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Berklee Online School of Music
Old 17th November 2010
  #1
Registered User
 
🎧 10 years
Berklee Online School of Music

I was just wondering what everyone's thoughts were on online music classes. I have never cared for online classes or school in general very much, and I truly believe that school is mostly not necessary when it comes to studying any form of art.

But that's just me... I ****in' hate school and teachers etc.

But, I was wondering if there are people here who have found online classes helpful beyond just info that you can find in a book or online.
Old 17th November 2010
  #2
Registered User
 
🎧 15 years
I was never fond of school either. I've taken a few online classes and was never too impressed with them...just assigned readings, essays with minimal feedback, and some quizzes/tests. I looked at the Berklee thing before, and it seems kind of like a borderline scam...really expensive classes for no hands on training or teaching...I could be wrong though.
Old 18th November 2010 | Show parent
  #3
Registered User
 
🎧 10 years
How expensive are the classes?
Old 18th November 2010 | Show parent
  #4
Lives for gear
 
Johnny Favorite's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
If you enroll on a jazz composition class you pay 1,295 dollars. 12 weeks.
Old 18th November 2010 | Show parent
  #5
Lives for gear
 
Turdadactyl's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
I'm in the middle of my second course online with Berklee. The courses are definitely expensive, but they are very good. I guess whether they are over-priced will be determined on whether your potential increase in income or pure enrichment justify "expensive." I'm not a professional songwriter, so I suppose the music theory course I took and the melody course I'm currently taking better make my songs feel $2000 better to me over the course of my lifetime.

Money aside, I do find that the courses are a VERY good way to avoid posting online asking "what book should I read" and 6 book suggestions later still taking a stab in the dark, reading the wrong book the first 4 times (or not even getting through it) and then still having questions. The theory class was full of stuff I really wanted to/should know. The melody class is geared at songwriting and really has had a lot of "aha!" moments for me...even in the first week. I've taken several tidbits out of it that have really made me more comfortable with my weakest spot, which is writing vocal melodies.

As far as the materials and instruction, I've found the melody class materials to be a little more "thrown together" and a little less detailed than the theory class. I suppose that's a function of the teacher who put them together. I've had to put a tiny bit of extra web-sleuthing in once or twice to get terms that weren't as clear as they should be. Generally though, the materials are good. The instructors seem to be receptive/responsive across the board.

Bottom line...I think the classes are REALLY expensive, but I think they're good. Just like any brick and mortar school, the quality of the classes and teachers will vary. They've been a good way to build a little musical human capital, if nothing more.
Old 18th November 2010 | Show parent
  #6
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Turdadactyl's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by Johnny Favorite ➑️
If you enroll on a jazz composition class you pay 1,295 dollars. 12 weeks.
It's a little cheaper if you don't do it for credit.
Old 18th November 2010 | Show parent
  #7
Registered User
 
🎧 10 years
To each his own. I believe in education... but it takes all forms.

In my earlier life, I collected pieces of paper. Diplomas, business licenses, etc... I could fill a drawer... if I had bothered to keep them.

Now, I find myself for the first time being so completely engaged by something that I can't wait to learn something new every day. For me, it's jazz composition. A super condensed course from the ground up in general music theory and beyond.

I took one theory class in college, and never showed up in class or cared about the boring assignments. I learned a lot it college... but most of it wasn't from classes. Despite being debatably overeducated, I find that MOST of what I know on nearly every subject has come from my own curiosity and paying attention whenever a learning opportunity presents itself.

I've looked at various online options, local community college, etc.

Here's my take, though. I've learned more in the past year on GS than I did in a year at Full Sail back in the day. The tuition has been somewhat less to boot.

I wanted to learn about credit a couple years back, and could write a book with what I learned in a few thousand posts on creditboards.com.

I have a few other examples, but I feel in general like the internet is a complete game changer. If I wanted to study 12 hours a day, I could find enough material online, at my local library, etc... to last until I couldn't stand it any more.

So, for me... I've located a dozen or so books. Most are WAY beyond me at the moment, but I've already worked through a few. As I continue working on my solo album, I spend a couple hours each day REGIMENTED purely for the study of theory and composition. I read. I do the exercises. NOTHING interferes with that time. In under a month, I've written stuff I couldn't even conceive of, let alone create prior to opening Pandora's box.

The pace I am learning at is far beyond anything any class could offer, but it is so because of my focus.

So what's the point of all the rambling? It's a brave new world. The best education in the world (short of personal interaction with a master in your field) is available to anyone with the drive to seek it. However, that road requires that you be a self starter.

If you do, as another poster mentioned, waste time debating which book to read rather than reading, then by all means enroll in something... anything... to get going.

It is truly amazing, though, how many forums there are out there with world class knowledge there for the having if you only look... and ask... and study... and look... and ask... and study.

Amazing times.
Old 18th November 2010
  #8
Registered User
 
🎧 10 years
Berklee Online School of Music

I dropped out of their music business certificate because all it consisted of was telling me to read certain pages out of books I already owned. Namely passman's 101 things you need to know about the music industry.
I was less than impressed with my investment
Old 18th November 2010 | Show parent
  #9
Registered User
 
🎧 10 years
the Critical Listening class they offer is pretty on point. I recommend it.
Old 18th November 2010 | Show parent
  #10
Registered User
 
🎧 10 years
I'm presently taking my last class in the masters certificate for "Music Production Using Pro Tools" program. I'm the type of person that does well in a class setting and mostly enjoyed school. Knowing the way I learn best, being married with a kid, and busy, pointed me in the direction of online classes. For me, it's been a very rewarding experience. I only started getting hardcore about audio production in the last 4 years, and I knew I needed help to take my learning to the next level. When I started, I had a working knowledge of Pro Tools, but I felt the program was so deep I needed/wanted detailed guidance. After taking Pro Tools 101, 110, advanced Mixing and Mastering, the mastering course, some classes on Reason, and a few more, I feel way more knowledgeable and comfortable using Pro Tools, recording and mixing. I understand how to use the program way better, and I can get good results a lot faster and easier. That's partly a result of learning how to use the tools better and from improving my ability to listen and understand what I hear better. I think that if you are interested in learning about software, online is a great way to go. If you are taking guitar classes or instrument classes, it may not be what you need. I say that because, I took a jazz guitar class, and I learned a lot, but I know I personally learn better with people in the room to vibe off of and ask questions to directly. I took a lot of lessons and this method worked out great for me. Anyway, for learning about the ins and outs of programs and other software I think it's been great. I also learned a ton of tricks and approaches in the mixing and mastering and advanced mixing and mastering classes. It is expensive, and some of the classes have parts that aren't as useful as other sections, but overall I'd say that it's been a great experience for me. I really got a lot out of the Pro Tools, Mixing & Mastering, and Reason courses. Good stuff. However, to the the OP, if you don't like taking classes and hate school and teachers, I don't know if I'd recommend this approach for you. Still, the classes I mentioned are in my opinion, really well organized and jam packed full of great information. My experience is just that though, my own, so YMMV. Hope I could help. If you have any questions, shoot. Cheers. - paul
Old 18th November 2010
  #11
Lives for gear
 
🎧 15 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by godofmetal ➑️
I was just wondering what everyone's thoughts were on online music classes. I have never cared for online classes or school in general very much, and I truly believe that school is mostly not necessary when it comes to studying any form of art.
Sounds like you already made up your mind...

Anyway, I wouldn't spend a lot of money on any musical online course offering. Do your own research. Buy the books or scoure the 'net. Hire a local private instructor. All cheaper and more informative. The course work was only a part of the Berklee experience - one you'll never get typing on a computer hundreds or thousands of miles away...

You can buy a book about Taekwon-Do, but you'll never really understand it unless you go to class and actually train with an instructor and work/interact w/other students.
Old 18th November 2010 | Show parent
  #12
Registered User
 
🎧 15 years
I think 6strings put it well. If you have a place to live and food to eat, I would say don't waste your money on online education, but spend it on some recording gear/instruments and work hard on your own recording/playing/learning. I think that would be your best bet.

I ended up going to school for television, got a job, and am now making a lot of music whenever I'm not working. I'm pretty happy with my choice, but it may not be what you want to do.
Old 18th November 2010 | Show parent
  #13
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Nighthawk77's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by Johnny Favorite ➑️
If you enroll on a jazz composition class you pay 1,295 dollars. 12 weeks.
These video courses are a MUCH more affordable alternative and FOCUS on production:

Mixing Masterclass
Mixing for Beginners
Mixing Engineers Reference
Old 18th November 2010 | Show parent
  #14
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Turdadactyl's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by 6strings ➑️
You can buy a book about Taekwon-Do, but you'll never really understand it unless you go to class and actually train with an instructor and work/interact w/other students.
This is the reason I think online classes are better for songwriting technique or theory than they are for instruction on an instrument. In the melody course, for example, I take what I learned from a lesson, write a song or song section that uses that, record it, upload it and get audio feedback from the teacher and written feedback from classmates. Works fine for that. I wouldn't expect it to be too beneficial for guitar instruction or something like that.
Old 23rd February 2016
  #15
Registered User
 
🎧 5 years
Berklee Online Vocal Courses

I have participated to the Berklee Online Courses and took a 12 week course called "Rock and Pop Vocal" and I DONT RECOMMEND AT ALL to anyone. I am sorry to say this but if you dont want your money to be waisted, invest some other kind of music lessons, or techs.

Saying this, I am performer for a long time, I play flute, I sing and I work with several bands. I wanted to ammeliorate my technique and I wanted to be taught by the best! Berklee was such a name for me. I even checked a lot of online comments and reviews before signing to it. But well, I so regret my decision.

Instead you can work with a live vocal coach, take courses on skype even. they work much better than Berklee Online Vocal Courses.
Old 23rd February 2016
  #16
Registered User
 
🎧 15 years
Of course, I am highly against "courses" because I learned the craft of recording and production well before there were schools that claimed to teach the stuff.
I also taught for a while at a recording school.
I won't name the school, but it is a "name" school.
It wasn't worth the money even if I personally tutored you.
I moved to another position because I felt guilty and didn't want to be associated with something that took money from people and implanted false hope.
Of my 20 or so students, I got one guy a job in the dub room of a radio/TV production facility I worked for.
I liked the guy and thought he had a good attitude, so when my old boss asked me if I knew of anyone I suggested this guy.
I have no idea how he did in the long run.
He got his foot in the door at a facility where I earned a decent salary for nine years.

I have seen a few people go on to have a career, but the school (usually Full Sail) only gave them a rudimentary understanding of the business and the craft as a whole.
They succeeded because of their own strengths.
The courses they took had very little to do with their success.

I have little respect for Berklee as it is.
I could name many reasons, but the fact that they offer "vocal lessons" on video just proves that they are shameless.

You can't learn to sing by watching people sing!
You can WATCH people singing everywhere on TV.
Singing is a physical experience and you absolutely must have a vocal coach physically show you how to work your instrument.
Yeah.. they had to touch you.
The BS they show on the videos is at best stolen from university level textbooks.
Either hire real vocal coach or line the pockets of shameless teachers and schools.

If you want to get a music degree that MATTERS in the real world you need to go to a university where simply paying the required tuition DOES NOT guarantee that you graduate.
You see, EVERYONE who pays the required fees and passes the classes gets a diploma at Berklee.
At real music university you don't advance until you meet the performance expectation.
If you don't perform good enough you don't advance.
If you are not good enough you don't get a diploma.

I short, you can buy your degree from Berklee and some schools.
The schools where you diploma means something (ie. will get you hired to REAL job) they don't give you a degree unless you actually are quite good at your chosen instrument.
There is a BIG difference.

Also, computers being used in production have been a license to steal for mail order schools.
I don't want to hurt anyones feelings, but if you pay money to learn how to use ProTools you are crazy.
Buy it... DO IT!
Sink or swim.
Old 23rd February 2016
  #17
Registered User
 
🎧 5 years
Hey if you have face book check out this page
https://www.facebook.com/mgmfee

i will continue to work on it and add charts and so on about frequencys scales and uses
Old 25th February 2016
  #18
Registered User
 
🎧 5 years
Well I took a Berklee online course through Coursera on Ableton taught by Erin Barra and I have no complaints...but it was free (it only costs if you want a certificate):
https://www.coursera.org/learn/ableton-live
Old 25th February 2016 | Show parent
  #19
Registered User
 
🎧 5 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by mikefellh ➑️
Well I took a Berklee online course through Coursera on Ableton taught by Erin Barra and I have no complaints...but it was free (it only costs if you want a certificate):
https://www.coursera.org/learn/ableton-live
intresting

thank you
Old 25th February 2016
  #20
Lives for gear
 
brill bedroom's Avatar
 
2 Reviews written
🎧 10 years
As a graduate of the B place, I am sure they are trying to monetize the brand with their online courses, which is not to say the info isn't solid and some people could really benefit from that kind of structured course. The information is out there for free, but a lot of people do better with formal instruction.

The real value of Berklee as a brand is being there with people who are going to go on to work in the music industry and having real relationships that can lead to opportunities. In the past few weeks, people I went to school with won a few Grammys, are in the Top 40, are on major international tours and played sax on David Bowie's last album. You don't get that from an online course, I'm afraid.
Old 27th February 2016
  #21
Registered User
 
🎧 5 years
I start in April for a Bachelor Degree in Music Production...but I see they have a dual major in Production/Business that may be available.

Yes, it's expensive paper but it's likely going to fill holes that I currently don't even know are in my game. Also, I'm all about getting Pro Tools certified simply because it's pretty much like a required language these days. One thing I'm psyched about is how hard I kicked the music theory placement test's ass. I get to START with 300-level theory courses.

By the end of this I'll be about 60K in the hole, but it will be my only debt load since my home and acreage are already mortgage free. At this point in time, Berklee Online is a no-brainer for me.
Old 21st June 2018
  #22
Here for the gear
 
🎧 5 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by godofmetal ➑️
I was just wondering what everyone's thoughts were on online music classes. I have never cared for online classes or school in general very much, and I truly believe that school is mostly not necessary when it comes to studying any form of art.

But that's just me... I ****in' hate school and teachers etc.

But, I was wondering if there are people here who have found online classes helpful beyond just info that you can find in a book or online.
HAHAHA~~!!! YOU CRCK me up!!! I do both and have learned that actually school will get you lifetimes ahead....a no brainer...

A simple fact = it ha already been proven so that you move ahead....

Now it depends......where you are at and what exactly you want to learn....

I can help you with that...
Old 21st June 2018 | Show parent
  #23
Here for the gear
 
🎧 5 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by lovgig ➑️
I have participated to the Berklee Online Courses and took a 12 week course called "Rock and Pop Vocal" and I DONT RECOMMEND AT ALL to anyone. I am sorry to say this but if you dont want your money to be waisted, invest some other kind of music lessons, or techs.

Saying this, I am performer for a long time, I play flute, I sing and I work with several bands. I wanted to ammeliorate my technique and I wanted to be taught by the best! Berklee was such a name for me. I even checked a lot of online comments and reviews before signing to it. But well, I so regret my decision.

Instead you can work with a live vocal coach, take courses on skype even. they work much better than Berklee Online Vocal Courses.
Love gig....it appears you are advanced so you need to take advanced courses at Berklee.....then I can assure you you will meet your match...AND what is cool is you get get a good Prof learn years with him.her

The only thing is that as the course get more advanced then most of those professors do not care about the students anymore.....so choose wisely..
Old 21st June 2018 | Show parent
  #24
Here for the gear
 
🎧 5 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by brill bedroom ➑️
As a graduate of the B place, I am sure they are trying to monetize the brand with their online courses, which is not to say the info isn't solid and some people could really benefit from that kind of structured course. The information is out there for free, but a lot of people do better with formal instruction.

The real value of Berklee as a brand is being there with people who are going to go on to work in the music industry and having real relationships that can lead to opportunities. In the past few weeks, people I went to school with won a few Grammys, are in the Top 40, are on major international tours and played sax on David Bowie's last album. You don't get that from an online course, I'm afraid.
Yes you do.....it all depends on your talent and the Prof to want to do something with you.

I found BOL awesome and got experience that too 40 years....or so but a great deal of effort and had great professors that cared n shared their knowledge....

But also I got a couple of so that teaching is a pain for them. Simple put

So I guess it is all about how you make it happen....
Old 21st June 2018 | Show parent
  #25
Here for the gear
 
🎧 5 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by kelverde ➑️
I start in April for a Bachelor Degree in Music Production...but I see they have a dual major in Production/Business that may be available.

Yes, it's expensive paper but it's likely going to fill holes that I currently don't even know are in my game. Also, I'm all about getting Pro Tools certified simply because it's pretty much like a required language these days. One thing I'm psyched about is how hard I kicked the music theory placement test's ass. I get to START with 300-level theory courses.

By the end of this I'll be about 60K in the hole, but it will be my only debt load since my home and acreage are already mortgage free. At this point in time, Berklee Online is a no-brainer for me.
BOL is awesome if you make it hard and want to learn......you should get your Protools certification....but honestly that does not give you anything unless you can use it and show that you are able....

I would use that money and effort on BOL instead. BUt then again is that is really what you want for for it...but you will have to pay n re take it...

I'd say save the money n buy gear with it.
Old 21st June 2018 | Show parent
  #26
Here for the gear
 
🎧 5 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by brill bedroom ➑️
As a graduate of the B place, I am sure they are trying to monetize the brand with their online courses, which is not to say the info isn't solid and some people could really benefit from that kind of structured course. The information is out there for free, but a lot of people do better with formal instruction.

The real value of Berklee as a brand is being there with people who are going to go on to work in the music industry and having real relationships that can lead to opportunities. In the past few weeks, people I went to school with won a few Grammys, are in the Top 40, are on major international tours and played sax on David Bowie's last album. You don't get that from an online course, I'm afraid.

Brill I agree with you but the real value that really cements you , it is you and your talent and the ability to keep on improving and learning from everybody...especially from those professors
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