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100v to 110v power with synth
Old 8th September 2012
  #1
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Roland Marckwort's Avatar
 
1 Review written
🎧 5 years
100v to 110v power with synth

Hi,

can I safely use a Japanese synth (100v) in Canada (110v) or is a transformer a must?
will I fry the power supply otherwise?

thanks!
Old 8th September 2012
  #2
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Richard Crowley's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
What does the nameplate say? Since you didn't identify the equipment, we are unable to do any research for you.

Many modern power supplies are "universal" and will operate from 100 to 240 volts and 50 or 60 Hz.
Old 8th September 2012
  #3
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abechap024's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
I have that exact type of transformer to get rid of if you need one....

And yes if its a "switching" power supply. It should be fine. If its what they call a "linear" power supply, it will probably work just fine, but will get a bit hotter then it was probably designed for and things might burn out faster. But Im sure the power supply is regulated somewhat so it *shouldnt* burn anything up.

Especially since if you figure it runs on +/-15V and uses a step down transformer to get 16V or so, when you calculate it and feed it 110V you only get about a one volt or two so increase to 17.25V.
Any properly designed power supply should be able to eat an extra volt or two with not significant problems.

Use this advice at your own risk!!
Old 8th September 2012
  #4
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Roland Marckwort's Avatar
 
1 Review written
🎧 5 years
sorry its a Yamaha cs15 synth, 1979.
don't have it here, apparently it isn't a universal supply....
Old 8th September 2012 | Show parent
  #5
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Roland Marckwort's Avatar
 
1 Review written
🎧 5 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by abechap024 ➑️
I have that exact type of transformer to get rid of if you need one....

sounds good what are you asking?

And yes if its a "switching" power supply. It should be fine. If its what they call a "linear" power supply, it will probably work just fine, but will get a bit hotter then it was probably designed for and things might burn out faster. But Im sure the power supply is regulated somewhat so it *shouldnt* burn anything up.

Especially since if you figure it runs on +/-15V and uses a step down transformer to get 16V or so, when you calculate it and feed it 110V you only get about a one volt or two so increase to 17.25V.
Any properly designed power supply should be able to eat an extra volt or two with not significant problems.

Use this advice at your own risk!!
Old 8th September 2012 | Show parent
  #6
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Lotus 7's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by abechap024 ➑️
I have that exact type of transformer to get rid of if you need one....

And yes if its a "switching" power supply. It should be fine. If its what they call a "linear" power supply, it will probably work just fine, but will get a bit hotter then it was probably designed for and things might burn out faster. But Im sure the power supply is regulated somewhat so it *shouldnt* burn anything up.

Especially since if you figure it runs on +/-15V and uses a step down transformer to get 16V or so, when you calculate it and feed it 110V you only get about a one volt or two so increase to 17.25V.
Any properly designed power supply should be able to eat an extra volt or two with not significant problems.

Use this advice at your own risk!!
All true, and fine if the "110 volt line" is actually 110 Volts. In the US, Canada and most of North America, the nominal voltage is actually "120 volts" (108.4 to 129.6 limits) and where I live is always between 122 and 128 volts except on the hottest summer days when the A/C loading drops it to 118 or so.

If the power supply is a linear supply it may be "pushing things" if the line is on the high side. If the voltage actually measures 115v. or less, there's probably no problem, but there is a good possibility it's actually a lot more, so a transformer might be in order.

Any modern modular supply should have an input voltage range spec on the case somewhere, or possibly the manufacturer of the device can be contacted to confirm the safe range.

Most "older" Japanese electronics are designed for 90 to 111 volt operation. If the line is actually 115, it's probably safe as stated above, but if your line actually measures 125 or 128v. (like mine) you are probably 'tempting fate".

Beware of any electronic smoke that is released from your power supply or the synth. It's REALLY hard to get it all back into the cases if you loose any.
Attached Thumbnails
100v to 110v power with synth-us-line-voltage-standards.jpg   100v to 110v power with synth-line-voltage.jpg  
Old 9th September 2012
  #7
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Richard Crowley's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
The manual says:



http://soundprogramming.net/manuals/...-15_Manual.pdf

This device appears to have not only a built-in power supply, but a captive power cord as well.
The manual does not mention a "Japanese 100V model" at all. Perhaps published in Japanese only.
Personally, I would NOT simply assume I can plug a Japanese 100V device into North American power.
When I have tried it in the past (a 1st generation Sony CD player), it resulted in very troubling
overheating and possible damage.
Old 9th September 2012
  #8
Gear Maniac
 
Tallowah's Avatar
 
🎧 5 years
Many "older" electronic units are 110v rated! U.S mains is ~120v, not sure about Canada though. If it's an external PSU, replace it if you're that worried, or get a step down (variac etc..). I can't tell how many 110v PSU's I use and my mains is usually ~122+v. As long as you don't leave it plugged in indefinitely, it shouldn't result in anything more than a little extra heat.

`
Old 9th September 2012
  #9
Lives for gear
 
🎧 15 years
Hi
The 'manual' extract says most of what you need to know.
You or a tech should open it up (power lead disconnected of course) and look at the area where the mains goes to the transformer where there is most likely further instructions with connection points for 'assorted' voltages or explicit printing of 120 Volts.
If it really IS a 100 Volt ONLY model then an auto transformer or replacement of the existing one would be sensible to avoid any damage to the unit.
Matt S
Old 9th September 2012
  #10
Here for the gear
 
🎧 5 years
As an electrician, we have always had a rule of thumb that 10% up or down is OK. So you are probably allright. Another thing you may need to watch is the Hertz. Again, if it is rated for 50 Hz., it will work on a 60 Hz. line but not the other way around. You can always buy a variac and dial in the voltage exactly, like Eddy Van Halen . If there is a lot of smoke, you can just say it is part of the show.
Old 10th September 2012
  #11
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waveterm's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
Your CS15 will only have 100VAC input since it is being imported from Japan. Domestic sold products of that era from Yamaha are only 100VAC.

Get a stepdown transformer.

WT
Old 7th April 2013
  #12
Gear Head
 
🎧 10 years
I have a related question so I'm hijacking this thread. I have a Roland System 100 model 101 with the Japanese power supply. Upon looking at the service manual (see below for links) this info was presented [102 manual]:

Power Transformer
No. 86C (022-086C) - - - ( 1 00V-1 20V)
No. 86D (022-086D) - - - (220V-250V)

Power Supply Board Assembly
PS- 22 ( 1 46-022) - - - ( 1 00 V- 1 20V)
PS-24 (146-024) - - - (220V-250V)

I opened up my 101 and indeed it has the 022-086-C linear transformer.

Does this mean that I can run it on my 110v stepdown transformer or do I need to by *another* stepdown just for 100v?

Cheers

[Links]
102 service manual
System 100 Service Manuals
Old 7th April 2013
  #13
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Lotus 7's Avatar
The service manual (pp.3) states the synth can operate on "100 - 120 v 50-60 Hz". That does not mean it can be directly powered from a mains input range of 100 TO 120 volts without adjustment.

The power transformer pf this synth actually has a tapped primary (see pp. 11) that can be set for a nominal Japanese standard line voltage of 100 volts (90 to 111 volts) or a nominal North American mains voltage of 120 Volts (108 to 128 volts).

If it's currently set for Japan (nominal 100 volts), the transformer primary tap must be changed.

For Japan, the mains line power is applied to the White and Brown transformer wires,
For North America, the power is applied to the Red and Brown wires.

Since the actual voltage on most North American wall outlets is above 111 volts, you should change the lead going to the transformer primary. You can then run it from a 120 volt outlet with no external step-down transformer. The fuse can remain at the normal value of 1 Ampere.

If you don't feel competent to change the transformer tap, and don't have anyone to do it for you, you can safely power the synth through an external 120:100 volt step-down transformer, although just changing the transformer tap is a better option.

Plugging it into a 120 volt outlet, when set for 100 volts is not a good idea for the many reasons discussed previously in this thread.
Old 7th April 2013
  #14
Lives for gear
 
🎧 10 years
The higher US voltage does unpredictable things to Japanese equipment.
Old 28th December 2014
  #15
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🎧 5 years
Japan's 100v V8 Zoom multi recorder import and US 120v

I have been reading the thread above and thank you for this information...I am probably asking the same question but I need to know..I am buying a Japanese import it is a Zoom 8 multitrack recorder...I ask the merchant in Japan what was the power connection...he said it was 100v and also he said I could run it from a USB port on my computer or run it with batteries. Should I buy this recorder? If you recommend a step down transformer where would I buy such a device and about how much does it cost. I purchased the device because it was substantially cheaper then purchasing it from US. I hope I haven't made a mistake I still have time to cancel if I get a fast reply. Thank you in advance for your reply.
Old 29th December 2014 | Show parent
  #16
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🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ron110 ➑️
I have been reading the thread above and thank you for this information...I am probably asking the same question but I need to know..I am buying a Japanese import it is a Zoom 8 multitrack recorder...I ask the merchant in Japan what was the power connection...he said it was 100v and also he said I could run it from a USB port on my computer or run it with batteries. Should I buy this recorder? If you recommend a step down transformer where would I buy such a device and about how much does it cost. I purchased the device because it was substantially cheaper then purchasing it from US. I hope I haven't made a mistake I still have time to cancel if I get a fast reply. Thank you in advance for your reply.
well looking at the back of the mrs-8. you would have to get a 9VDC 300mA tip is negative (-) dc supply. a universal dc walwart that is at least 300mA and can be selected for 9V will work.
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