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How Did This Win a Grammy?
Old 15th March 2021 | Show parent
  #91
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engmix's Avatar
When one can Lobby to win an award, there is something inherently wrong. On the upside, anything that is promoting music is a good thing. You take the good with the bad.
Old 15th March 2021 | Show parent
  #92
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🎧 15 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by engmix ➡️
When one can Lobby to win an award, there is something inherently wrong. On the upside, anything that is promoting music is a good thing. You take the good with the bad.
Agreed. I wish is wasn't so political. And I say that having won yesterday.
Old 15th March 2021 | Show parent
  #93
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Riccardo's Avatar
 
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🎧 15 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by charlienyc ➡️
Agreed. I wish is wasn't so political. And I say that having won yesterday.
Congratulations!
Old 15th March 2021 | Show parent
  #94
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engmix's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by charlienyc ➡️
Agreed. I wish is wasn't so political. And I say that having won yesterday.
Either way, congrats. A colleague of mine won an Emmy, I think it's that? It's crazy how political being elected and actually winning is.
Old 16th March 2021 | Show parent
  #95
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🎧 15 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by engmix ➡️
It's crazy how political being elected and actually winning is.
Thanks! Yes, fwiw for various political reasons (even outside the Academy), I missed out on at least three nominations. Bad timing cost me another two. Ah well I can't complain now with a nom. & win. cheers.
Old 16th March 2021 | Show parent
  #96
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🎧 15 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by charlienyc ➡️
Thanks! Yes, fwiw for various political reasons (even outside the Academy), I missed out on at least three nominations. Bad timing cost me another two. Ah well I can't complain now with a nom. & win. cheers.
Well done Charlie, may there be many more in your future.
Old 16th March 2021 | Show parent
  #97
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lowland ➡️
Well done Charlie, may there be many more in your future.
Thanks!
Old 16th March 2021 | Show parent
  #98
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telecode's Avatar
 
🎧 5 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by charlienyc ➡️
Thanks!
yeah. congrats!!
Old 16th March 2021 | Show parent
  #99
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telecode's Avatar
 
🎧 5 years
On another note, so i spent the last two days listening to the Fiona Apple record that won for best alternative release as well as best alternative vocal. I sort of missed it when it was released as I am not the biggest fan.

I completely fail to understand how this is alternative music. I liked the record and it's a great release and great to see people like her making music. But since when and how can this be alternative? It's avant garde folk or avant garde pop at best. a continuation of what people like Laurie Anderson, Kate Bush and Tori Amos were/are doing. I don't get how that can redefine criteria in genres so much. Next Nu Metal will be called "hard rock"?
Old 17th March 2021
  #100
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🎧 15 years
There were many excellent records, nominees and winners this year.

Look for the good ones, not the “bad” ones!

https://www.cbsnews.com/news/grammy-...nominees-2021/

jt
Old 17th March 2021 | Show parent
  #101
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Slug1's Avatar
 
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🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by charlienyc ➡️
Thanks!
Wow!! Awesome!! Also saw Daniel Weiss received the Technical GRAMMY!! Outstanding!! We salute you!!
Old 17th March 2021 | Show parent
  #102
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🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by scraggs ➡️
And regarding the Grammies....all I have to say is: Jethro Tull.
That happened in the 1980s and we still haven't forgiven them
Old 3 weeks ago | Show parent
  #103
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IM WHO YOU THINK's Avatar
 
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🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hippocratic Mastering ➡️
What does this even mean?
It means the people he thought should win didn't and he has a problem with the world changing from his "good old days" when the winners were those he thought should win.
Old 2 weeks ago
  #104
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🎧 5 years
I'm interested in the technical side of getting things to around -4.5 LUFS in busy tracks (like a full rock band, for instance). Not that I want to do it, but I'm interested to know how it's even done and the steps taken to get there.

I threw on The Strokes album The New Abnormal, which won best rock album this year. I quickly realized that it's loud, and I looked at the second track where it's around -4.7 LUFS when the whole band is playing (which is most of the song). There are basically no troughs in the waveform.

No doubt these Strokes songs were made loud during tracking and mixing. In my own work, I use what I'd consider generous amounts of compression during tracking and mixing in pretty busy/dense mixes (more these days than I used to even), and I mix to get the sweet spot of my masters to be around -10 or -9 LUFS. If they're pushed really loud (say -7 or -6), they become mangled, sloppy, distorted messes. So it's not even possible to get them to -5 or -4.5 LUFS during mastering. I would have to mix it louder to get it to the final louder ballpark.

I guess the simple answer that I suspect is that copious amounts of compression and possibly limiting is used on tracks in these mixes. Is that how many professionals are working these days, squashing down every track in a mix? What goes into that decision process ("We need to get the song extremely, extremely loud, so I'll compress everything a lot")? Or is it just that they think it sounds good? I'm not being negative here, although it may sound like it. I'm just trying to understand the thought process and the actual technical process.

One other question: How much does limiting on individual tracks play a role to get rid of expansive peaks? I almost never do this. Maybe mixers who get songs to -4.5 LUFS are doing it, but I've never worked with one of these people. I really don't know.
Old 2 weeks ago
  #105
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SmoothTone's Avatar
 
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🎧 5 years
Some mixes just lend themselves to being loud and are easy to get there gracefully while others you have to battle for every half dB once they reach a certain point.

I think it starts with arrangement. Some bands intuitively know how to work together to create that wall of sound. They stay out of each other's way and the whole becomes more than the sum of its parts.

Then they play with energy. If it sounds loud in the room it can more easily sound loud on a record. (Also, having a room that's nice enough to be loud in is massively helpful!)

If the engineer knows how to use the gear at his or her disposal to capture that energy, or even enhance it, then you're well on the way to a mix that can be cut loud. Sometimes that means pushing gear a bit harder; sometimes not. Every piece has its sweet spot and can contribute to the desired effect or detract from it. Plugins too. But ya gotta listen and know your tools.

If the mix is well balanced musically and spectrally, with good harmonic detail and with the energy carrying through from the performance, then final loudness should be less of a struggle.

Sometimes too much compression can take you in the opposite direction. The key is compressing the parts that need to be controlled while keeping the energy, movement and space in the performance.

This is why tasteful amounts of saturation and clipping are sometimes preferable to compression and limiting because they can maintain and even enhance the energy while increasing RMS. But you have to listen carefully, level-matched, to be really sure you're actually getting what you wanted. The threshold at which the saturation occurs is just as important as in compression.

If you are are doing you're own mastering, then maybe there's a good argument for using a bit of limiting or clipping on individual busses, especially drums. If you can avoid having a limiter modulate the whole mix then why not? I don't mind people sending me mixes for mastering like this when it's done tastefully. But, as always, experiment and listen.
Old 2 weeks ago | Show parent
  #106
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Zed999's Avatar
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SmoothTone ➡️
Some mixes just lend themselves to being loud and are easy to get there gracefully while others you have to battle for every half dB once they reach a certain point.

I think it starts with arrangement. Some bands intuitively know how to work together to create that wall of sound. They stay out of each other's way and the whole becomes more than the sum of its parts.

Then they play with energy. If it sounds loud in the room it can more easily sound loud on a record. (Also, having a room that's nice enough to be loud in is massively helpful!)

If the engineer knows how to use the gear at his or her disposal to capture that energy, or even enhance it, then you're well on the way to a mix that can be cut loud. Sometimes that means pushing gear a bit harder; sometimes not. Every piece has its sweet spot and can contribute to the desired effect or detract from it. Plugins too. But ya gotta listen and know your tools.

If the mix is well balanced musically and spectrally, with good harmonic detail and with the energy carrying through from the performance, then final loudness should be less of a struggle.

Sometimes too much compression can take you in the opposite direction. The key is compressing the parts that need to be controlled while keeping the energy, movement and space in the performance.

This is why tasteful amounts of saturation and clipping are sometimes preferable to compression and limiting because they can maintain and even enhance the energy while increasing RMS. But you have to listen carefully, level-matched, to be really sure you're actually getting what you wanted. The threshold at which the saturation occurs is just as important as in compression.

If you are are doing you're own mastering, then maybe there's a good argument for using a bit of limiting or clipping on individual busses, especially drums. If you can avoid having a limiter modulate the whole mix then why not? I don't mind people sending me mixes for mastering like this when it's done tastefully. But, as always, experiment and listen.
Search for "clip to zero" and/or read this. It works.
https://docs.google.com/document/d/1...ps3rXewPM/edit
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