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Tip for Fixing a Molded Plug! - Gearspace.com
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Tip for Fixing a Molded Plug!
Old 11th September 2012
  #1
Lives for snowflakes
 
12ax7's Avatar
 
๐ŸŽง 10 years
Tip for Fixing a Molded Plug!

.
This morning a keyboard player woke me up with an emergency:

He was leaving town for a gig, and his main keyboard had stopped working.
"Sometimes it turns on, and sometimes it doesn't. Sometimes it'll just quit working while I'm playing. Can you fix it?"
...Turns out that the problem was an intermittent connection INSIDE the molded plug of the wall-wart power supply.
So I looked through my junkbox for a connector I could splice onto the end of the cable so he could get back in business...
NO DICE!
...So I very carefully carved open the molded plug, cut the wires, and tack-soldered the connections directly onto the now-exposed metal.
Well, I guess we've ALL had to do something like this from time to time just to make something work in a pinch - but as we all know, there's not much chance of it lasting very long (especially on stage).

Of course, one of the problems with doing this (aside from strain-relief being a problem) is that a molded plug that has been cut apart has near-zero integrity, and has not much chance of lasting very long in a gigging situation. (Maybe not even the whole night.)

Another problem is that molded plugs tend to be made from pliable plastic, and any attempt to use epoxy, glue, silicone, and/or tape to "cheese" things into place always seem to fail in a hurry.

...So out of desperation, I hit upon the idea of using a product called "Shoe Goo" (sold for shoe repair).
Shoe Goo - Wikipedia
I used this stuff not only to glue the tape onto the plug, but also to fill and replace the plastic I had cut away from the molded plug. ...Then I coated the whole damn thing with the stuff (except for the actual business-end of the plug - the part that actually makes contact with the jack).

It looks like it may actually work long enough to not only get him through the gig, but maybe even buy him enough time to be able to get a replacement before it fails!

(I'll let ya know how it works out.)
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Old 11th September 2012
  #2
Lives for gear
 
Richard Crowley's Avatar
 
๐ŸŽง 10 years
Good to know.

Another possible fix is going to your nearest RatShack and finding a plug (from their collection of several dozen sizes) that fits the device. Then chop off the intermittent plug and solder the wires onto the replacement plug pins (observing proper polarity OF COURSE!) This makes a pretty good "permanent" fix where a proper replacement power brick or wall wart is no longer available.
Old 13th September 2012 | Show parent
  #3
Lives for snowflakes
 
12ax7's Avatar
 
๐ŸŽง 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by rcrowley โžก๏ธ

Another possible fix is going to your nearest RatShack and finding a plug (from their collection of several dozen sizes) that fits the device. Then chop off the intermittent plug and solder the wires onto the replacement plug pins (observing proper polarity OF COURSE!) This makes a pretty good "permanent" fix where a proper replacement power brick or wall wart is no longer available.
Yep.

I've done that before, and was actually gonna go back and do exactly that to this one.

...But as it turns out, the plug on this thing is pretty weird. (I've never seen one before.)

Looks like the plug on this thing is proprietary to his instrument.

He's gonna price a replacement unit. If it's not devilishly expensive, he says he'll buy one and keep it around for when his present one fails.

By the way, the report he gave me today was that it worked for the whole gig, and appears to be just fine (for now)!

I haven't seen it since he took it out for the gig, but he tells me that although its a bit ugly lookin', it seems to be pretty solid.

...Looks like Shoe Goo has earned a place in my "goopage arsenal".
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Old 17th September 2012
  #4
Lives for gear
 
๐ŸŽง 10 years
There's also a 2-part epoxy mix intended for repairing rubber / plastic parts, mainly for automotive use - engine mounts,accordion air hoses, dashboard parts etc. It sticks to just about anything, and sets to a hard rubber consistency. It is very tough, I used it a lot to repair the soles of my childrens' shoes when they were at an age where they would scuff holes in them in a matter of weeks. I have also used it for exactly the job you did - fixing proprietary plugs after cutting them open. I discard the cut-open plastic, and cut and fit a piece of heat-shrink to form a mold. I fill the mold with enough epoxy to cover the connections, then heat-shrink the rest to form a strain relief around the cable.

The brand I use is Pratley Wondafix Car:
Pratley High Performance DIY Adhesives
Old 17th September 2012
  #5
Lives for gear
 
๐ŸŽง 10 years
ShoeGoo saved a pair of my shoes too =D My dad was using it for everything for a while. That stuff, Gorilla Glue, liquid electrical tape. All good stuff to have around.
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