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Fluid behind Eardrum after virus - - - - - - help
Old 11th October 2011 | Show parent
  #31
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MicDaddy's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
netty pot and saline solution straight up the nose

if you've never done it, it's quite an odd experience at first.

Now any time I feel fluid in my ears, hit the netty pot instead of waiting weeks for it to drain.

If it's behind the ears, the docs may mention seeing bubbles, they may also mention taking sudafed or other for allergies. Some people have tubes installed, some people are able to drain them no problem via other methods.
Old 11th October 2011
  #32
Gear Addict
 
NickNagurka's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Fluid behind Eardrum after virus - - - - - - help

Good Lord, you guys - I thought I was alone in having this problem. I've had it for 4 years in my right ear. I've seen two ENT specialists - one here at the University of Michigan told me there was nothing wrong and that my audiogram came out excellent - no PTS or anything, only mild Tinnitus.

They ordered an MRI to see about the possibility of a tumor (!) luckily, results were negative. I'm scheduling an appointment....again, thanks to all you wonderful people.

This may have been the most useful thing I've ever read on GS, damn!
Old 11th October 2011
  #33
Gear Nut
 
🎧 10 years
on a slightly related topic, has anyone ever used ear cones to remove ear wax? An old girlfriends mom did that for me one time, I was blown away (& disgusted ) at how much crap came out of my ear. I'm talking about the long kind where you actually light the open end away from your ear on fire, creating a vacuum that sucks everything out of your ear. I know that sounds crazy, wouldn't believe it if I hadn't done it myself.
Sent from my DROIDX using Gearslutz.com App

edit reason: typo
Old 11th October 2011 | Show parent
  #34
Lives for gear
 
5 Reviews written
🎧 10 years
So, we're getting a few different things confused here:

1. Wax in the ear canal. Yeah, get it irrigated out by a professional. The ear candle or oil drops or ceruminex might help and they're safe, but don't try anything more agressive. It'll take your doc 5 minutes with the right equipment and it's safe.

2. Eustachian Tube Dysfunction. Can be the result of infection, a cold, an allergy or just bad anatomy and a right in a plane. Most of the time antibiotics do nothing for it except help a little with pain. We still use them a lot because, surprise, there's no easy or always effective solutions. Decongestants, antihistamines, NETI pots, "popping" your nose by breathing out and holding your nose-they all may help. But the swelling at the back of the throat that's plugging the tube has to settle down for the problem to go away. If it won't, then the myringotomy tubes are a decent solution. They rarely result in scarring or serious ear damage, and they do work for adults just as well as kids...

3. Nerve damage. This is primarily viral, although loud noises and sudden pressure can cause it. Not solvable, it gets better if it wants to. THIS you really want to protect against: no guns without serious ear protection, plugs at concerts, monitor at reasonable levels, no water skiing or scuba diving without precautions (like ear plugs-better not to do these at all).
Old 29th January 2012 | Show parent
  #35
Here for the gear
 
🎧 5 years
hyperbaric chamber

I've had my glue ear problem that plagued me for years fixed in a single session in a hyperbaric chamber. I didn't go there for my glue ear, but it was a nice side effect to have that fixed. Cost only USD $80 the whole deal. The glue ear effect was totally gone by the end of the day. You'll spit out the fluid over a few hours and be done with it.
Old 29th January 2012 | Show parent
  #36
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stevelindsay's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by analogdreamer ➑️
You'll spit out the fluid over a few hours and be done with it.
Ewwww, gross, but if they played some bad honky-tonk piano in the background and gave me a spitoon too I'd be all for it!
Old 31st January 2012 | Show parent
  #37
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elamberth's Avatar
 
1 Review written
🎧 10 years
What drbob1 said. He is right on the money. I am a pediatrician and deal with this type of situation daily. I also have had fluid like this in one ear for months and it's quite disconcerting.

Be a little careful with people's recommendations here as several different things can cause a decrease in hearing and a number of people who have posted on this forum seem to have had several very different conditions.
Old 31st January 2012 | Show parent
  #38
Here for the gear
 
🎧 5 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by stevelindsay ➑️
Ewwww, gross, but if they played some bad honky-tonk piano in the background and gave me a spitoon too I'd be all for it!
Well it might sound gross but you do this all the time when having a cold, so what's the big deal? I'll take this over having my eardrum pierced anytime ( http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2MCPhtKtVwk) ...
Old 31st January 2012
  #39
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RonGherkins's Avatar
 
3 Reviews written
🎧 10 years
When I was six I had tubes put in my ears for ear infections, they came out when I was 11, I had my ears sucked out ONCE (with a serious vacuum thing, not like a water syringe) and I've been good for 15 years. Not one of those candles either, the real, medical deal.

+1 ear suck vacuum thing
Old 12th March 2012 | Show parent
  #40
Lives for gear
 
🎧 10 years
While netty pot may be a good practice, users should read this article on it's dangers. It may take the bacteria to your ear and cause an ear infection.

The Neti Pot Danger Explained
Old 12th March 2012 | Show parent
  #41
Gear Maniac
 
MisterMark's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by JackFlashAudio ➑️
on a slightly related topic, has anyone ever used ear cones to remove ear wax? An old girlfriends mom did that for me one time, I was blown away (& disgusted ) at how much crap came out of my ear. I'm talking about the long kind where you actually light the open end away from your ear on fire, creating a vacuum that sucks everything out of your ear. I know that sounds crazy, wouldn't believe it if I hadn't done it myself.
Sent from my DROIDX using Gearslutz.com App

edit reason: typo
Not trying be a negative skeptic, but those ear candles are a bunch of hocus pocus. We did a bit of a scientific experiment with them once to see if the 'stuff' at the bottom of the candle was in fact ear wax.

Pretty simple... burned one ear candle in a cup and burned another one in someones ear. Lo and behold when we cut the thing open the same amount of 'stuff' was in both candles. The 'stuff' is really just the wax from the candle that drips down to the bottom.

As far as fluid in the middle ear due to an infection.... Had this once and it did take a 2 rounds of antibiotics and few weeks to clear up. You basically have to wait for the fluid to drain out of your eustachian tube. It's the tube that connects your sinus passage to your middle ear.

http://www.dizziness-and-balance.com...-Pressure2.gif

From what I understand, the fluid can be pretty thick and that is why it won't easily drain. However, you may help this process along over the weeks by yawning or swallowing a lot. Sorta like what you do when your ears get plugged from flying.

Hope that helps!

-Mark
Old 12th March 2012 | Show parent
  #42
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depulse's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
If you have repeadly blocked ears it can also be caused by allergies.

I never had allergies before. I was flying once, the ears hurt like hell, they did not de-block one I landed and later on fluid came out of one ear. I went to the doctor and it was confirmed the eardrum was ruptured.

Further tests were made and my doctor established that I had allergy that would cause blocking of the auditory (Eustachian) tube that connects the ear and the nose and throat. I now take anti-allergy medicine before flying to avoid further problems.
Old 12th March 2012
  #43
Gear Nut
 
🎧 5 years
I had those tubes posted above inserted into my tympanic membrane(s) when I was very young (2-4 years old, maybe) to reduce the risk and severity of ear infections, as I had been having an ear infection once every few months.

Now I'm in my 20's and a year or two ago I noticed the tympanic membrane on my left year moving in and out as I breathed in and out, respectively.

I think this was caused by loud music tearing the tympanic membrane where scar tissue had healed over. I think because I have that scar tissue I am more susceptible to tears in the tympanic membrane.

It isn't affecting my hearing much, but it is annoying as hell when breathing, especially trying to go to sleep at night. I notice it is worse after long studio sessions.

To combat this, I am now wearing an ear plug for at least a few months so it can fully heal, and then I'll be very careful about dB levels. With an earplug in, there is less vibration of the tympanic membrane which allows for a faster healing process.

I am not a doctor so I don't actually know if this is correct diagnosis or treatment.. but I know for a fact if you've had those tubes in your ears as a child you will have scar tissue formation on the tympanic membrane which will lead to susceptibility to further damage later in life.
Old 12th March 2012 | Show parent
  #44
Lives for gear
 
🎧 10 years
I'm not a doctor, but sounds more like a problem with the eustachian tube being open rather than torn tympanic membrane.

Patulous Eustachian tube - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

You're right about tubes creating scar tissue on the membrane. Scarred tympanic membrane won't be as agile as a "fresh" one. You may hear differently with an scarred membrane, not necessarily worse, just different.

Maybe check with a doctor, using ear plugs is a good idea in general, but may not help with the tube?
Old 12th March 2012
  #45
Gear Nut
 
Flux Capacitor's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Fluid behind the drum sucks. I've been suffering with it on and off since 2002. On Jan 2007 I woke up from a nap. When I pitched my head down I felt fluid slide deep into my left ear, screwing up my hearing. Since then I've had nothing but problems. Lost a good deal of my hearing in my left ear because of it.

Sometimes it would get better by itself, and for a few months it seemed to have resolved itself, but last summer I got pulled over on the 4th of July weekend because my tail light was out. When I went home, I checked the light, and while I pitched my head to see one of the screws I had to undo to take out the burned bulb, my left ear was pointed up towards the ceiling, I again felt the rush of fluid sink in.

Going on 9 months now dealing with this crap. Right now its tolerable, but I have to constantly adjust balance settings on any audio device. If you can adjust balance numerically on your computer (windows 7 in my case), adjust the left channel to 50, and the right to 35 and see how it sounds. THATS what I have to use to get fairly balanced audio. Cant listen to music in my car anymore because even if I adjust the balance on the left side it still feels off, as if the speakers arent working.

I cant even bend over to look down to pick something up, because if I do the fluid will shift and I'll spend the rest of the day with muffled hearing. At least right now its tolerable, the fluid seems to settle in a better place after a full night of sleep. I cant even sleep on my right side because the fluid will easily slide in deeper and I'll be miserable. Its like sticking a finger in your left ear. Try it, and try talking or breathing. Its awful. I have to resort to squatting in order to pick things up, or reach something deep in the refrigerator to get something.

Unfortunately I have no health insurance so I cant get it fixed. I've been to the ENT a few times to get my ears cleaned out because of wax build up. I had tubes put in when I was a kid so I've always had ETD. The ENT tells me its gonna cost 4-5k to get a tube put in, but I just dont have the cash.

For those of you who've had tubes put in in adulthood, how was it? How do they anesthetize the drum? Its pretty uncomfortable when they shoot water into the ear to clear out wax, and pretty damn painful when the doc goes in with a pick to clear out the deep stuff that the water cant remove, so how bad is it when he has to actually puncture the ear drum? Im told its an in-office procedure, but do they sedate you in anyway?
Old 12th March 2012 | Show parent
  #46
Lives for gear
 
1 Review written
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by depulse ➑️
If you have repeadly blocked ears it can also be caused by allergies.

I never had allergies before. I was flying once, the ears hurt like hell, they did not de-block one I landed and later on fluid came out of one ear. I went to the doctor and it was confirmed the eardrum was ruptured.

Further tests were made and my doctor established that I had allergy that would cause blocking of the auditory (Eustachian) tube that connects the ear and the nose and throat. I now take anti-allergy medicine before flying to avoid further problems.
Makes me wonder if one can have a sort of "sub-clinical" Eustachian tube problem, and then big pressure changes like flying or loud music set it off.
Old 13th March 2012
  #47
Gear Addict
 
telejustin's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Dealing with the fluid issue since late last summer. It totally blows. It sounds like some people have dealt with worse than what I have. I don't think my hearing has been affected. Any time I think I'm having a L/R balance issue I check on headphones and the vocal is dead center. My mixes don't seem to be unusually bright so I think maybe I'm adjusting.

In talking with my Mom about this I found out that I used to have chronic childhood infections and that I had the ear tubes. I never knew!

So far my doc has had me try a course of antibiotics (which did nothing), Flonase nasal spray, Mucinex and Neti Pot saline rinses. These things sometimes get the gick loosened up enough that I hear fluid moving around in the eustachian tubes but little to none ever comes out.

I just started a 5-day course of prednisone along with an antihistamine regularly. My doc is hoping that all will reduce the inflammation enough to let them drain as the docs here have discussed.

My other tactic has been transitioning to a gluten-free diet. I have a friend who had life-long persistent sinus issues that cleared up when she stopped eating gluten. Gluten is inflammatory for a lot of people and I've wondered if there might be a connection for me. I've been pretty good staying on the diet but occasionally slip up. So far this hasn't fixed anything but I'm hoping after a couple of months there will be a difference. I'd really like to avoid the myringotomy if possible.

Good thread. Hope the exchange of ideas helps out the community!
Old 14th March 2012 | Show parent
  #48
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RKrizman's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
Don't assume the worst. Sometimes it just takes awhile for these things to clear up. Maybe another round of antibiotics if your doc still sees infection. Otherwise, try using Sudafed or some of the other decongestants regularly for awhile.

Good luck,
-R
Old 14th March 2012 | Show parent
  #49
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PdotDdot's Avatar
 
1 Review written
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by telejustin ➑️
Dealing with the fluid issue since late last summer. It totally blows. It sounds like some people have dealt with worse than what I have. I don't think my hearing has been affected. Any time I think I'm having a L/R balance issue I check on headphones and the vocal is dead center. My mixes don't seem to be unusually bright so I think maybe I'm adjusting.

In talking with my Mom about this I found out that I used to have chronic childhood infections and that I had the ear tubes. I never knew!

So far my doc has had me try a course of antibiotics (which did nothing), Flonase nasal spray, Mucinex and Neti Pot saline rinses. These things sometimes get the gick loosened up enough that I hear fluid moving around in the eustachian tubes but little to none ever comes out.

I just started a 5-day course of prednisone along with an antihistamine regularly. My doc is hoping that all will reduce the inflammation enough to let them drain as the docs here have discussed.

My other tactic has been transitioning to a gluten-free diet. I have a friend who had life-long persistent sinus issues that cleared up when she stopped eating gluten. Gluten is inflammatory for a lot of people and I've wondered if there might be a connection for me. I've been pretty good staying on the diet but occasionally slip up. So far this hasn't fixed anything but I'm hoping after a couple of months there will be a difference. I'd really like to avoid the myringotomy if possible.

Good thread. Hope the exchange of ideas helps out the community!
I am going through the exact same thing. I got my first cold in 10 years about a month ago. Ever since, my left ear has been listening to a constant choir of lave and rice crispies. I had my ears cleaned - nothing. I took amoxycillin - nothing. Just finished steroids - nothing. I go see the Dr again in 2 days. If she does not come up with a game plan I'm going to try VooDoo. On occasion, I seem to lose a small bit of high end in the left ear for short spells but over all, the hearing is fine - just those danged crispies.

Old 15th March 2012 | Show parent
  #50
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PdotDdot's Avatar
 
1 Review written
🎧 10 years
In the interest of sharing, I went to my Dr again today. I am now on Cipro, Sudafed (15 mg) a day, Fexofenadine. It seems she thinks t is a sinus infection. I will let you know the results when the meds are completed.

I have already had my ears cleaned, amoxycillin, Nasal Spray and Steroids - all to no avail.

My condition appears to have started as a result of a cold I got about 2 months ago. First cold I've had in over 10 years. No idea whether it was the cold or simultaneous allergies but I am hopeful the new cocktail will do it.

More shall be revealed....
Old 15th March 2012 | Show parent
  #51
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5 Reviews written
🎧 15 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by PdotDdot ➑️
I am now on Cipro, Sudafed (15 mg) a day, Fexofenadine.
only a doctor will give you 3 ototoxic meds to heal an ear problem
Old 15th March 2012 | Show parent
  #52
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PdotDdot's Avatar
 
1 Review written
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by robertshaw ➑️
only a doctor will give you 3 ototoxic meds to heal an ear problem
Indeed! LOL Well as far as Doc's go, she's actually pretty cool and usually does right by me. We shall see. If I don't get the crispies exorcised I'm gonna lose my mind.
Old 16th August 2012 | Show parent
  #53
Gear Addict
 
telejustin's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Wow. So here's my update and maybe it's helpful to someone else.

After nothing working with my primary doc (drugs, neti pot, steroids, etc) I went to an ENT. My hearing test came back totally normal. He then did an endoscopy (scary!) and said my eustachian tubes look totally fine. Diagnosis?

TMJ!

It turns out that crackling/fluid noises just below your ear are a common symptom of TMJ and can be confused with fluid and problems in the ear. I don't grind my teeth as confirmed by my dentist, but I must be clenching while I work. Now I'm very aware how tight my jaw is, basically from stress.

Anyway, if you're struggling with this perhaps this is something to consider!
Old 17th August 2012 | Show parent
  #54
Lives for gear
 
🎧 10 years
I had an ear infection earlier this year, first got sinusitis which I'm guessing travelled to ear because I used netipot wrong (blew too hard).

Inflammation goes quickly away with antibiotics, but I too was left with fluid behind eardrum. My cure was to sleep in a slightly upright position, it took about a week to partially open and then it just went off from there, no other meds needed than the initial antibiotics. I read it might be best to just let gravity do the work, so that the fluid naturally moves away.

I don't know if it was this trick only, but it sure was a lot easier than I'd remembered. It takes a bit of getting used to to sleep in a semi-sitting position, but I think it was worth it.
Old 17th August 2012 | Show parent
  #55
Gear Head
 
🎧 10 years
I usually get a really bad cold once or twice a year resulting in fluid behind the ears. I tried out heaps of things and then one day stumbled on these little blue demazin pills that contain pseudoephedrine. Now when ever my ears get blocked i take these pills and my hearing will be clear within the day.
Before i took the pills my blocked hearing would last up to about 6 weeks.
Old 17th August 2012
  #56
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shortstory's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
I recommend 3 months rest on the beaches of Majorca. Should dry it up & take care of it.
Old 17th August 2012 | Show parent
  #57
Gear Head
 
🎧 5 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by drbob1 ➑️
So, we're getting a few different things confused here:

1. Wax in the ear canal. Yeah, get it irrigated out by a professional. The ear candle or oil drops or ceruminex might help and they're safe, but don't try anything more agressive. It'll take your doc 5 minutes with the right equipment and it's safe.

2. Eustachian Tube Dysfunction. Can be the result of infection, a cold, an allergy or just bad anatomy and a right in a plane. Most of the time antibiotics do nothing for it except help a little with pain. We still use them a lot because, surprise, there's no easy or always effective solutions. Decongestants, antihistamines, NETI pots, "popping" your nose by breathing out and holding your nose-they all may help. But the swelling at the back of the throat that's plugging the tube has to settle down for the problem to go away. If it won't, then the myringotomy tubes are a decent solution. They rarely result in scarring or serious ear damage, and they do work for adults just as well as kids...

3. Nerve damage. This is primarily viral, although loud noises and sudden pressure can cause it. Not solvable, it gets better if it wants to. THIS you really want to protect against: no guns without serious ear protection, plugs at concerts, monitor at reasonable levels, no water skiing or scuba diving without precautions (like ear plugs-better not to do these at all).
I have the dubious pleasure of checking all three of these catagories!

The wax issue is no problem at all, if you discount an occasional week's wait to unblock a wax build up. The dry suction process isn't the most pleasant procedure in the world but it's over in less than a minute and hearing those high frequencies come rushing back in is well worth the discomfort.

I've been suffering from a recurrant infection for the best part of three years now. Sometimes it's just a little uncomfortable, sometimes it causes loss of hearing to the point where conversation is a struggle. I have a good local ENT specialist and local antibiotic (rather than oral) generally kicks it into the long grass, but it always reappears within a few months. I suffer from ME, the result of a bout of pneumonia a few years back, so my immune system is fairly vulnerable to infections and viruses, but still this has got me tearing my hair out.

But the nerve damage is the worst as there's no real hope of improvement. I have an 80% hearing loss in my right ear from a childhood illness, and now a 10% loss in the left with a scary drop off over 4-5K. Incidentally, audiologists will often report this (the left ear not the right) as normal as it has little impact on general social interaction - it was only after I asked to see the results and stressed the importance of my hearing for work that I found out my high frequency response was so poor.

The infections could have played a part in the high frequecy loss but I was warned that 10 years of playing in indie bands without earplugs was an equally likely candidate - so I wonder how many of us who come from a player's background have a lot less going on up top than we'd like to think.

The only plus point to this is that even with my impaired hearing I'm remarkably still able to perform well in various functions of music making. I deal in violins for work and am able to make accurate judgements about the tone of expensive instruments. I can still arrange and perform music very well, and although I prefer to let other people mix for me I can still turn in something reasonable if I have to. I can only guess that there's a lot to psychoacoustics that allows my brain to figure out what information is missing.

So, touch wood, I'm still doing ok. I guess I'll just keep on going until people tell me I can't do it anymore. At which point I won't be able to hear their criticisms anyway...
Old 17th August 2012
  #58
VST
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VST's Avatar
 
4 Reviews written
🎧 5 years
I didnt read the thread so apologies if this was mentioned. My doctor did it once to me, after an ear infection; hurt like hell. Not sure if it did much in my case, but i'm told it works well for others.

EarPopper - Earache, Ear pain, and Ear Pressure Relief Device
Old 7th April 2013
  #59
Gear Addict
 
🎧 10 years
i've been having fluid in my left ear for 2 months and after visiting a couple doctors and spending probably a hundred hours of research I've come to conclude that my upper wisdom teeth (which I've scheduled to take out in a month) has led me to have TMJ which I believe has been the reason for my Eustachian tube dysfunction which has been keeping the fluid in my ear. Is this logically correct?

Also, I was wondering if anyone has been suffering from I guess what you call hyperacusis where there's this over sensitivity to sound? My left ear has this spasm pulse like sound after hearing certain frequencies and is also induced when I talk. So if I make a cling sound with a dish, it just spasms. Is this our body's way of telling us that we have fluid in our ear? It's really annoying and I'm hoping it'll go away after I take the rest of my wisdom teeth out...
Old 7th April 2013 | Show parent
  #60
Gear Addict
 
telejustin's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Khan ➑️
i've been having fluid in my left ear for 2 months and after visiting a couple doctors and spending probably a hundred hours of research I've come to conclude that my upper wisdom teeth (which I've scheduled to take out in a month) has led me to have TMJ which I believe has been the reason for my Eustachian tube dysfunction which has been keeping the fluid in my ear. Is this logically correct?

Also, I was wondering if anyone has been suffering from I guess what you call hyperacusis where there's this over sensitivity to sound? My left ear has this spasm pulse like sound after hearing certain frequencies and is also induced when I talk. So if I make a cling sound with a dish, it just spasms. Is this our body's way of telling us that we have fluid in our ear? It's really annoying and I'm hoping it'll go away after I take the rest of my wisdom teeth out...
I ain't no doc but here's my understanding...

The TMJ crackling and fluid is a totally separate issue from the eustachian tube dysfunction/inner ear fluid. They just happen to be right next to each other.

If you see my earlier post above I went to an ENT thinking I had blocked eustachian tubes. He did a nasal endoscopy and said my eustachian tubes looked fine and diagnosed me with TMJ, a total surprise. A couple of massage therapists and a PT have said my TMJ isn't that bad, so I've definitely wondered about whether that ENT doc was a hack. Sometimes things open up and I can feel some drainage, so I think I have both issues.
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