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Roof types and ceiling heights
Old 27th January 2019
  #1
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Roof types and ceiling heights

Hello,

I am going to go ahead and post this question in the Mastering Forum because the response in the acoustics forum is pretty much non-existent.

This is a question for Professional folks who have some experience with this type of thing, and I think there are probably plenty in this forum who will understand the question.

I am having a shed built on my property, for my studio / Tiki bar / musical adventureland / whatever. : )

I am probably going to use Tuffshed to build the thing, because they will actually assemble it all on site and handle the subcontracting and so forth.

The standard sidewall heights for the type of building I am contemplating is 8'1". You can add up to 5' of additional height, in 1' increments, but its expensive.

The two roof styles they offer are Gambel and Gable.

I asked them about a structure 24' wide and they say they can do it with scissor trusses and no "bottom chord". I'm attaching a drawing they provided which illustrates the two different roof styles with the scissor trusses and some area calculations.

Now I want really high ceilings, and I'm trying to decide which way to get them with the least problem / expense.

The Gambrel roof scenario is quite a bit more expensive than the Gable roof, but it provides quite a bit more clear height, although the width of the room would diminish as it goes higher. Using the Gambrel roof may be cheaper and even better than adding 5' to the sidewalls on a Gable roof building.

The scissor trusses don't really bother me in this scenario. I don't really think they are going to be much in the way of anything. So, I'm thinking of just leaving the whole thing open and then treating the space it as it needs it once its built and measurements can be taken.

I'm looking for opinions on whether or not the "extra height" provided by the Gambrel roof style is just about as good as actually having taller sidewalls. It would be even higher [but narrower at the top] than adding 5' to the sidewalls and using a Gable roof. But the vault under the Gambrel roof does narrow as it goes up [because it tracks the roof], whereas actual extended sidewalls would go straight up [but not as high].

Either way, its not going to be a flat ceiling.

Hopefully this makes sense.

Thanks in advance for any expert responses.


Best,

audioforce
Attached Files
File Type: pdf 24X TRUSSES.pdf (11.6 KB, 64 views)
Old 27th January 2019
  #2
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The ancient greeks in their theater had not celling.
Old 27th January 2019
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Deleted 230b1c7
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But they did not have to worry about their electrical components getting doused with rain.
Old 27th January 2019
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Quote:
Originally Posted by audioforce ➡️
I'm looking for opinions on whether or not the "extra height" provided by the Gambrel roof style is just about as good as actually having taller sidewalls.
It is.

So long as you have a decent amount of height, either way will work great.
Old 27th January 2019 | Show parent
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Deleted 230b1c7 ➡️
But they did not have to worry about their electrical components getting doused with rain.
They use the thunder lights for the light and amphora for the amp.
At this time, no need mic, speakers, dsp, no need cable. They were strong.
Old 28th January 2019 | Show parent
  #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by scraggs ➡️
It is.

So long as you have a decent amount of height, either way will work great.
Thanks, man. I appreciate it. You don't think the way the "roof walls" start to angle in will be problematic, then?

I thought it might actually be helpful in some way, as any reflections would be more diffuse.

Like I said, either way its not going to be a flat ceiling, unless I put a cloud there or something.

Do you [or anybody else who wants to comment] feel like the Gambrel ceiling is better than the Gable ceiling acoustically?


Thanks again,


audioforce
Old 28th January 2019 | Show parent
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Quote:
Originally Posted by audioforce ➡️
You don't think the way the "roof walls" start to angle in will be problematic, then?
Naw.

If you're doing it right you're going to have treatment up there regardless of ceiling type.

If the Gambrel style gets you a higher ceiling I'd go with that if you can swing the dough.

What length are you planning?
Old 28th January 2019 | Show parent
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Quote:
Originally Posted by scraggs ➡️
Naw.

If you're doing it right you're going to have treatment up there regardless of ceiling type.

If the Gambrel style gets you a higher ceiling I'd go with that if you can swing the dough.

What length are you planning?
Thinking of 34-footish or so for the length. I'll try to get close to some "advantageous ratio".

But I need some space for the bathroom, maybe a little kitchenette, and I'm actually thinking of plumbing it for a Jacuzzi tub. Even if I can't install it right away, at least it would be plumbed for it. My inclination is to put all that stuff right at the entrance to the building, and maybe wall it off. That way the rest of the building is an open symmetrical space to work with. Does that sound reasonable to you? Any other / better ideas?

I was thinking about some sort of removable cloud for the ceiling area. I could Keep it open for tracking and maybe tighten it up for mixing and mastering. I'm actually just tossing around a bunch of ideas still.

I do think I'm well served to get it as big as I can, within reason.

Thanks for responding to this, man.


cheers,


audioforce
Old 28th January 2019
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For a 30Hz wave to open up fully I believe you need a minimum of 16’ in ceiling height if I remember correctly. Mine are 18’ at peak.

I’d do scissor trusses or a conventional stack myself ( this is what I did for Silvertone), why go through the extra added expense of a gambrel roof. Note that if you do conventional rafters when it rains you will hear it hitting the roof a little. Scissor trusses are really the way to go.
Old 28th January 2019
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In your situation, for the sake of a few percent of the build cost I would run this past an acoustic consultant. Otherwise if you don't have at least some of that skillset, it's just guesswork and you could end up with a space that needs problems solving from the start.

Here I had Nick Whitaker specify the initial parameters of the building using among other things a suitable 'golden rectangle' to fit the available plot; then the guys who did the eventual build, who have a long history of studio work, added the finishing touches to the design including things I wouldn't have thought of such as roof snow load.
Old 28th January 2019
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Good advise... alway best to consult with professionals ahead of time.

Steven Durr did my plans but I built it myself since I’ve always been a contractor as well. Well, out of that game for the last 25 years but I’ve built 6 Studios and over 300 homes in my time. Went back into last year and built two garages and a screened porch addition last year. About to do a kitchen remodel.

As for building... Snow loads are calculated by the architectural engineer here. You won’t get a building permit without those. Truss Company also has to provide stamped plans which stay on file at the building department permanently.

Always fun to build. I’m shooting for building another house on some land I own next to mine within the next year or so. It’d take me 10 years in this industry to make what I can make in six months to one year of building.
Old 28th January 2019 | Show parent
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Quote:
Originally Posted by audioforce ➡️
My inclination is to put all that stuff right at the entrance to the building, and maybe wall it off. That way the rest of the building is an open symmetrical space to work with. Does that sound reasonable to you?
Yeah that's a good idea. Make the wall between that stuff and the studio proper fairly thin and that space will help do some bass trapping.

Actually if you're out in the country and noise/neighbors aren't too much of a concern, make ALL the walls on the thin side and let a lot of the bass escape.
Old 29th January 2019 | Show parent
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Quote:
Originally Posted by scraggs ➡️
Yeah that's a good idea. Make the wall between that stuff and the studio proper fairly thin and that space will help do some bass trapping.

Actually if you're out in the country and noise/neighbors aren't too much of a concern, make ALL the walls on the thin side and let a lot of the bass escape.

Right, the building is just going up as a shell, no drywalll or anything. They use something called “Smartside” ( kind of like Hardyboard). But there’s a Housesrap and radiant barrier, too. I figure I’ll get someone over to measure and do whatever treatment / insulation? to the inside after I get it built.

cheers,

audioforce
Old 29th January 2019 | Show parent
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Silvertone ➡️
For a 30Hz wave to open up fully I believe you need a minimum of 16’ in ceiling height if I remember correctly. Mine are 18’ at peak.
Hi Larry,

I checked and, actually it look like a 30ZHz wave is 37.6666..... feet. Hmmm.

Wavelength

Can someone verify?

I'm not so sure its necessary to have room for the waves to fully propagate, but maybe its helpful in some way. The "recommendation" being floated around lately is for a 13' ceiling for a control room. Not sure that's Gospel, but that figure gets batted around.

Are your ceilings peaked in the middle, like a Gable roof? If so, what is the sidewall height, if you don't mind my asking? Did you treat the ceiling?


Quote:
I’d do scissor trusses or a conventional stack myself ( this is what I did for Silvertone), why go through the extra added expense of a gambrel roof. Note that if you do conventional rafters when it rains you will hear it hitting the roof a little. Scissor trusses are really the way to go.
What do you mean exactly by "conventional stack" or "conventional rafters"?

I can do scissor trusses with either the Gambrel or Gable roof, btw. The Gambrel roof just goes a lot higher. Otherwise I think I'm going to have to actually extend the sidewalls and get the height that way. Standard sidewalls are 8'1", but they can be extended up to an additional 5 feet. Its expensive to extend them. Maybe more expensive than the Gambrel roof.

Yeah, I think there may be a little noise if it rains hard, but I'll have to see what can be done about it. There's a guy around here who does acoustical insulation that's supposed to be real good. Maybe, we'll see.




cheers,

audioforce
Old 29th January 2019 | Show parent
  #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lowland ➡️
In your situation, for the sake of a few percent of the build cost I would run this past an acoustic consultant. Otherwise if you don't have at least some of that skillset, it's just guesswork and you could end up with a space that needs problems solving from the start.

Here I had Nick Whitaker specify the initial parameters of the building using among other things a suitable 'golden rectangle' to fit the available plot; then the guys who did the eventual build, who have a long history of studio work, added the finishing touches to the design including things I wouldn't have thought of such as roof snow load.
Hi Nigel,

I've spoken with a couple acousticians / studio designers.

Tuffshed's Engineering Dept takes care of all the permitting and all that. Although I may get someone else to draw up the plans. Snow load probably not an issue in Florida. : )

You know those "Golden Ratios" and all the other published ratios people have been using seem to have fallen out of favor. I think they were devised assuming perfectly reflective surfaces, and using a single speaker source for the audio. Then there's the fact that studios are not empty rooms. There are humans, racks of gear, consoles..............

But I think it makes sense to avoid a room that's a cube, or that has walls that are multiples, and so forth

My thinking is just to spend the money on making it big, and thereby circumvent small room acoustics problems. But no so big that long reverberation times are out of control.

I don't have a ton of money, so I'm doing my best to get something built that can be useful and will be amenable to upgrading and changing as I go. I am trying to go with the "go big or go home" theory, because, in my experience, sheer volume overcomes a lot of issues and I need room for a lot of gear [and the Jacuzzi, ...........]. : )


What do you think with regard to the ceiling type? What are you using at your place?

I also thought I might be able to get some sort of removable cloud for the ceiling, so I could take it off and leave the ceiling open and tall for tracking, and then tighten it down a little for mixing or mastering. What do you think of that?


cheers,

audioforce
Old 29th January 2019 | Show parent
  #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by audioforce ➡️
Hi Nigel,

I've spoken with a couple acousticians / studio designers.

Tuffshed's Engineering Dept takes care of all the permitting and all that. Although I may get someone else to draw up the plans. Snow load probably not an issue in Florida. : )

You know those "Golden Ratios" and all the other published ratios people have been using seem to have fallen out of favor. I think they were devised assuming perfectly reflective surfaces, and using a single speaker source for the audio. Then there's the fact that studios are not empty rooms. There are humans, racks of gear, consoles..............

But I think it makes sense to avoid a room that's a cube, or that has walls that are multiples, and so forth

My thinking is just to spend the money of making it big, and thereby circumvent small room acoustics problems. But no so big that long reverberation times are out of control.


What do you think with regard to the ceiling type? What are you using at your place?

I also thought I might be able to get some sort of removable cloud for the ceiling, so I could take it off and leave the ceiling open and tall for tracking, and then tighten it down a little for mixing or mastering. What do you think of that?


cheers,

audioforce
Thanks audioforce: my room has been up for a few years, and you've got me thinking about acoustics again, never a bad thing!

The ceiling here is pitched, 4m (no cross-struts) with 2.4m side walls. Behind the acoustic ceiling tiles are three tuned - with bungs - plastic drain pipes as Helmholtz resonators running inside the full length of the roof to help control the central resonance - works well.

FWIW, for mastering I've not felt the need for a cloud; that said, as Scraggs indicated, this is a wood framed building with wood, insulation and plasterboard walls in the countryside: thanks to the initial calculations there are no bass traps as a controlled amount of low end goes out through the walls.

The inside plasterboard sheets are mounted on rubber and covered in cloth. Although the sides look parallel, the suspensions have been adjusted to angle the sheets so that there's no noticeable side to side echo.

Last edited by lowland; 29th January 2019 at 05:26 PM..
Old 29th January 2019 | Show parent
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Your right, that sounds correct, more a 60 Hz wave. No you don’t need it so the wave opens up completely obviously, it just cuts down on reflection and ceiling compression.

I have two floating 4 x 12 ceiling clouds that sit over the mix position. Bear in mind I face along the long wall. So the sound goes up and over. Less reflections from the side walls that way as well.

My rooms fall into Loudens ratios which are tried and true. In fact I copied Bob Ludwigs Gateway Mastering room when I did mine.

Get The Master Handbook of Acoustics, it will answer every question you have about building a studio and acoustics in general.

Best of luck.


Quote:
Originally Posted by audioforce ➡️
Hi Larry,

I checked and, actually it look like a 30ZHz wave is 37.6666..... feet. Hmmm.

Wavelength

Can someone verify?

I'm not so sure its necessary to have room for the waves to fully propagate, but maybe its helpful in some way. The "recommendation" being floated around lately is for a 13' ceiling for a control room. Not sure that's Gospel, but that figure gets batted around.

Are your ceilings peaked in the middle, like a Gable roof? If so, what is the sidewall height, if you don't mind my asking? Did you treat the ceiling?




What do you mean exactly by "conventional stack" or "conventional rafters"?

I can do scissor trusses with either the Gambrel or Gable roof, btw. The Gambrel roof just goes a lot higher. Otherwise I think I'm going to have to actually extend the sidewalls and get the height that way. Standard sidewalls are 8'1", but they can be extended up to an additional 5 feet. Its expensive to extend them. Maybe more expensive than the Gambrel roof.

Yeah, I think there may be a little noise if it rains hard, but I'll have to see what can be done about it. There's a guy around here who does acoustical insulation that's supposed to be real good. Maybe, we'll see.




cheers,

audioforce
Old 29th January 2019 | Show parent
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Silvertone ➡️
For a 30Hz wave to open up fully I believe you need a minimum of 16’ in ceiling height if I remember correctly. Mine are 18’ at peak.

I’d do scissor trusses or a conventional stack myself ( this is what I did for Silvertone), why go through the extra added expense of a gambrel roof. Note that if you do conventional rafters when it rains you will hear it hitting the roof a little. Scissor trusses are really the way to go.
you got me beat there LarrY!

mine are a mere 12’ high :-o}>

the shame....

best, jt
Old 29th January 2019 | Show parent
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jerry Tubb ➡️
you got me beat there LarrY!

mine are a mere 12’ high :-o}>

the shame....

best, jt
lol Jerry. Ha, this is one place where size does matter. Yuk yuk.

As you know there are many ways to alter or remove ceiling, wall and floor reflections.

I’ve worked in rooms with 8 foot high ceilings that when treated with proper acoustic treatments have been a pleasure to work in.

Steven Durr told me a long time ago that if you can build a room, treat it properly (even with conventional furnishings like a living room) and conversation sounds good in that room you’re 80% of the way there. I would agree.

I’ve had 12 rooms in my lifetime... my 1964 Gretsch drums have never sounded or recorded better than the room I am in now. All my friends who have studios themselves that I jam with always want to do it here because they all love how the room sounds. As they say, I can hear everyone so easily. Makes for a better experience and end product.

I’m a big proponent for working within Loudens ratios when it comes to acoustic spaced. Tried and true throughout the decades. YMWV
Old 29th January 2019
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Oh my walls go up 12 feet high and then the conventional stack (2x12’s)... my roof pitch is 7/12. If I used scissor trusses my final ceiling height would’ve been around 14to 16 feet depending on the design of the trusses.

If you went 10’ high walls with scissor trusses you’d be around 12 to 14’ high ceiling height (again depending on truss design). That’s with a 6/12 pitch... anything greater gets you more ceiling height... 12/12 and you can build it to look like a church. lol

I would say to go with scissor trusses otherwise every rain drop, plane and helicopter will be heard. I hear them all the time. I’m on bedrock as well, so in headphones you can hear the trucks coming down the hill from a mile away... and my floors are floated. Bedrock is a bitch, luckily it’s so low in the noise floor it’s easy to roll out... not so much with those planes. lol
Old 29th January 2019 | Show parent
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Silvertone ➡️
Steven Durr told me a long time ago that if you can build a room, treat it properly (even with conventional furnishings like a living room) and conversation sounds good in that room you’re 80% of the way there. I would agree.
I've long felt that to be true, didn't know it was a 'thing' :-) It's the case here, one of the characteristics I noticed from day one that reassured me this was going to be a good space.

The PMC install guys use a good (BBC I think) male speech recording to start their setup, and can tell much about a room from it before playing other music, tones etc.
Old 29th January 2019
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When we had the studio opening party here back in October it was the first time I'd really heard real conversations in there. Previous to that all the talking had been me swearing at stuff. Listening to people talk in there sounded just great and I was delighted.

Anyway, audioforce you are on the right track making your space big, you'll avoid a ton of small room problems and have more room for the treatment you need. You don't have to worry about too much reverb, with treatment you can get it just how you want it.
Old 30th January 2019 | Show parent
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Silvertone ➡️
Oh my walls go up 12 feet high and then the conventional stack (2x12’s)... my roof pitch is 7/12. If I used scissor trusses my final ceiling height would’ve been around 14to 16 feet depending on the design of the trusses.

If you went 10’ high walls with scissor trusses you’d be around 12 to 14’ high ceiling height (again depending on truss design). That’s with a 6/12 pitch... anything greater gets you more ceiling height... 12/12 and you can build it to look like a church. lol

I would say to go with scissor trusses otherwise every rain drop, plane and helicopter will be heard. I hear them all the time. I’m on bedrock as well, so in headphones you can hear the trucks coming down the hill from a mile away... and my floors are floated. Bedrock is a bitch, luckily it’s so low in the noise floor it’s easy to roll out... not so much with those planes. lol
Hi Larry,

Thanks for your responses in this. I appreciate the info and help.

I'm a little confused about a couple of things in your post.
What exactly do you mean by "conventional stack"?
Also, why will the scissor trusses help reduce raindrop noise? Is there anything else along those lines?


Thanks,


audioforce
Old 30th January 2019 | Show parent
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Quote:
Originally Posted by scraggs ➡️
When we had the studio opening party here back in October it was the first time I'd really heard real conversations in there. Previous to that all the talking had been me swearing at stuff. Listening to people talk in there sounded just great and I was delighted.

Anyway, audioforce you are on the right track making your space big, you'll avoid a ton of small room problems and have more room for the treatment you need. You don't have to worry about too much reverb, with treatment you can get it just how you want it.
Thanks, man. I sure hope so. Pretty nerve-wracking for me trying to deal with all the different issues of getting it started.



Thanks,

audioforce
Old 30th January 2019 | Show parent
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No problem.

A conventional stack is when you take 2x12’s and a center ridge beam at the top and that forms your roof framing. No trusses. You cut a birds mouth in the 2x12 and that sits on you wall, you cut the top angle of the 2x12 to lay into the beam. There is no air gap between the roof top and the ceiling of your studio. Well there’s a small one cause you use vent a ridge all the way up under your insulation so you roof can breath. The insulation is then stuffed between the 2x12’s.

With a scissor truss. There a gap of 3 to 4 feet (near the ridge, less at the walls of course) from the roof top to your ceiling inside. Here your insulation is at the bottom of the scissor truss, your studios ceiling. It’s the space between the insulation and roof that helps to isolate the sound.

I hope that makes sense.



Quote:
Originally Posted by audioforce ➡️
Hi Larry,

Thanks for your responses in this. I appreciate the info and help.

I'm a little confused about a couple of things in your post.
What exactly do you mean by "conventional stack"?
Also, why will the scissor trusses help reduce raindrop noise? Is there anything else along those lines?


Thanks,


audioforce

Last edited by Silvertone; 30th January 2019 at 01:48 PM..
Old 30th January 2019
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Scissor truss... only I wouldn’t use blown in insulation...
Attached Thumbnails
Roof types and ceiling heights-38a19ad3-01bc-464e-b05c-e9368423406b.jpeg  
Old 31st January 2019 | Show parent
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Silvertone ➡️
No problem.

A conventional stack is when you take 2x12’s and a center ridge beam at the top and that forms your roof framing. No trusses. You cut a birds mouth in the 2x12 and that sits on you wall, you cut the top angle of the 2x12 to lay into the beam. There is no air gap between the roof top and the ceiling of your studio. Well there’s a small one cause you use vent a ridge all the way up under your insulation so you roof can breath. The insulation is then stuffed between the 2x12’s.

With a scissor truss. There a gap of 3 to 4 feet (near the ridge, less at the walls of course) from the roof top to your ceiling inside. Here your insulation is at the bottom of the scissor truss, your studios ceiling. It’s the space between the insulation and roof that helps to isolate the sound.

I hope that makes sense.
O.K., I kind of understand this, I think. My family had a construction company back in the day, building homes and condos mostly. I did a little work with that, but not much. Mostly just hauling stuff, and trying not to get in the way. : ). Most of the time I was in Miami, NYC, and LA doing my music thing.

Not sure I follow what you mean by "The insulation is then stuffed between the 2x12s". ???? Don't the 2x12s butt up against each other and form the roof? Or am I completely confused?

Anyhow, I may need to reevaluate this, but I was actually thinking of not finishing the inside with drywall or anything, just going with the shell, and then trying to put up treatment on the inside of the shell. What do you think? Is it possible? I heard Neil Young made records in a barn!

I understand the noise issue, but I am pretty much out in the middle of nowhere on about 10 acres. It does rain, though, and if I understand you correctly, you are talking about having an actual ceiling built right under the scissor trusses in order to minimize rain noise.

Actually, I have been thinking of leaving the rafters wide open, with just treatment on the inside [all or part] instead of a hard ceiling, and, if needed, maybe using some sort of ceiling cloud[s] that I could take down [for tracking] or put up as needed [mixing, mastering]. I'm just trying to think different scenarios through, and the main thing is probably that I use dimensions for the shell that will not create problems for me later and that will give enough room for options.

I do need to settle on a length, width, and height, and the layout so I can order the thing. I'm thinking of using a mini-split for HVAC, so I guess I'll need at least one window. Wondering what wall would be best for that?

I was thinking of the speakers firing down the length of the building, but it looks like you're doing it the other way [which I understand]. How long and wide is the room you're in? I guess either way will work as long as there is enough distance between the sidewalls, right? With a Gambrel roof, or even a Gable roof, it seems to me that having the peak run front to back is easier to treat, no? I also have to put the bathroom and kitchenette along one wall, and I thought it would go at the entrance [shorter wall], maybe walled off, so everything beyond it would be symmetrical.

Your comments on this are certainly appreciated.

Any other folks who have up and running pro rooms feel free to jump in, too, if you want and clue me in on what’s working for you. Pleeeaaase, no doomsday scenarios. I can't build a hermetically sealed room-in-a-room-in-a-room-in-a-faraday-cage type spaceship. Its a shed / barn, and I'm not working with unlimited funds or anything. I'm just trying to make it big as possible, and workable.

cheers,

audoforce
Old 31st January 2019
  #28
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I'm going to attach some .pdf files of drawings of the building that the Tuffshed people sent me. These are not the exact building size but it shows kind of what the options and general style of the buildings are. Most of these show the Gambrel roof, but there is a Gable roof available too.

I'm interested in comments about this. Other than a small buildout I did in a loft in NYC in the ‘80’s, I've always put my gear in an existing space. This is rather new to me.


cheers,

audioforce
Attached Files
File Type: pdf 24X TRUSSES.pdf (11.6 KB, 20 views) File Type: pdf BG 20X30-.pdf (68.2 KB, 18 views) File Type: pdf BG 20X30-ELEV.pdf (684.7 KB, 24 views) File Type: pdf FL-PTB-TB600-TB700-01-12x24-145C-2017 FBC-SIGNED.pdf (2.12 MB, 21 views)
Old 31st January 2019
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http://lipinskisound.com/download/Li...round_room.pdf

All is in the link above.
Old 31st January 2019 | Show parent
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4 Reviews written
🎧 15 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by audioforce ➡️

I was thinking of the speakers firing down the length of the building, but it looks like you're doing it the other way [which I understand]. How long and wide is the room you're in? I guess either way will work as long as there is enough distance between the sidewalls, right? With a Gambrel roof, or even a Gable roof, it seems to me that having the peak run front to back is easier to treat, no? I also have to put the bathroom and kitchenette along one wall, and I thought it would go at the entrance [shorter wall], maybe walled off, so everything beyond it would be symmetrical.
You weren't asking me this but....I would put your speakers on the short wall and the bath/kitchenette as well, this just seems way more logical than the other way.

My room is 20x30, it's a nice size.

What Larry was talking about before with the 2x12s...those are the rafters.

As far as not drywalling it...you're in Florida? How cold does it get?
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