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The Lost Art of Engineering...
Old 27th January 2009
  #1
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Tony Shepperd's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
The Lost Art of Engineering...

Today I was down at Capitol Studios B, recording a choir for the Super Bowl.
16 singers, 6 mics... and one absolutely fantastic sounding studio.

Fortunately the studio manager, Paula Salvatore, was able to slide us in at the last minute.
The engineer who was assisting me was Charlie Paakkari, a great engineer in his own right.
The 8068 Neve in Studio B (signed by Rupert himself) is in pristine condition.
Charlie had two reverbs set up for me. An EMT 250 (send 1) and the live chamber underneath Capitol (send 2) .
I immediately went to the chamber for the choir. After turning up the send a little I looked over at Charlie and said, I love plugins, but you just can't beat the sound of this chamber.
Smooth, Warm and Round can only give you glimpses of the colors of this verb.

Al Schmitt was across the hall mixing in Studio C. He dropped by and we talked for a bit. I hadn't seen him in at least 2 years, but he told me what he was working on and had a moment to catch up.

Recording down at Capitol today started me thinking about the lost art of engineering. It's more than just buying the coolest and hottest boxes. It's knowing the sonic differences between a $100 mic and a $10,000 mic. Each mic can have its place in both the pro and project studios.

Let me say this unequivocally: there is definitely enough room for both pro and project studios.
The purpose of this post is to encourage the art of engineering.
For those of us who spend most of our days in our personal studios, I encourage you to take at least 1 day a month and track at a pro/commercial studio.
Spend a day recording a real piano in a great room. Spend a half a day cutting vocals with a small group in a great room.
Next time you track your project at 24 bit/96k dump those tracks over to an analog tape machine and then bring them back on a new playlist. You can then go back and forth between your analog and digital sound. Drums (analog), Bass (digital), guitars (analog), you get the idea.
I'm sure many of you are doing this already. All I want to do is to start a dialog and bring this more to the forefront.

It's amazing how I miss the camaraderie of having great engineers in the next studio. Simply hanging out in the hallways and discussing the art of engineering.
And yes, at times I do feel like it's becoming a "lost art". I know there will be people who vehemently disagree, that's fine, but have something constructive, not destructive to add to the conversation.

Let's face it. Analog is not going away. Digital is not going away. IMO the future is some kind of hybrid between these two worlds. The same thing can be said about pro and project studios.

This thing we all love to do can get better and better, it is after all an art we all love to practice.
Old 27th January 2009
  #2
Lost and FOUND!

Old 27th January 2009
  #3
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bannerj's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tony Shepperd ➡️
Let's face it. Analog is not going away. Digital is not going away. IMO the future is some kind of hybrid between these two worlds. The same thing can be said about pro and project studios.

This thing we all love to do can get better and better, it is after all an art we all love to practice.
I'm not disagreeing with you. Just want to push back a bit. It sounds like your nostalgia is more about being around pros and being around really nice recording places. That is great. I envy your experiences. Only a small percentage of us have access to these resources. So where does that leave the rest of us? If we are able to stop surfing the web for gear reviews and pinching our pennies together...and if we are able to actually sit down (speaking from my own experience here!) and spend time learning and relearning how to use the gear in front of us, well, that has to be a practice of the "art of engineering" too, right?

Your point about hybrid proves the point here. The art of engineering isn't lost. It is just changing. What is lost is the old days.

I push back because I'm trying to put together a teaching lab/studio here at the college where I work. We are running digital alongside a small Audient board. We've just gotten money to expand our outboard gear. I'm waiting on a bid for a proposal to have a studio designer come in to fully treat out our mixing room. We'll see if in the state of our economy if the administration will give me the money. I want our space to be the best, modest, mixing/tracking space this side of Michigan precisely to provide my students a place of serious learning about the art of engineering, so that they can hang out and experience the same kind of camaraderie you've described.

Similar aim, to sustain the art of engineering--just a different way of going at it.
Old 27th January 2009
  #4
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opentune's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
Well, probably it´s not the Art Of Engineering - probably it´s just the money
that got lost and waits to be found...

Enigneers can´t engineer w/o money.
Old 27th January 2009 | Show parent
  #5
Lives for gear
 
🎧 15 years
Tony, your post reminded me of this:

Quote:
Are Engineers Obsolete?

Back in 1988, I got a call to record the lead vocals for an album. The vocals wouldn't be recorded in a studio, though; the producer had rented a condo and installed a console and Akai 12-track recorder. They only wanted me for one session - to get the vocal settings. When I asked who would be engineering, the producer assured me he was quite capable of punching three buttons: Play, Record and Stop. I bit my tongue and didn't say what I knew to be true: that there is much more to engineering than punching buttons. At the time, I didn't realize that this session marked the beginning of a disturbing trend that continues to escalate.

These days, it seems everybody is an artist/producer/player/programmer/studio owner/and (of course) engineer. Low-cost recording equipment initiated this revolution, and one of the side effects is that engineering may be turning into a lost art. Some artist/producers who put studios in their homes really think that engineers are a luxury, and prefer to spend their engineering budget on equipment. Is an engineer's only contribution to a project knowing when to punch, and how much equalization to add? Does buying better equipment instead of hiring an engineer ultimately produce a better-sounding album? I don't think so.

A great engineer doesn't just make sonic improvements. He or she also provides an experienced second opinion for the artist/producer. An engineer frees up the artist from thinking about technical issues while trying to enhance the creative process. It's simply not possible to give 100 percent of one's attention to the creative and technical aspects of recording at the same time. Biology dictates that we use different hemispheres of our brain for analytical and creative tasks; one or the other will suffer, depending upon our current area of focus.

Is the current state of engineering the result of ego, technology or financial constraints? Some think engineers were necessary "back when we used analog tape and had to worry about tape noise and alignment," asserting that engineers were needed due to primitive recording equipment. These people believe that today's superior recording tools have rendered engineers nonessential. Another factor is shrinking budgets. Many artists who spent enormous amounts of money on studio time and engineers are now buying equipment with the $50K previously budgeted for engineering. This way they are investing in technology, but that investment is not always a "sound" decision.

We should ask ourselves whether we are making better music, and better sounding music, as the result of these changes. History reminds us that string players panicked when string synths appeared, and some thought the LINN drum would threaten drummers' livelihoods. Some commercial studios are still crying about lost business due to home recording. Now it seems the last bastion of expensive high technology, the mastering facilities, are feeling the desktop revolution's financial impact. With each of these successive technological strides, we have gained some things and lost others. Who among us can't tell the difference between sampled and real strings? But financial restrictions discourage spending $5,000 when a $300 synth overdub will satisfy 99 percent of the buyers. Nonetheless, cost isn't everything. The key issue is whether or not we are making better-sounding recordings.

Should engineers reinvent themselves to prove their value? The adage "Diversify or Die," used in the mid-80s to encourage studio owners to broaden their services, seems appropriate for engineers today. Some engineers are setting up workstations for clients, optimizing computers for audio, or getting sounds on a per-project basis. Other engineers are turning to graphics and album artwork or offering editing and mastering services for project recordings. Surround sound and new data-compression technologies also offer new areas where expertise will be crucial.

Ultimately, I strongly believe that the sonic tide will turn. People will realize that the "Emperor's New Digital 8-Track" is not what makes a record sound great, and that inexpensive equipment is a bad substitute for talent and years of experience. Drastic changes are coming in the way we make and mix music and in the technology we use. The future belongs to those who can adapt, and offer services that are perceived as having or adding value. That value must be demanding the absolute best in sonic quality.

I wrote this in 1998 as the opening editorial for EQ Magazine.

By the way, I sat down with one of my mentors just a few weeks ago and we shared similar stories and reminiscences. I did an interview with him back in 1979 about the role of a recording engineer. I should dig it out and listen to what he had to say back then.
Old 27th January 2009 | Show parent
  #6
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vernier's Avatar
 
3 Reviews written
🎧 15 years
Good stuff ...both Tony's post, and Lynn's.

If you don't have large rooms, real chambers, and a world class console ..then using a proper studio is a great idea, if only for a day or two.

Food for thought, anyway.
'
Old 27th January 2009 | Show parent
  #7
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Slikjmuzik's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
I just had a conversation with John Hardy a couple weeks ago where he mentioned he saw an interview with an engineer who says that he would pop up a mic and plug into a Hardy pre with no compressor and just ride gain. He thought this was funny and kept saying 'wow, an engineer that does his job'....I guess that's all true, but I almost never track vocals without a compressor of some kind. To me, since it reacts the same way to signals passing the threshold the same way every time is easier to listen to on a track, to my ears, than an engineer that's trying to learn the part the singer is attempting to crank out. I personally like setting the compressor the right way so that it sounds right to my ears. If for some of the engineers out there, I'm less of an engineer because I am realistic with my human non-ability to compete with an La-2a, then so be it. Not to gripe, but for a studio out of my house, I've got darn usable pres, mics, dangerous summing, killer adam monitors with a sub, pretty decent acoustic treatment. I get the job done in a facility that I'm sure is much more inferioror than the ones guys like Mr. Sheppard who does amazing stuff with Take 6 and many other as well as Al Schmidt who as well needs no introduction, work in. I'd love to have a facility like these one day, but I never will unless I get lucky and that one hit song pays off. In the mean time I'll continue doing small label albums, demo's and EP's.
Old 27th January 2009 | Show parent
  #8
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nukmusic's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
very cool words. same thoughts have been on my mind for a long time.

I don't think its just this craft. People as a whole have changed focus on a lot of things. As technology has expanded over the years, it introduced people to many other things which captured their attentions.(even if just for a moment). We just don't interact like we use to. It could be something as simple visiting someone. Visits turned into phone calls. Calls turned into emails and texts messages.

Conveniency could be to blame? maybe.

ex.
Why go to the movies when I can rent a blue-ray, pay preview, tivo right at home on my 60" LCD with surround sound.

Why spend time & money in a large studio when I can do most of what I need in my project studio filled with top quality gear.

Why have the whole band meet up at so & so's place to create a song when I can record an idea, then email it my band mate and let them add parts until we have a complete song.

etc,
etc,
etc

People as a whole have changed. I do wish we had more old fashion interaction.
Old 27th January 2009 | Show parent
  #9
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vernier's Avatar
 
3 Reviews written
🎧 15 years
Quote:
Why spend time & money in a large studio when I can most of what I need in my project studio filled with top quality gear.
Project studios and real studios, such as Capitol, are completely different. Like night and day.
'
Old 27th January 2009 | Show parent
  #10
Lives for gear
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by Slikjmuzik ➡️
..... an engineer who says that he would pop up a mic and plug into a Hardy pre with no compressor and just ride gain. He thought this was funny and kept saying 'wow, an engineer that does his job'....I guess that's all true, but I almost never track vocals without a compressor of some kind.....
There are those who suspect that the classic art of engineering is on the wane. Maybe....but another thing to consider is that artists' performance chops and microphone technique are not necessarily what they used to be either.

The days of "when tracking, you HAVE to get it right, on both sides of the glass" may be increasingly behind us....for better and for worse, and for a host of reasons. I think what a lot of people miss is the gratifying synergy of professional, seasoned musicians working with professional, seasoned engineers and producers in an optimized environment conducive to creativity.

Hopefully the market will continue to sustain the type of facility where an uncompromisingly high level of engineering craft and technical robustness -- with artists who appreciate it enough to budget for it -- is the non-negotiable standard. If the high-end thrives, the benefits will continue to filter down.
Old 27th January 2009 | Show parent
  #11
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MIKEHARRIS's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
The best engineers & songwriters both do the same thing...they make decisions.

Be confident in your skills & your ears.
Old 27th January 2009 | Show parent
  #12
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nukmusic's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by vernier ➡️
Project studios and real studios, such as Capitol, are completely different. Like night and day.
'
i see u clearly missing the point of that example. People use to do almost everything in larger studios to get a completed song/project. Now-a-days many have the luxury of doing some stuff at larger studios then taking it smaller studios to do more work and still end up with quality. In which case, you might miss out on running into other folks (as Tony said about seeing Al Schmitt) that may be working in other rooms.

limited interaction.
Old 27th January 2009
  #13
Gear Guru
 
drBill's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tony Shepperd ➡️
For those of us who spend most of our days in our personal studios, I encourage you to take at least 1 day a month and track at a pro/commercial studio.
Spend a day recording a real piano in a great room. Spend a half a day cutting vocals with a small group in a great room.
Next time you track your project at 24 bit/96k dump those tracks over to an analog tape machine and then bring them back on a new playlist. You can then go back and forth between your analog and digital sound. Drums (analog), Bass (digital), guitars (analog), you get the idea.
I love Capitol Tony!!!

I guess the problem is finding someone who will pay me to go down there and engineer. Those clients are becoming far and few between I'm afraid. Cherish the moment.....

I'll have to exercise my engineering chops when and where the opportunity arises.
Old 27th January 2009 | Show parent
  #14
Gear Guru
 
drBill's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by vernier ➡️
Project studios and real studios, such as Capitol, are completely different. Like night and day.
'
LOL Not really. Not as different as you might wish.

The last half dozen times I've been there, the Analog tape machines are parked in the hallway with dust on them, while the PT HD rigs are running 24/7.

There are a few pieces of tube outboard though vernier, so you wouldn't be completely unhappy.....

hehhehheh
Old 27th January 2009 | Show parent
  #15
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FadersmakmeHappy's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
The death of the engineer (or really the decline in paying gigs) is related in someways to the death of the music market. Musical acts are under intensive pressure, and most acts in the mid range don't have budgets to do much recording because the indie labels are not moving records. Everyone just slaps their stuff up on Myspace and tries to break thru the clutter.

I think this is a key reason that, IMO, less great records are being made.
Old 27th January 2009 | Show parent
  #16
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Aisle 6's Avatar
 
1 Review written
🎧 10 years
Every statement on this thread is true and correct within it's own context. However, I believe that this same "New Breed", in the box generation, is also slowly realizing that, the new 8 core Mac and Pro Tools, with some serious gear does not make them an Engineer. Of course this conclusion will take a bit of time. After all they are only following a path that the software giants and the retail salesmen have laid before them, promising to deliver world class albums from their bedrooms. Sure it takes time, but they are wising up and saying, why can I not get it right. As Tony Shepperd said, it is the experiences that some of us have had that is lacking. I myself have what I guess you would loosely call a commercial studio. (what does that mean anyway?) I rent an industrial space for the studio, and I am fortunate enough to have another studio right next door. Sure we come up on the same jobs sometimes, but we also work together, have a mutual respect and above all, relish the fact that we have a sense of community, sharing and leaning going on everyday at the office. Everyone who experiences or environment cannot believe it and loves it. I have come to realize that we have a very rare thing. we have gone as far as patching tie lines and ethernet between the 2 studios. Purely for audio of course and not for the odd LAN game. All of this is done with very modest surroundings. Hell, we do not even have a foyer. But we have created what Tony suggested and I cannot recommend it enough. We share on this forum, why not extend that to your own environment as well?
Just a thought.
Old 27th January 2009 | Show parent
  #17
Lives for gear
 
🎧 15 years
Good enough is certainly good enough.

But the the collaborative pursuit of greatness as a matter of course has become an undervalued thing.
Old 27th January 2009 | Show parent
  #18
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Aisle 6's Avatar
 
1 Review written
🎧 10 years
Very elegantly put Mike.
Old 27th January 2009 | Show parent
  #19
Kush Audio
 
u b k's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by MIKEHARRIS ➡️
The best engineers & songwriters both do the same thing... they make decisions
the worst engineers and songwriters make decisions as well, the only difference is in how we judge those decisions. heh

what the best & worst have in common is *they get **** done*. and that, more than talent, more than personality, is one of the key components to success. there are scores of gifted people out there who mistakenly believe talent is the key that opens doors, and they frequently (and predictably) resent the successes of others whom they view as less capable.

ime, relentlesness and a dogged determination in the face of failure will get you 90% of the way to wherever you want to go. add in a dash of skill and a pinch of luck and bob's your uncle.

not sure how any of this related to the discussion, but i've had some coffee and dammit, i need to type.


gregory scott - 'ubk'
.
Old 28th January 2009 | Show parent
  #20
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s.d.finley's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
A friend of mine used to work at the old Hit Factory in NYC. He would tell me how cool it was to see xxx working in the oxford room on the top floor. Or how xxx was working across the hall and he got to meet them, checked out what they were working on and talked shop for a minute.

Being at a world class studio stepped his game up and the interaction among other highly skilled engineering individuals help him to push his own creative envelope, so to speak.

Smaller studios do miss that interaction. Great idea Tony, I wish Houston had a place like capitol tho!!!
Old 28th January 2009 | Show parent
  #21
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Tony Shepperd's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by opentune ➡️
Well, probably it´s not the Art Of Engineering - probably it´s just the money
that got lost and waits to be found...

Enigneers can´t engineer w/o money.
I respectfully disagree, I don't think any of this has to do with money.
I would mix 200 songs a year whether I was paid to or not.

Even when no one is paying you, you should be getting better at your art.
Yes, I know we need money to do the things we need and want, but that's got nothing to do with getting better as an engineer.
Old 28th January 2009
  #22
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robot gigante's Avatar
 
2 Reviews written
🎧 15 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tony Shepperd ➡️
Today I was down at Capitol Studios B, recording a choir for the Super Bowl.
16 singers, 6 mics... and one absolutely fantastic sounding studio.

The engineer who was assisting me was Charlie Paakkari, a great engineer in his own right.
The 8068 Neve in Studio B (signed by Rupert himself) is in pristine condition.
Charlie had two reverbs set up for me. An EMT 250 (send 1) and the live chamber underneath Capitol (send 2) .
I immediately went to the chamber for the choir. After turning up the send a little I looked over at Charlie and said, I love plugins, but you just can't beat the sound of this chamber.
Smooth, Warm and Round can only give you glimpses of the colors of this verb.

Al Schmitt was across the hall mixing in Studio C. He dropped by and we talked for a bit. I hadn't seen him in at least 2 years, but he told me what he was working on and had a moment to catch up.

Recording down at Capitol today started me thinking about the lost art of engineering. It's more than just buying the coolest and hottest boxes. It's knowing the sonic differences between a $100 mic and a $10,000 mic. Each mic can have its place in both the pro and project studios.

Let me say this unequivocally: there is definitely enough room for both pro and project studios.
The purpose of this post is to encourage the art of engineering.
For those of us who spend most of our days in our personal studios, I encourage you to take at least 1 day a month and track at a pro/commercial studio.
Spend a day recording a real piano in a great room. Spend a half a day cutting vocals with a small group in a great room.
Next time you track your project at 24 bit/96k dump those tracks over to an analog tape machine and then bring them back on a new playlist. You can then go back and forth between your analog and digital sound. Drums (analog), Bass (digital), guitars (analog), you get the idea.
I'm sure many of you are doing this already. All I want to do is to start a dialog and bring this more to the forefront.

It's amazing how I miss the camaraderie of having great engineers in the next studio. Simply hanging out in the hallways and discussing the art of engineering.
And yes, at times I do feel like it's becoming a "lost art". I know there will be people who vehemently disagree, that's fine, but have something constructive, not destructive to add to the conversation.

Let's face it. Analog is not going away. Digital is not going away. IMO the future is some kind of hybrid between these two worlds. The same thing can be said about pro and project studios.

This thing we all love to do can get better and better, it is after all an art we all love to practice.
Amen!
Old 28th January 2009 | Show parent
  #23
Gear Maniac
 
lambro's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
A good engineer is like a combination of a surgeon, psychologist and a curator of a nursery.

The trick is when to use which talents and in what combination, and to have those talents in the first place.

Those requirements will never change, even if the artist and engineer are the same person.


The artistic side of engineering requires that something creative and unique (art) is the goal. These days it certainly is not as common commercially, the prime time public tastes are just too dumbed down to accept really artistic music these days. Hence a lot of the engineers having the opportunity to be artistic, are ones out of the mainstream, which is too bad for many of the veterans who pick up the bigger commercial projects.
Old 28th January 2009 | Show parent
  #24
Gear Addict
 
bassman's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
agree and disagree....

Firstly, I agree with so much of what is being said here and am super jealous of environments like LA and NYC where there is so much going on all the time and shoulders can be rubbed everyday like that. I just got through watching that video with Greg Calbi, Kevin Killen and others talking about deep listening and the art of recording. Very worthwhile.....

Deep Listening: Why Audio Quality Matters

But I do have to disagree with your last post, Tony. If I was not getting paid, how on earth could I mix 200 songs a year? That's crazy. For me at least, its a day a song so that's over half of your year gone for free. I've got two kids and several mortgages. How does that add up? I understand the point you are making but its not realistic.

On the other point of community, I am trying to build the same thing here in my neck of the woods. My studio, which is almost done... (yeah, right, that's what I've been saying for an extra 7 months now....) will have two control rooms and a large booth that can double as a third CR in a pinch. My hope is to develop that synergy and sense of musical community for both creative and business ends.

Normally, everyone around here goes to their quiet corner to record and nobody talks or shares anything. At my place, I want them to meet in the kitchen over lunch and see what happens, break down those competitive walls that keep egos in the way and get down to making some great art.... and maybe a buck or two along the way.

As to the original posting question, my vote is that the art is changing and not lost. I am building a business based on the needs of project studios for large ensemble and drum tracking and then mixing on the tail end. I am also trying to put rental packages together so that clients can have more quality in their bedroom overdubs and such. Maybe I'm crazy....... but maybe not.

-bassman
Old 28th January 2009 | Show parent
  #25
Led
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Led's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
I miss the exposure you used to get to a lot of great talent. I was one of the last round of full time assistants in a big shop here. Not only the bonus of meeting/assisting international producers and engineers, but the way bands would all hang out together, and people from one room would drop in a have a lsiten and everyone would bounce off each other creatively. It's impossible to get that in a room by yourself.
I loved the mentor/apprentice relationship you had with a senior engineer, and how you would be taught a craft by a craftsmen on a daily basis. I'm as quick as anyone to say a lot of stuff sounds sub par sonically nowdays, but I also feel for the younger crew starting out now, because for many of them having this sort of learning process is nigh impossible. Not to mention that the mentoring continues on for life if you're lucky. I still call the main engineer I learnt from regularly for advice, and he's always there.
For me music is about a bunch of people having a musical conversation. The conversation has waned a bit now that a lot of music is just one person in a room having a musical conversation with theselves.
Old 28th January 2009 | Show parent
  #26
Lives for gear
 
🎧 15 years
Man, some of those Capitol recordings are my favorites of all time!

But at the same time it was places like Sun, Motown, and Stax that changed the world. I'm sure the folks at Capitol looked down "en petit" at these places.

But there's a good lesson to be had from Tony's post. We need a reference like Capitol or an "anchor" so to speak to keep our heads straight. When we veer off the path of such sonic beauty that came out of that studio, it's a good smack in the head before you really get absurd.
Old 28th January 2009 | Show parent
  #27
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BradM's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
I think forums like Gearslutz have become our "studio hallway" so to speak. I think the communication and interaction is still there, it just takes places in other forms. If anything, the internet has made the dissemination of knowledge about the craft a more free-flowing thing.

I think the idea of physically being around your peers to watch and learn is important and still happens for many of us, even if it's not taking place in an expensive classic studio.

Brad
Old 28th January 2009 | Show parent
  #28
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Empire Prod's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
If it wasn't for the old studio structure I don't think I would be half the engineer I am today. I am very thankful to those who were mentors to me.
Old 28th January 2009 | Show parent
  #29
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carlheinz's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Thats the good side of the NFL production budget.It keeps the B room at capitol open.Iv'e recorded in that room and it forces you to be your best and to do your best work when Frank is looking down on you.
Old 28th January 2009 | Show parent
  #30
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JQ127's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Great thread. I think the biggest thing about the advent of digital recording has been the fact every Tom Dick and Harry has a studio in his basement. And it's cheapened the whole experience. Just the feeling of going in to a studio in the old days was fun. It brought out the creativity. Recording was a special thing. You couldn't just walk downstairs and do it in the basement. You had to save money and earn it. It had 'value' if you know what I'm saying.

Man I remember going in to Perfect Crime Studios in Watertown Mass. years ago. Livingston Taylor was recording there....Jonathan Richman...The Paley Brothers.....and I met all of them there at one time or another. Just a little unknown punk rocker but they were all cool as hell and listened to what my band was doing. It was inspiring. Wonder where Rob Dimit is now....

I still tour in my band to pay the bills and I've contacted a few guys on here about stopping by to check out their studios and have a cup of coffee and talk shop. Maybe not running in to Al Schmitt in the hallway haha but I bet I'll learn a lot.

Thanks for sharing this stuff Tony et al. It's awesome to have you guys around here.......

Joe
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