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what's really the fastest way to learn piano?
Old 8th March 2014
  #1
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what's really the fastest way to learn piano?

i have no background in piano, but i would like to learn .. is there any software or books that i should take a look at?

please aware me. thanks!
Old 8th March 2014
  #2
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Circuit3's Avatar
 
🎧 5 years
Fastest? Really?

What type of music/style you want to be able to play?
Old 8th March 2014
  #3
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🎧 5 years
congratulations for one of the most stupid questions I saw on gearslutz....
Old 8th March 2014
  #4
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Acid Mitch's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Start reading about scales ,intervals and chords and play as much as possible as soon as you can. Maybe even find a tutor and take weekly classes.
Play and study for a few hours a day and you'll learn it in no time.
Old 8th March 2014 | Show parent
  #5
SDC
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🎧 5 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by sgventil ➑️
congratulations for one of the most stupid questions I saw on gearslutz....
Congratulations for one of the most stupid answers i saw on gearslutz....
Old 8th March 2014 | Show parent
  #6
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🎧 5 years
thanks!

Quote:
Originally Posted by SDC ➑️
Congratulations for one of the most stupid answers i saw on gearslutz....
Old 8th March 2014
  #7
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Sotsirc's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Check out Piano with Willie, a website with video lessons etc. Good stuff.
Old 8th March 2014
  #8
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xanderbeanz's Avatar
 
🎧 5 years
I'd say the most effective way is one on one lessons, the teacher can find out your strengths and weaknesses and then adapt to maximise your potential whilst also avoiding any bad habits (learning correct scale fingering and where to cross over etc)

They will also be able to show you which pieces are good for practicing different techniques. You will find that in a lifetime of learning, different teachers will impart different wisdoms upon you which add to the rich tapestry of your musical life. I for example, started off on the Technics Pop Keyboard Course (Now defunct) which taught you sequencing and technology as well as standard music reading, left hand right hand stuff, scales, chords etc, then I did my classical grades for a couple of years (I was 17 and there were like 9 year olds in the exams! It pays to be rich if you wanna start young!) but I hated that world (although I still love orchestral music now, Stravinsky & Debussy in particular) and hated sheet music, it was always painful and playing by ear was 100 times easier, so I rebelled and started taking Jazz piano lessons from a Blind guy named Clyde.

I'm thinking of taking up my jazz again because I know enough to impress people but there are seriously guys out there who are 10 times better than me. Would also like to learn a wind instrument, maybe clarinet.

If you're gifted you should be pretty awesome within 2-4 years, if not it'll take longer.
Old 8th March 2014 | Show parent
  #9
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mahuska's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by xanderbeanz ➑️
I'd say the most effective way is one on one lessons, the teacher can find out your strengths and weaknesses and then adapt to maximise your potential whilst also avoiding any bad habits (learning correct scale fingering and where to cross over etc)

They will also be able to show you which pieces are good for practicing different techniques. You will find that in a lifetime of learning, different teachers will impart different wisdoms upon you which add to the rich tapestry of your musical life. I for example, started off on the Technics Pop Keyboard Course (Now defunct) which taught you sequencing and technology as well as standard music reading, left hand right hand stuff, scales, chords etc, then I did my classical grades for a couple of years (I was 17 and there were like 9 year olds in the exams! It pays to be rich if you wanna start young!) but I hated that world (although I still love orchestral music now, Stravinsky & Debussy in particular) and hated sheet music, it was always painful and playing by ear was 100 times easier, so I rebelled and started taking Jazz piano lessons from a Blind guy named Clyde.

I'm thinking of taking up my jazz again because I know enough to impress people but there are seriously guys out there who are 10 times better than me. Would also like to learn a wind instrument, maybe clarinet.

If you're gifted you should be pretty awesome within 2-4 years, if not it'll take longer.
This, or do the Bill Murray Groundhog's day thing
Old 8th March 2014
  #10
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xanderbeanz's Avatar
 
🎧 5 years
He really shreds on that Korg M1 XD
Old 8th March 2014
  #11
DCW
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🎧 15 years
Old 8th March 2014
  #12
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damondarkwalker's Avatar
 
🎧 5 years
Cybernetic implants, but they're costly.

Seriously though, if you don't want to pay for lessons there are tons of videos on YouTube. Then practice.
Old 8th March 2014
  #13
DCW
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🎧 15 years
Practice accompanying yourself to your favourite songs, working out the chords by ear.
Old 8th March 2014
  #14
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pinkerton's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Practice more, learn quicker.
Old 8th March 2014
  #15
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iksrazal's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
To learn jazz standards, I sometimes use midi files played in a piano roll skin of Timidity. You can print sheet music from those files also.

That is arguably the fastest way. And also playing scales until you are blue in the face.
Old 9th March 2014
  #16
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aaeronn's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
find a good teacher and take lessons

then practice, practice, practice
Old 9th March 2014
  #17
Gear Head
 
🎧 5 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by lip5016 ➑️
i have no background in piano, but i would like to learn .. is there any software or books that i should take a look at?

please aware me. thanks!
I think I saw a program that shoots rays from your monitor and injects the piano knowledge directly into your brain. Maybe you can find a torrent.
Old 9th March 2014
  #18
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skira's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Fastest improvement in piano would probably come from a good teacher who could tailor lessons to your specific goals and interests, and instill good posture and playing technique. In NYC group lessons are around $45/class, and good private lessons start around $65/hour although I know a well-known concert pianist who gives lessons to wealthy clients for $150/hour.

After that it's up to you to study and practice. A lot. and then some more.

Easy, right?
Old 9th March 2014
  #19
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pandar's Avatar
 
🎧 5 years
This wont "teach" you piano but it will help. Synthesia, Piano for Everyone
The most important thing is to know theory so you have some idea why notes are being hit but all the same being able to hit them is important as well
Also find fingering chart for scales so you not only hit the key but do so with the correct finger so you have fingers readily avalible for the next note.
Old 9th March 2014
  #20
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HamHat's Avatar
 
🎧 5 years
Lessons for constructive feedback and to help one actually practice. Also practice one hour a day EVERY DAY! I have only been playing piano for a year and I know all the scales, can sight read at a decent level, music theory became more natural, etc.
Old 9th March 2014 | Show parent
  #21
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🎧 5 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by HamHat ➑️
Lessons for constructive feedback and to help one actually practice. Also practice one hour a day EVERY DAY! I have only been playing piano for a year and I know all the scales, can sight read at a decent level, music theory became more natural, etc.
A year? That's way too long. People like OP want a 1 week program (if that), and will quit learning the microsecond they feel they know just barely enough. Save your breath.
Old 9th March 2014 | Show parent
  #22
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login's Avatar
 
2 Reviews written
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by aaeronn ➑️
find a good teacher and take lessons

then practice, practice, practice
this
Old 9th March 2014 | Show parent
  #23
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🎧 5 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by Machiavellian ➑️
A year? That's way too long. People like OP want a 1 week program (if that), and will quit learning the microsecond they feel they know just barely enough. Save your breath.
That's a dick thing to say. What makes you think the OP won't stick with it?

To the OP, I think it's important to find a teacher who is willing to supplement your standard lessons with some Pop (or whatever music you're into) songs/standards from time to time. This way you won't get bored playing dinky little practice tunes and will instead be able to at least start playing the chords to songs you like.

Once you can play triads in every key and know basic voice leading, you can move on to 7th and 9th chords. This will give you a reasonably rich harmonic vocabulary with which to start composing your own songs (or at least their chord progressions).
Old 9th March 2014
  #24
Deleted 0dfcc1b
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Scales, arpeggios, Hannon exercises, and Bach.

You should get some lessons too. Unlearning bad form is a pain.

Spend about 10 hours a week minimum with weekly lessons for about 6 months if you're totally green.

No shortcuts, practice your ass off
Old 9th March 2014 | Show parent
  #25
Deleted 0dfcc1b
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gadget Fiend ➑️
That's a dick thing to say. What makes you think the OP won't stick with it?

To the OP, I think it's important to find a teacher who is willing to supplement your standard lessons with some Pop (or whatever music you're into) songs/standards from time to time. This way you won't get bored playing dinky little practice tunes and will instead be able to at least start playing the chords to songs you like.

Once you can play triads in every key and know basic voice leading, you can move on to 7th and 9th chords. This will give you a reasonably rich harmonic vocabulary with which to start composing your own songs (or at least their chord progressions).
That's solid advice too but if they learn the fundamentals while understanding the emotion capacity of Bach...

You could play anything.
Old 9th March 2014
  #26
BM0
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1 Review written
🎧 10 years
Training your fingers to work independently with strength and control can only come by practice. Hanon Virtuoso Pianist focuses on fingering technique but doesn't teach anything musical. For musical, standard classical and some pop repertoire should be included with your training. I also recommend Bartok Mikrokosmos. It focuses on common technical challenges while learning about different modes, timing signatures, etc. It is best to work with a good instructor that will make sure you are using proper form. I would not recommend doing Hanon without proper instruction. Learning improper technique will only get you so far when it comes to playing piano music. As mentioned, unlearning bad form can take time on its own.
Old 9th March 2014 | Show parent
  #27
Gear Maniac
 
🎧 5 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by peter_martin ➑️
That's solid advice too but if they learn the fundamentals while understanding the emotion capacity of Bach...

You could play anything.
I can't remember who said this. But it was something to the effect that the kernel to every great pop song is already present in the music of Bach. So yeah, you can't go wrong with Bach. Plus, I actually think his 2-part Inventions are a lot of fun to play (and are great for developing hand independence). I should go practice now... :-)
Old 9th March 2014
  #28
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7Wave's Avatar
 
🎧 5 years
I think the first thing to do is define what you mean by "learn."

I've known pianists who were taught to play the piano while reading music, but they couldn't play or figure out a piece of music by ear to save their lives. They learned to play what was written on a page, but it didn't necessarily develop their ear or their awareness of what was going on musically in a piece. They also usually lacked any compositional skills.

I've also known pianists who didn't (or didn't prefer to) read music but could play just about anything by ear.

I started playing piano about 40 years ago. Here's my advice.

- Be a self starter and start off with pieces you like; develop skills by building a repertoire. It's fine to get a teacher if you like, but if you already play another instrument, you should be able to get pretty far on your own. It *is* important to learn hand posture, scales, chords, arpeggios, etc., but I'd recommend *not* burying yourself in all of that in the beginning. If you play music that you like to hear, it'll motivate you to keep going.

- Start by teaching yourself the melody of a piece, playing it one note at a time. Do it by trial and error. Learn to zero in on a pitch. Try to avoid finding the sheet music or looking up a youtube video to figure out the notes.

- Now listen for the bass line, and figure it out note by note. Again, do it by ear, and play it with your left hand. You're now doing two things: (1) learning to isolate the parts of a piece of music by hearing them, and (2) how to locate a pitch by ear. These are both very useful.

- So your first step was to identify and play a melody and bass line. Now practice playing them together at about a quarter or half tempo. Just one note at a time with your left hand for the bass, and one note at a time with your right hand for the melody.

- Next you'll want to learn chording. The good news is that the spacings between notes for all chords of a type (major, minor, 7, etc.) follow a consistent geometry. Learn the basic chord shapes in what are called triads, which are three note chords. One of the basic shapes, for example, involves playing every other white key with the root at the bottom. To play C major in root position, put your thumb on middle C (or any C for that matter), your middle finger two white keys above that (E), and your pinky two white keys above that (G).

- Now notice that if your fingers stay in the same position, you can move your entire hand up one step and you're playing a D minor chord. Move up one more step and you're playing E minor. One more (actually a half step at the root from E to F) and you're playing F major. Up one more full step and you're playing G major. Up another and you're playing A minor.

- With this you can play six chords right off the bat with just one chord shape. When I was five years old (1973), one of the first songs I learned on my own was "Lean on Me" by Bill Withers, by starting with C major in root position with my left hand playing bass an octave below the root of each chord. In the process I had taught myself a bunch of basic chords by just replicating the same shape with different roots.

- Another common shape is found in D major. Thumb on D, middle finger on F sharp, pinky on A. Now you can use that same shape for E major and G minor as well.

- Once you know the chords in a piece of music, you can also play them in triads with your right hand and simple bass with your left hand (often the root of the chord you're playing) while you sing the melody. This is a common starting point for figuring out a song on your own.
Old 9th March 2014 | Show parent
  #29
Gear Maniac
 
🎧 5 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by 7Wave ➑️
I've known pianists who were taught to play the piano while reading music, but they couldn't play or figure out a piece of music by ear to save their lives. They learned to play what was written on a page, but it didn't necessarily develop their ear or their awareness of what was going on musically in a piece. They also usually usually lacked any compositional skills.
That's been my experience as well. There were people in my college music classes who could play circles around me on the piano. But they were lost without a sheet of music in front of them. However, this isn't to say that music lessons will turn you into a "piano bot." You just have to be clear about what your goals are.

If you want to learn to play in order to start writing music (or get better at writing music,) then practicing Hanon exercises 3 hours a day is probably not the best use of your time. Instead, as 7Wave suggests, spend more time learning by ear to play the pieces of music you like.

Having said that, I still think it's a good idea to find a teacher who understands your goals and can help you achieve them. If the teacher says, "There is only one way to learn to play keyboards" then find someone else.
Old 9th March 2014 | Show parent
  #30
Gear Guru
 
1 Review written
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by Deleted 0dfcc1b ➑️
Scales, arpeggios, Hannon exercises, and Bach.
this is what I said in my first post.. but I also called them morons ... I was kidding.. oops.
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