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Mic placement for percussion to accompany main drum take.
Old 4th April 2021
  #1
Lives for gear
 
🎧 5 years
Mic placement for percussion to accompany main drum take.

I was looking to see what people do when recording percussion to add to the main drum kit recording.
What I mean by my question is...

I record a basic standard drum part and like to record loads of experimenting with percussion such as bongos, cowbells, shakers, flexatones, tambourines etc.. I record each separately then edit & mix it with the drums but what I'm wondering is the microphone techniques you'd suggest when recording these parts?

As it is, I have a small dead room which I use to capture close mic drums for a 70s feel. I then simply hit record and leave my spaced ribbon overheads & sit on the drum stool and record various takes of the percussion hits. What I'm starting to think is, that would I be better off recording the individual percussion elements with one mic(mono) so it makes it better for panning etc..
What do you guys do when layering up percussion? Close mic, room mics, mono, stereo pair etc...
Thanks!
Old 4 weeks ago
  #2
Gear Guru
 
🎧 15 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by Muskman ➡️
As it is, I have a small dead room which I use to capture close mic drums for a 70s feel. I then simply hit record and leave my spaced ribbon overheads & sit on the drum stool and record various takes of the percussion hits. What I'm starting to think is, that would I be better off recording the individual percussion elements with one mic(mono) so it makes it better for panning etc..
well you seem to be aware of it as an option and also aware of one of the differences the option can make. IMO, you just need to experiment to see whether you will like it or not. And of course you can always just mute one of the two overheads in the mix and there's your "mono".

I myself tend to record most percussion like shakers, bells, tambourines and so on with a bit of distance. I like to get some room in those sounds. So your overhead technique seems reasonable to me.

A couple of times I did a "multiple exposure" for the percussion parts. That is to say, I set up an XY pair, left it in place, and then for each percussion overdub, I moved my chair from one location to another. Layering all these tracks identically panned kind of presents an image of a bunch of people spread across a "stage". Once I did this outdoors in a field using my laptop and a bus-powered USB interface. Anyway, it might be fun to try.

It is possible that some room other than your dead drum room will be good for percussion, even if that room is too live for a loud drum set.


I do like to get in close on some deeper percussion instruments like congas, for the proximity effect and also for the 'slap' sound of the hand on the head. Sometimes I will add a mic at the bottom of the conga for some deeper tone. But that's not for "stereo". Conversely, I recorded tympani drums a few times and they did not sound right until I was almost 20 feet away. That was on location and the room was big and recording in stereo was 'worth it'.

A lot will depend on arrangement of course. As always, no right or wrong, "it depends" and YMMV
Old 4 weeks ago | Show parent
  #3
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edva's Avatar
 
26 Reviews written
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by joeq ➡️
.......
It is possible that some room other than your dead drum room will be good for percussion, even if that room is too live for a loud drum set.
........
Almost a certainty, IMHO. Percussion loves a live room.
Good luck.
Old 4 weeks ago
  #4
Gear Maniac
 
MAXX VADA's Avatar
 
🎧 5 years
For over dubs i like to close mic skins with a decent condenser mic. Sennheiser e614 is great for high spl close miking or Beyer opus 53.

If you want to get a stereo " effect " from a mono close mic just duplicate the track in your daw and put a small 0.1 ms delay between them then pan left and right.

I like a large diaphragm condenser for mono room. Rode NT2a is really airy and has nice bottom end response.
Old 4 weeks ago
  #5
Lives for gear
 
BIG BUDDHA's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Muskman ➡️
What I'm starting to think is, that would I be better off recording the individual percussion elements with one mic(mono) so it makes it better for panning etc..
yep. thats how i do it, unless its a conga and then i use 2 microphones.

but for general percussion, close mic mono, usually a U87 into an 1176.

easy. Buddha
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