't make judgments based on meter excursions, much as we would like to. Judgments for the Grammys are based on:

1-- luck luck luck

2-- hearsay and marketing. It didn't hurt that TBone is very popular and lots and lots of articles have been written about "Blood and Sand" which probably only 10% of the people who voted have actually heard

3-- Who deserves it? In the case of Album of the Year, Robert Plant didn't win any Grammy's during his heyday, did he? I certainly would like to see the man get something for his distinguished career! Even if it's for an Americana album 10 years later. Paul Newman didn't receive any Oscar wins for his many years of great performances in his youth, until "The Verdict" (if I recall correctly) much later on in life.

4-- block voting (especially on the part of any given record company)

5-- and sometimes, but fortunately often enough, on talent and skill and musicality

It's not a fair world. I'm glad that Blood and Sand won, even though I personally don't like the distorted sound of this record, musically it's a very nice, beautiful adventure. As for Rubin, I don't have an opinion on his body of work as a producer, I'm not familiar enough with it all to make a judgment. And how many people voting for any category actually heard ALL the entries to make a fair, unbiased (if possible) judgment.
Old 10th February 2009 | Show parent
  #33
Gear Maniac
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by Neon Heart ➑️
I've never had any respect for the Grammys. fuuck
a whole lot of awards for dumb music.
the grammmys are one of the reason our ears get slaughtered by stupid fcuking crappy music all the time.

I feel vindicated.

agreed! 100%
Old 10th February 2009 | Show parent
  #34
Lives for gear
 
🎧 10 years
What are the requirements to take part in the Grammy's?
Is it true you have to send 300 CD's when entering?
Why, if they don't listen to them?
Old 15th February 2009 | Show parent
  #35
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ToddF's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
I don't claim to know everything about the Grammy process but I have been a voting member for 10 years and am on the Board of the Chicago chapter.
I joined to make a difference so I encourage anyone who doesn't like the winners, process etc. to join and vote. Trust me I don't agree with many of the nominees and winners.
Here is some info about the process. Sales or chart position does not have anything to do with how a winner is decided. It is voting member's votes and that is all. We are able to listen to entries via Itunes.

The Grammy awards are a small part of NARAS. Musiccares provides healthcare and other monitary needs to down and out musicians. The Grammys also lobby for legislation to keep music education in the schools, fights for the rights of artists to get proper royaties for their songs etc.

Some info. GRAMMY.com
GRAMMY.com


Peace Todd
Old 17th February 2009 | Show parent
  #36
Gear Nut
 
🎧 10 years
I really quite like the album itself, some very solid songs on it in my opinion, best thing I've heard from them probably since the justice album. HOWEVER.... sonically it's an f'ing nightmare. I can dig they eqing etc, very dry in your face sound, that's fine, however the clipping all through the album from it being brickwalled so much is extremely obvious, it's really kindergarten audio 101 stuff.
Old 17th February 2009 | Show parent
  #37
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James Meeker's Avatar
It's moments like these that I despise the mainstream music industry and realize that, despite his faults, Steve Albini has the right attitude about things.
Old 18th February 2009 | Show parent
  #38
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🎧 15 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by doorknocker ➑️
Why not have Gearies? Gearslutz awards!
If this happens and they're not called "Sluttys", a golden opportunity has been missed.

"Look mom, I got myself a Slutty!"
Old 19th February 2009 | Show parent
  #39
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Benmrx's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
Wow............I'm REALLY out of touch with mainstream music / pop culture.
Old 20th February 2009 | Show parent
  #40
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BlackBeauty's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
I am not surprised at all of it. Who else could win the Grammy?hehheh
I was a fan of Metallica, now i like but not as years ago...of course i went to the store to get a death magnetic copy...when listening to in my monitors i quickly noticed somethind was distorted.
At a first "ear" i heard the drums very distorted...and i did not attached much importance to it. Later reading in here i found som threads about it...everybody claimed it as a shocking...how the hell Rubin is named a producer!!!...it sounded much better before mastering!!!...and so on...it must be a cd burning mistake...or something...
Then i checked it out furhter and I realised all is distorted, i do not really like and i wouldn't master some like that (if i couldhehheh)...then comparing with other albums also i realised of...what the hell....such a sound smashes any other metal band album indeed...whichever...it sounds louder, more impact, not to much in face to result so agressive but every intrument high in mix but still keep the scenary...all my friend fans of metallica go crazy when listening to...
Anyway i think it would have the same mass impact and good sound even not adding distorsion...i think is a current paranoid as last time, using a can instead of a snare. St. Anger would sound the same practically with a rock snare instead of a can, and they did it even taking the risk of being criticized, of course it was like this, lot of sold copies, recorded a movie...grammy and etc...someone cares about it??
Next album, next paranoid, i think it is not by accident..

The case is...who decides this...Metallica members (hetfield-lars) or the producer got the wounderful idea suddenly??

Anyway who cares about these awards??? ManΓ‘ always wins lot of prizes, and everybody likes it (more or less, u kow what i mean)...but i can guess more really rock bands much better..what i say...further much much better hehheh...but no so spread in radio....
Old 20th February 2009 | Show parent
  #41
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lucey's Avatar
 
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1 Review written
🎧 15 years
Music Award = oxymoron ?
Old 20th February 2009 | Show parent
  #42
Mastering
 
🎧 15 years
I should start another thread, but here's a logical extension of the argument:

When does good distortion become bad? When each generation of "hard rock/metal music" is more distorted than the previous, when do you draw the line? Even my tastes and tolerance for distortion has changed over the years due to accomodation.

Black Sabbath, "War Pigs" 1977, radical then, very "tame" now. This issue alone makes it very difficult to talk about distortion as a bad thing. I'm not saying that I don't have my opinions (very strong ones) and I do believe that I "know" what too far is. But if I am realistic with myself, I also know that what I consider "acceptable" today in a certain genre would shock my ears of 20 years ago!

Is everything relative? Have we reached a point of "enough already"?

---------
Now let me be the first to answer my own questions! The loudness race is part of the reason for the extreme distortion that abounds in mastered music of today as opposed to the more gradual "analog" loudness race of yesterday. As engineers we can often distinguish between distortion that was created by the loudness race and distortion that was created for taste. I've developed a measurement system and an explanation for what caused the accelerated "digital" loudness race and methods to evaluate music that was mastered in response to the loudness race and without regard for sound quality. But because of the subjective variance and relativity of "what is distortion" we would have to use measurements in order to help decide what is "good" and what is likely "bad". Regardless, somewhere, someone will get pissed when one of his products is labelled "bad" by what appear to be arbitrary standards on our part.

For example, it can be shown that the vast majority of well-recorded popular music since 1950 has a crest factor (measured flat and to absolute 1 sample pleak) of about 14 to 12 dB. Anything less we could call "unacceptable" or distorted, and since it encourages the loudness race, should not be peak normalized or it would accelerate the race. That's about the only objective standard we can apply, for who can pronounce that the Metallica album is unacceptably "distorted" when it could be considered as just another milestone in the progression of distortion since the year of the invention of the electric guitar.
Old 20th February 2009 | Show parent
  #43
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tengu's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
To the ME's

This quetion is for all of the ME's in here who could now or possibly in the furture envisage being asked to master this or a similar project.

If Rick Rubin and Metallica and/or some equally big time producer/act bought in an album akin to this Metallica album, would you say no and ask them to mix it again?

What would you do?

I keep reading about this loudness wars. I imagine this was a trend set in mainstream music i.e. big time bands and acts.

Haven't acts always given their music to ME's who are the goto guys, the established professionals.

Not pointing fingers or anything, but everyone is aware of this situation.

Why did Rick Rubin mix it like this?

Aren't we all responsible?
Old 20th February 2009 | Show parent
  #44
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Waltz Mastering's Avatar
 
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1 Review written
🎧 10 years
1989 - 2009 This is the standard now. Can you guess which is which?

If you listen to modern rock radio there are no dynamics anymore - pretty much flatline.....

TW
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Old 20th February 2009
  #45
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thethrillfactor ➑️
Metallica wins the Grammy for best Metal Performance and Rick Rubin for Producer of the Year.

I called it months ago in this thread:

Death Magnetic

Its the Naras members that voted which includes alot of technical people including us.

It goes on to show that nobody cares or not enough to make the differences needed.
That is truly obscene.
Travesty does not even begin to describe this.
Old 28th February 2009 | Show parent
  #46
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DJamesGoody's Avatar
 
2 Reviews written
🎧 15 years
Rubin's process isn't even one that constitutes being called a producer. Sorry, but his whole schtick is a joke. He's a suit in a shaman's clothing..... he walks around twisting his mala beads, and suddenly he's the wise producer?

Please.
Old 28th February 2009 | Show parent
  #47
Lives for gear
 
🎧 10 years
Here is another laudible attempt at reigning loudness in Download | DYNAMIC RANGE | pleasurize music!


One of the things that sucks hard is that If some one wants some of those classics bob was refering to, then they have to go through allot of hell to get the older releases because if you order up a New one , you'll get a "re-master" .......well , you know what you get .

So not only are we fking up the new stuff , but were going back and fking up the old, classic stuff too !!
Old 28th February 2009 | Show parent
  #48
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Pryzefighter's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Metallica - AC/DC - Rubin and the loudness wars

Seems to me that the larger question behind the loudness wars and production values has to do with the music you are recording and what the intended target for it is. If you want your music blasted out on a clear channel station with a bunch of 15 - 20 year olds banging their heads in the car or groping each other up in some frathouse then I think most modern producers are hitting their mark. Most of the "rock" or more truthfully commercial music these days is either club groove with a washed out bassline or some dinky hammer a guitar and act tough sh!t. How else do you record that? You want to compete with all the other trashing crap on the radio then you need to be at the same level of loudness as the DJ and commercials and all the dfegadpu$$y a$$ wannabe punk bands. Metallica and AC/DC and their ilk are rightfully respected for the mark they left on rock - 20 years ago. Now they are milking that same cow until it's tits fall off. They already made clear to everyone during the napster fiasco - the main thing they care about is the cash and not the art.... so go figure. Rubin is a great producer, but a good business man as well. If he thinks he needs the money or recognition then I can't blame him. In his defense though if you go back and look at the work on Wildflowers, or any of the Cash albums it is clear that he can produce pure art that is soaked in dynamics. The mainstream today is a little less than that.
_________________________
"You can't polish a turd; and if you try you get dirty hands."
Old 28th February 2009 | Show parent
  #49
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1 Review written
🎧 15 years
Good post, welcome to the forum.
Old 28th February 2009 | Show parent
  #50
Gear Addict
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pryzefighter ➑️
Seems to me that the larger question behind the loudness wars and production values has to do with the music you are recording and what the intended target for it is. If you want your music blasted out on a clear channel station with a bunch of 15 - 20 year olds banging their heads in the car or groping each other up in some frathouse then I think most modern producers are hitting their mark. Most of the "rock" or more truthfully commercial music these days is either club groove with a washed out bassline or some dinky hammer a guitar and act tough sh!t. How else do you record that? You want to compete with all the other trashing crap on the radio then you need to be at the same level of loudness as the DJ and commercials and all the dfegadpu$$y a$$ wannabe punk bands. Metallica and AC/DC and their ilk are rightfully respected for the mark they left on rock - 20 years ago. Now they are milking that same cow until it's tits fall off. They already made clear to everyone during the napster fiasco - the main thing they care about is the cash and not the art.... so go figure. Rubin is a great producer, but a good business man as well. If he thinks he needs the money or recognition then I can't blame him. In his defense though if you go back and look at the work on Wildflowers, or any of the Cash albums it is clear that he can produce pure art that is soaked in dynamics. The mainstream today is a little less than that.
_________________________
"You can't polish a turd; and if you try you get dirty hands."
How come if a band is concerned with music being stolen they don't "care about the art"?

Even if its simply caring for their own hides as far as losing money goes, the fight against it protects the smaller guys who lose money because of piracy.
Old 1st March 2009 | Show parent
  #51
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Pryzefighter's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Money for Nothing - Checks for Free

Quote:
Originally Posted by somsto75 ➑️
How come if a band is concerned with music being stolen they don't "care about the art"?

Even if its simply caring for their own hides as far as losing money goes, the fight against it protects the smaller guys who lose money because of piracy.
I understand the argument but I think it falls short. Seems to me that there are plenty of opportunities for artists to make money besides letting the record industry be their pimp. The heart of the issue is the record industry, which as David Byrne said is thankfully in it's death throes now. People used to be able to buy records for five bucks, even in the eighties, then with CD's record companies thought they had a proprietary gold mine and began a gradual rate hike that has ended in some new albums costing more than $15. If CD's were more reasonably priced then more people would buy them. I download A LOT of music and still spend a lot on CDs and records. Like thousands of dollars in my life. My take on digital music is that people who listen to the top ten aren't really that into music and aren't going to have extensive libraries anyway. I think the highly positive side of music distributed online in any form is exposure, exposure, exposure.

For example this week I downloaded "Full Moon Fever" by Tom Petty (which I bought back in the nineties and it was stolen; incidentally) and even though this is "illegal" I have purchased about 6 or 7 other Petty albums from the store. As a side benefit I have been running my mouth to anyone who will listen about Full Moon Fever, Tom Petty and Jeff Lynne... So I think that makes my point. This goes for the smaller guys too...if their sh1t is good they won't be "the small guys" for long.

Finally on the issue of profit; a great musician will always find ways to turn some coin. I think the best and most rewarding method is through touring, but also through merchandising, special pressings and packages for hardcore fans, vinyl, and lastly by making their product cheap and available. I jumped on Radiohead's "In Rainbows" as soon as I heard about the online deal and paid $5, cause I am a for real "starving" artist.

Lastly I don't think music can really be "stolen" unless someone takes your song and sells it to advertise or distributes it themselves for profit. It's not the same medium as the Mona Lisa; where someone could snatch it and hide it away forever. Music is eternally reproducable and enjoyable in the same form as it was created in. Thats why I love music.
__________________________________________

"Freedom's just another word for nothing left to lose."
Old 1st March 2009 | Show parent
  #52
Gear Addict
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pryzefighter ➑️
I understand the argument but I think it falls short. Seems to me that there are plenty of opportunities for artists to make money besides letting the record industry be their pimp. The heart of the issue is the record industry, which as David Byrne said is thankfully in it's death throes now. People used to be able to buy records for five bucks, even in the eighties, then with CD's record companies thought they had a proprietary gold mine and began a gradual rate hike that has ended in some new albums costing more than $15. If CD's were more reasonably priced then more people would buy them. I download A LOT of music and still spend a lot on CDs and records. Like thousands of dollars in my life. My take on digital music is that people who listen to the top ten aren't really that into music and aren't going to have extensive libraries anyway. I think the highly positive side of music distributed online in any form is exposure, exposure, exposure.

For example this week I downloaded "Full Moon Fever" by Tom Petty (which I bought back in the nineties and it was stolen; incidentally) and even though this is "illegal" I have purchased about 6 or 7 other Petty albums from the store. As a side benefit I have been running my mouth to anyone who will listen about Full Moon Fever, Tom Petty and Jeff Lynne... So I think that makes my point. This goes for the smaller guys too...if their sh1t is good they won't be "the small guys" for long.

Finally on the issue of profit; a great musician will always find ways to turn some coin. I think the best and most rewarding method is through touring, but also through merchandising, special pressings and packages for hardcore fans, vinyl, and lastly by making their product cheap and available. I jumped on Radiohead's "In Rainbows" as soon as I heard about the online deal and paid $5, cause I am a for real "starving" artist.

Lastly I don't think music can really be "stolen" unless someone takes your song and sells it to advertise or distributes it themselves for profit. It's not the same medium as the Mona Lisa; where someone could snatch it and hide it away forever. Music is eternally reproducable and enjoyable in the same form as it was created in. Thats why I love music.
__________________________________________

"Freedom's just another word for nothing left to lose."
I think that there are lots of excuses out there to justify stealing music and your post there pretty much sums it up. I dont buy the "there's plenty of ways for musician to make money". Musicians want to make music/art, not figure out ways to make money because simply good ole fashion selling their art is now a "broken method"? To say its the itmes we live in is BS. Thats adding to the fire. WE are the times. WE make it what it is. I hate when people attribute "the times" to some elusive force creating xculture. People create culture. The aspect of the audio industry being pricks shouldnt even be used as an argument. People want to punish them but they end up [punishing the artist too. Plus I dont think anybody here would argue CD's couldve been cheaper. Sure they could have. But I'd still rather not punish the artist.
Old 1st March 2009 | Show parent
  #53
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Pryzefighter's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by somsto75 ➑️
I think that there are lots of excuses out there to justify stealing music and your post there pretty much sums it up. I dont buy the "there's plenty of ways for musician to make money". Musicians want to make music/art, not figure out ways to make money because simply good ole fashion selling their art is now a "broken method"? To say its the itmes we live in is BS. Thats adding to the fire. WE are the times. WE make it what it is. I hate when people attribute "the times" to some elusive force creating xculture. People create culture. The aspect of the audio industry being pricks shouldnt even be used as an argument. People want to punish them but they end up [punishing the artist too. Plus I dont think anybody here would argue CD's couldve been cheaper. Sure they could have. But I'd still rather not punish the artist.
Okay.... Where to begin. For starters it goes without saying that real musicians want to make art, but isn't everything up to and including selling albums "figuring out ways to make money?" Further isn't merchandising and playing live selling their art? I love the art involved in studio recording but live music is where it ends and begins, and there are many good acts left who still earn their bread playing music for their fans.

Secondly I agree that "we are the times" but I don't think I actually cited culture as the reason for the trend in the breakdown of the recording industry's monopoly on the manufacture and distribution of music. The real issue is they outstayed their welcome and abused their power.

Third.... The record industry sprang up around companies that had NOTHING to do with music for the most part. They were offshoots of existing corporations (or were quickly bought by them) who had the capital and distribution networks necessary to make artists their wh()re$. This led to a whole culture of a$$holes whose greatest attribute was being rich and having a monopoly on the means to make and distribute music; dfegadfat cats driving around in fancy cars and living in multi-million dollar homes when they didn't even have one artistic bone in their body. The revolution in digital music in the nineties was the wake up call to these pieces of ...... that, well; THE PARTY IS OVER.

Fourth.. Being a musician I hope and believe there is still a living to be made in making art; I just believe that we are still living in a revolutionary moment where the method is still being redefined. There are many alternatives out there, and still more everyday being discovered. Resourceful people are out on the edge of this revolution and making a whole new system in the process. Maybe everyone won't be able to make more money than god anymore. I don't know the answer, but I think that if someone is making art that is really that great there will be a market for it without RCA, Columbia, Clear Channel, Sony or whoever to take their cut out of it and control the product by making it "marketable" and screw up pure art in general. - but the state of "popular" music is a ten page essay in itself.
Old 1st March 2009 | Show parent
  #54
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Taurean's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pryzefighter ➑️
Okay.... Where to begin. For starters it goes without saying that real musicians want to make art, but isn't everything up to and including selling albums "figuring out ways to make money?" Further isn't merchandising and playing live selling their art? I love the art involved in studio recording but live music is where it ends and begins, and there are many good acts left who still earn their bread playing music for their fans.

Secondly I agree that "we are the times" but I don't think I actually cited culture as the reason for the trend in the breakdown of the recording industry's monopoly on the manufacture and distribution of music. The real issue is they outstayed their welcome and abused their power.

Third.... The record industry sprang up around companies that had NOTHING to do with music for the most part. They were offshoots of existing corporations (or were quickly bought by them) who had the capital and distribution networks necessary to make artists their wh()re$. This led to a whole culture of a$$holes whose greatest attribute was being rich and having a monopoly on the means to make and distribute music; dfegadfat cats driving around in fancy cars and living in multi-million dollar homes when they didn't even have one artistic bone in their body. The revolution in digital music in the nineties was the wake up call to these pieces of ...... that, well; THE PARTY IS OVER.

Fourth.. Being a musician I hope and believe there is still a living to be made in making art; I just believe that we are still living in a revolutionary moment where the method is still being redefined. There are many alternatives out there, and still more everyday being discovered. Resourceful people are out on the edge of this revolution and making a whole new system in the process. Maybe everyone won't be able to make more money than god anymore. I don't know the answer, but I think that if someone is making art that is really that great there will be a market for it without RCA, Columbia, Clear Channel, Sony or whoever to take their cut out of it and control the product by making it "marketable" and screw up pure art in general. - but the state of "popular" music is a ten page essay in itself.
There doesn't seem to be a big disagreement on record labels in general being blood suckers so to speak. I think there are certain trends good or bad that start, and it's usually not a majority who take part in the trend, but it falls to the wayside and when it's a bad trend such as file sharing and/or stealing music or even software maybe we should take responsibility of stopping it or at least doing something to not fuel it. This surely had an impact on the record industry. They admitted it themselves. So a bad trend was indeed detrimental and hurt the bad guy but it happened to hurt the good guy too. It is a vicious cycle, one feeds the other. If one says it's really because they outstayed their welcome and abused their power, one could say true and that's the reason people didn't hold the industry with high regard. But there's that cycle again. There should've been another way of fighting the avarice of the record companies, certainly not stealing music in which then stating comments such as "cd's are too pricey" or "record companies are evil empires" start to look like excuses.

Also having been a musician myself, I think the point there as far as "selling and finding ways to make money" is that a musician doesn't want to sit around to devise plans on making money; I know I don't. Yea it's exactly right that producing your music and selling it is a way of making money but it's also the most intuitive and natural way of doing so. It doesn't take much to realize that "ok, I made music, now I'd like to sell it in hopes to make some kind of living, support myself, and continue making the music people have come to love to begin with". I think that any simple and intuitive way for a legitimate and talented artist shouldn't be disregarded whether or not one may think music begins with live acts and ends with them. Do I dislike the record companies? Sure. They have definitely had a hand in antagonizing a collective consumer mentality that has ironically rebelled against itself but also hurting the musician. They started a **** that turned into another **** that smothered their initial **** creating one big **** in the end.
Old 1st March 2009 | Show parent
  #55
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Silver Sonya's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
To put this all in perspective.

These guys won.

Who takes the Grammys seriously? Come on now, people.

- c
Old 1st March 2009 | Show parent
  #56
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🎧 10 years
Pryzefighter,

I'm not sure if the artist wrote all the songs on that album you downloaded , and it seems a laudable arguement that you bought " all there other albums" .
But what If there was a song on that album written by a third party songwriter , why does'nt he deserve some royalty love ?

I don't want to get up in your grill at all , but I would like to encourage you to get past the record company bashing and start thinking beyond that ... If we continue to erode intellectual property rights it'll be like throwing the baby out with the bath water.

There are lots of corporations who have screwwd things up in the past . Did we strip them or all the inventors who worked for them of there patents??

The transgressions of the past will never again be as they were . There is so much information available to anyone who has the sense now to do some research instead of listening to " just leave the buisness stuff to me ".

I understand how you feel about the idiots who were at the helm in the '80 and '90s ,and ,god know that the RIAA has been a public relations nightmare in the recent past ; I agree they were idiots ( not unlike the fkers in the investment banking community we all are bailing out now ).

But ignoring the challenges we face now , whilst condoning that the creators of music be reduced to having no distribution earnings because of the free mentality , whilst all the while only focusing only on how much you hate the record co's is'nt going to solve any problems at all .
Old 1st March 2009 | Show parent
  #57
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Pryzefighter's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Ok- so what's next?

We can leave out everything about the record companies being a$$e$ and overcharging as a total aside.... I think that we are seeing things from a different viewpoint. The file sharing situation with Music and software or whatever is over and done with. If there was some kind of way to stop it; the hackers would just defeat it at the next turn. So because of that I am saying we are living in this moment in a period of redefining how you will sell your product. I think you can either be bitter about it and try to get people to feel bad that they are stealing from the artist, (even though the artist's cut on big label albums is $hit); or figure out a way to harness this movement. I am with the latter. I guess the next question is how to do this... As I already said I don't know the way out for sure but lots of people are experimenting. Pearl Jam, David Byrne, Radiohead, and NIN to name a few of the many. I have spent about $50 on Pearl Jam live downloads alone. There is a way to do this and I think the internet has the great promise of offering the artist true freedom over their music..... In the same way that home recording has opened doors to many starving artists.

Being an artist there is no doubt that I want the artist to succeed: maybe not so obscenely (think MTV cribs), but nonetheless I want the artist to get a cut.... But I don't want to shell out $15 everytime I want a CD when I am saving change in a jar for months at a time to buy the most rudimentary equipment to play myself. Like I said there are already many experimenting with alternatives. Maybe that should be a topic of discussion here.
--------------------
"talk amongst yourselves"
Old 1st March 2009 | Show parent
  #58
Gear Addict
 
Pryzefighter's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by Silver Sonya ➑️
To put this all in perspective.

These guys won.

Who takes the Grammys seriously? Come on now, people.

- c
No one that I know.... The grammys are like the oscars... Mastrubation for those already successful. And to boot they are more pointless than this next months issue of the TOP 100 "whatever"
Old 1st March 2009 | Show parent
  #59
Lives for gear
 
NetworkAudio's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
A few years ago I played on an album produced by someone who took home producer of the year that year.
It is by far the worst sounding hack job I have played on.
the first run of the disc had talking at the end of the last track which was removed after I pointed it out. the producer of the year did not even listen through the album for QC.
Old 1st March 2009 | Show parent
  #60
Gear Guru
 
lucey's Avatar
 
Verified Member
1 Review written
🎧 15 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pryzefighter ➑️
No one that I know.... The grammys are like the oscars... Mastrubation for those already successful. And to boot they are more pointless than this next months issue of the TOP 100 "whatever"
I have to disagree there ... although not perfect (whatever that is) the Oscars have found their integrity to a large extent. This began when higher quality films made their way into popularity, and now the mainstream studios are often more interested in the Sundance crowd than they are the predictable big budget/big expectations blockbusters. The joke made this year by Will Smith pretty well proves this out.
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