Quantcast
drum recording - 2 mics - Gearspace.com
The No.1 Website for Pro Audio
drum recording - 2 mics
Old 17th May 2006
  #1
Gear Nut
 
🎧 15 years
drum recording - 2 mics

just for demos and such, I record drums into my Lexicon Omega with an Equitek E-100 as an overhead and an SM57 on the bass drum (which I just started doing). I place the Equitek right in front of my kit, a little above the rack tom and ride cymbal, but below the crash cymbal.

Is there a better spot I can put the overhead to get the best sound possible? And for the SM57 in the bass drum, should i stick it right in there, or try from a few feet away? Any ideas on the best possible placements and such would be appreciated. Keep in mind I'm just doing some demos in my basement (which I have no idea if it's a good spot to record drums in).
Old 17th May 2006
  #2
Lives for gear
 
Jim vanBergen's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
Yes. Two suggestions:
1) directly overhead the edge of the snare closest to the tom, go about 12" above the cymbals. Mute the kick, PFL OH, Listen to the drummer & raise & lower to taste.

2) Steve Remote's famous "over the shoulder" position, directly over the drummer's right shoulder facing the inside of the kit- this gets what the drummer hears quite nicely. Make sure the drummer's head does not obscure the HF content of the snare, hat, crash or splash on his left side, I made this mistake on a killer take and regretted it for a LONG time.

Personally I do more with three mics- Kick, snare, OH because you can use the snare mic to go over snare or undersnare if you have brushwork, or if you want more or less hat you can maneuver it to capture the drummer's right side- but as always, be very wary of phase.

Hope this helps!

Jim
Old 17th May 2006 | Show parent
  #3
Gear Maniac
 
tgrokz's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
i herd you can get some good results if you throw up 2 57s about 3-5 feet from the kit, about 3 feet away parallel from eachother, and about 4 feet off the ground. never tried it though.
Old 17th May 2006 | Show parent
  #4
Gear Nut
 
🎧 15 years
thanks a bunch for both of those replies! I'll write those suggestions down and use them next time I'm working....if anyone else has sugestions please let me know.
Old 17th May 2006 | Show parent
  #5
Lives for gear
 
🎧 15 years
I accidentally got a great 1 mic drum track once with a MXL V69. I tried to duplicate it but could not. Mic in the same position. Same kit.

It finally occured to me what I missed... during the track I was trying to duplicate there was a vocalist singing into the same mic. It was a quick notation of a vocal while the drummer played behind him just for reference. It wasn't supposed to be usable.

On the parts when he wasn't singing the drums sounded absolutely great. Punchy and balanced.

With the same setup and nobody standing there it all goes away.

Sound is a freaky thing sometimes.

Lawrence
Old 18th May 2006 | Show parent
  #6
Lives for gear
 
kingneeraj's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by tgrokz
i herd you can get some good results if you throw up 2 57s about 3-5 feet from the kit, about 3 feet away parallel from eachother, and about 4 feet off the ground. never tried it though.
I don't know about just 2 57's... but could be possible i guess...

I have seen an engineer record some drums with just 2 Earworks TC30's and they sounded great!
Old 18th May 2006 | Show parent
  #7
Here for the gear
 
🎧 15 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by tgrokz
i herd you can get some good results if you throw up 2 57s about 3-5 feet from the kit, about 3 feet away parallel from eachother, and about 4 feet off the ground. never tried it though.
That's a technique (or a derivative thereof) that I've been itching to try out lately...Mainly based off of those all-too-frequent instances of an errant 57 or 58 set up as a talkback and smashed that got recorded - and sounded awesome! It was something that has been in the back of my mind to try for a while, and only got serious about it after confiding with a few other engineers who had shared the same experience. Although not necessarily for use as the sole mic's on the kit, I'm interested to hear what would come of it.
Old 18th May 2006 | Show parent
  #8
Lives for gear
 
allaccess's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
I love an LDC over the shoulder of the drummer. which side just depends on how he/she hits the hi-hat... bashers get the right shoulder, using the body to block the hats a bit, finesse drummers get the left shoulder. Pete Thomas told me that the left shoulder was the Joe Meek spot...

Keep in mind that this mic over the shoulder will most likely be out of phase with the kick mic! be sure to check!

I've also had great results in a crappy sounding room with a pair of 57's for overheads and an LDC on the outside head of the kick. the 57s were each the same distance from the snare to keep it centered.

Ryan Hewitt
Old 18th May 2006 | Show parent
  #9
Lives for gear
 
🎧 15 years
I've been getting into mono overhead recording lately. I like the 'over the right shoulder' approach most of the time. A ribbon mic, lightly compressed, works nicely in this approach (been digging the Beyer M160 for this). Sometimes a mic placed just over and behind the drummers head can work or even placed right over the snare drum pointing down. One thing you could try is using that SM57 as a mono overhead. I've been pretty intrigued by the sound of a (carefully) compressed mono dynamic mic as an overhead. Put the Equitek out in front of the kick to catch some 'boom' to fill out the sound. One other thing you could try is placing that Equitek about 6-10 feet out in front of the kit, just a few inches off the floor, pointing up at about a 20-30 degree angle. This turns it into a kind of hybrid kick/room mic. I was recently dabbling with a room mic in this position. I actually ended up placing a piece of pine planking under the mic for an interesting sound. It sounded pretty nice; picks up a really fat kick tone with a warm-ish, somewhat thick room sound. Mixed in with an SM57 mono OH, this could be interesting. Good luck.
Old 18th May 2006 | Show parent
  #10
Gear Nut
 
🎧 15 years
wow..some more really interesting techniques right there! thanks a bunch for those. I wish I had more options, but I think with the omega i can only do 2 mics at once. I will definitely experiment with all of these and I'm excited to see the results, esp. the condensor a little above the floor on an angle to catch mostly kick, but some of the overall drum kit. I'm def. also trying the shoulder idea as well.
Old 21st May 2006 | Show parent
  #11
Here for the gear
 
🎧 15 years
i think it really depends on how the kit sounds. a quiet snare can change everything. but in my experimenting with tuning my drums all different was and recording them, my favorite two mic placement is an overhead and a 57 under the snare. i know that sounds dumb but it really does work. i'll explain: treat the overhead as more of a room mic. keep it close (within 5ft) but either put it in front or in back on the floor tom side. this is to keep the hi-hats from being too loud in the mix. as far as how high, i like to put it kinda even with my head when i'm sitting at the drums. now with the snare mic: use a boom and position the mic about 8 inches below the snare pointing upward but leaning towards the bass drum. i've done a lot in a small room with that. they work well together. everytime i've done overhead and kick the hi-hats were too loud and the snare only had "pop" with no tone. i also dont think that a kick mic mixes well with just an overhead as far as capturing tone or even charisma from the actual drummer. i like the under the snare placement because it picks up what the room mic doesnt get from the snare without sacrificing the kick. you can eq the room to be bright and the snare/kick to be the body orrrrr the opposite. just try the formula and adjust with that placement concept in mind and you'll find some good sounds.
Old 21st May 2006 | Show parent
  #12
Lives for gear
 
🎧 15 years
I'd put the E-100 in front of the kit and use the 57 as an overhead. Compress the E-100 to get a little room ambience if desired. Use just enough of the 57 to balance out the cymbals if necessary. You could even pan the mics a bit to give a little room up the middle.
πŸ“ Reply

Similar Threads

Thread / Thread Starter Replies / Views Last Post
replies: 67 views: 22300
Avatar for Toy Robot
Toy Robot 15th November 2010
replies: 365 views: 135366
Avatar for typical user
typical user 30th March 2019
replies: 1178 views: 264988
Avatar for bill5
bill5 2 weeks ago
replies: 127 views: 12300
Avatar for kiopo
kiopo 2nd October 2012
Post Reply

Welcome to the Gearspace Pro Audio Community!

Registration benefits include:
  • The ability to reply to and create new discussions
  • Access to members-only giveaways & competitions
  • Interact with VIP industry experts in our guest Q&As
  • Access to members-only sub forum discussions
  • Access to members-only Chat Room
  • Get INSTANT ACCESS to the world's best private pro audio Classifieds for only USD $20/year
  • Promote your eBay auctions and Reverb.com listings for free
  • Remove this message!
You need an account to post a reply. Create a username and password below and an account will be created and your post entered.


 
 
Slide to join now Processing…

Forum Jump
Forum Jump