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what's really the fastest way to learn piano?
Old 9th March 2014
  #31
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Crandak's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
Not recommended but this is probably the fastest way.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G7ywpFqsp9o
Old 9th March 2014 | Show parent
  #32
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BobTheDog's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by 7Wave ➡️
I think the first thing to do is define what you mean by "learn."

I've known pianists who were taught to play the piano while reading music, but they couldn't play or figure out a piece of music by ear to save their lives. They learned to play what was written on a page, but it didn't necessarily develop their ear or their awareness of what was going on musically in a piece. They also usually usually lacked any compositional skills.

I've also known pianists who didn't (or didn't prefer to) read music but could play just about anything by ear.

I started playing piano about 40 years ago. Here's my advice.

- Be a self starter and start off with pieces you like; develop skills by building a repertoire. It's fine to get a teacher if you like, but if you already play another instrument, you should be able to get pretty far on your own. It *is* important to learn hand posture, scales, chords, arpeggios, etc., but I'd recommend *not* burying yourself in all of that in the beginning. If you play music that you like to hear, it'll motivate you to keep going.

- Start by teaching yourself the melody of a piece, playing it one note at a time. Do it by trial and error. Learn to zero in on a pitch. Try to avoid finding the sheet music or looking up a youtube video to figure out the notes.

- Now listen for the bass line, and figure it out note by note. Again, do it by ear, and play it with your left hand. You're now doing two things: (1) learning to isolate the parts of a piece of music by hearing them, and (2) how to locate a pitch by ear. These are both very useful.

- So your first step was to identify and play a melody and bass line. Now practice playing them together at about a quarter or half tempo. Just one note at a time with your left hand for the bass, and one note at a time with your right hand for the melody.

- Next you'll want to learn chording. The good news is that the spacings between notes for all chords of a type (major, minor, 7, etc.) follow a consistent geometry. Learn the basic chord shapes in what are called triads, which are three note chords. One of the basic shapes, for example, involves playing every other white key with the root at the bottom. To play C major in root position, put your thumb on middle C (or any C for that matter), your middle finger two white keys above that (E), and your pinky two white keys above that (G).

- Now notice that if your fingers stay in the same position, you can move your entire hand up one step and you're playing a D minor chord. Move up one more step and you're playing E minor. One more (actually a half step at the root from E to F) and you're playing F major. Up one more full step and you're playing G major. Up another and you're playing A minor.

- With this you can play six chords right off the bat with just one chord shape. When I was five years old (1973), one of the first songs I learned on my own was "Lean on Me" by Bill Withers, by starting with C major in root position with my left hand playing bass an octave below the root of each chord. In the process I had taught myself a bunch of basic chords by just replicating the same shape with different roots.

- Another common shape is found in D major. Thumb on D, middle finger on F sharp, pinky on A. Now you can use that same shape for E major and G minor as well.

- Once you know the chords in a piece of music, you can also play them in triads with your right hand and simple bass with your left hand (often the root of the chord you're playing) while you sing the melody. This is a common starting point for figuring out a song on your own.
Nice post.
Old 10th March 2014
  #33
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aaeronn's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by lip5016 ➡️
i have no background in piano, but i would like to learn .. is there any software or books that i should take a look at?

please aware me. thanks!
software and books can certainly get you started, but if you are serious about learning piano, find a teacher that specializes in whatever you're interested in - classical, jazz, improv, or just the basics (etc... )

I took lessons for 8 years from the same teacher (4th though 12th grade) - mostly focused on classical but flexible enough to work with whatever I was interested in playing (with some input from Mom )

It's quite liberating to turn off the electronics and just play piano.
Old 10th March 2014
  #34
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marino's Avatar
 
2 Reviews written
🎧 5 years
Piano teacher here. It's impossible to give proper advice without at least having some words about your goals, available time, etc..
But there's one important thing that needs to be stated as a general premise:
Don't rely on books or videos. You need a teacher who watches you during your initial steps and advices about posture, hand position, and sound production.
If you don't do that, you could (I didn't say "will") pick bad habits in the way you play, and those could lead to tendonitis and other VERY annoying diseases. I've seen this hundreds of times.
In case you're wondering, I'm not seeking work for myself, as I (probably) live in a different continent... heh It's just honest, informed, important advice.
Good luck with your piano studies!
Old 10th March 2014 | Show parent
  #35
Lives for gear
 
🎧 5 years
I have a friend who tried studying piano, and gave it up as he found it too difficult. I tried to teach him, but he was a lousy student.

The first lesson, was "Chopsticks". A perfectly suitable piece of music for a novice IMO.

So, I hand him the chopsticks, one chopstick held in his right hand playing on the 'g' note, the other chopstick held in the left hand playing on the 'f' note. I properly told him to stand up straight, and "angle the arms down". He could barely make it to the d + b part without botching it.

Needless to say, he was a HORRIBLE student.

HORRIBLE !
Old 10th March 2014 | Show parent
  #36
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Arglebargle's Avatar
 
🎧 5 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by peter_martin ➡️
That's solid advice too but if they learn the fundamentals while understanding the emotion capacity of Bach...

You could play anything.
When we were studying Bach (my one year in music school), we charted out some of his pieces, and discovered that if you look closely at them, including the passing tones, they formed jazz chords.

You could never convince me that Bach didn't hear those relationships. There just wasn't the structure to describe or assimilate them then.

I shoulda practiced scales more though.....
Old 18th March 2014 | Show parent
  #37
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Circuit3's Avatar
 
🎧 5 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by eldon2975 ➡️
I have a friend who tried studying piano, and gave it up as he found it too difficult. I tried to teach him, but he was a lousy student.

The first lesson, was "Chopsticks". A perfectly suitable piece of music for a novice IMO.

So, I hand him the chopsticks, one chopstick held in his right hand playing on the 'g' note, the other chopstick held in the left hand playing on the 'f' note. I properly told him to stand up straight, and "angle the arms down". He could barely make it to the d + b part without botching it.

Needless to say, he was a HORRIBLE student.

HORRIBLE !
Did you not think of letting the student start with a fork maybe?
Old 18th March 2014 | Show parent
  #38
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gremlin moon's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
This is only a 4:28 minute video. Just progressively learn 2 seconds everyday and by the end of the year you will be at a concert level. It is all about baby steps.
Old 18th March 2014 | Show parent
  #39
Deleted 38a4a95
Guest
why do people waste decades of their lives to impersonate a robot
relatives of mine sponsor studies of such musicians (worldclass they say)
and when ever I hear about that I have to refrain from asking if they keep dolphins, too

sure I would love to be able to play like that, or play at all, but still
it's sad cause such people mostly play for saturated people who dont give a damn about music,
and they are trained in a way that makes it impossible for them to compose the simplest tune
Now I sound like Grumph
Old 18th March 2014 | Show parent
  #40
Deleted 38a4a95
Guest
Quote:
Originally Posted by eldon2975 ➡️
I have a friend who tried studying piano, and gave it up as he found it too difficult. I tried to teach him, but he was a lousy student.

The first lesson, was "Chopsticks". A perfectly suitable piece of music for a novice IMO.

So, I hand him the chopsticks, one chopstick held in his right hand playing on the 'g' note, the other chopstick held in the left hand playing on the 'f' note. I properly told him to stand up straight, and "angle the arms down". He could barely make it to the d + b part without botching it.

Needless to say, he was a HORRIBLE student.

HORRIBLE !
everyone knows that you should start with black keys first, especially beginners
Old 18th March 2014 | Show parent
  #41
BM0
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BM0's Avatar
 
1 Review written
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by memristor ➡️
why do people waste decades of their lives to impersonate a robot
relatives of mine sponsor studies of such musicians (worldclass they say)
and when ever I hear about that I have to refrain from asking if they keep dolphins, too

sure I would love to be able to play like that, or play at all, but still
it's sad cause such people mostly play for saturated people who dont give a damn about music,
and they are trained in a way that makes it impossible for them to compose the simplest tune
Now I sound like Grumph
Some people just enjoy playing an instrument and enjoy music, whether someone else composition or their own. I look at this way, a career as a concert pianist would beat working in an office in my opinion. I sort of envy orchestra players in that they have a career for life and it is playing music. You have to be pretty good though to play in a symphony. As for being trained to play piano but not knowing composition, that is just nonsense. People are capable of learning both if they want to. An example that comes to mind... just about every great composer in history. I don't think Beethoven's piano training stumped his composition skills. It has nothing to do with training. It has to do with the individual. If a person is content with playing other people's compositions, fine, I can respect that. If they want to compose their own music, that is great.
Old 18th March 2014 | Show parent
  #42
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maisonvague's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by Deleted 38a4a95 ➡️
Now I sound like Grumph
lol. Yes. You do.

Still, I can understand why someone wouldn't want to spend so much time mastering an instrument. I think something similar whenever I watch pro sports. I think my god, how could they spend so much time practicing kicking/hitting/dribbling/chasing/throwing that ball day in day out and still maintain interest?

But actually, I can understand. I started playing piano at age four and literally begged my parents to let me take lessons. They never had to force me to practice. In fact, just the opposite: they had to force me to stop practicing!

It's people like me that then go on to become professional pianists. It's hard work, but behind it is intense motivation that leads to many personal rewards. Others may not entirely understand -- but it doesn't mean they are incorrect: it IS crazy!

But I wouldn't have it any other way.

And I agree with marino: get a teacher! It's the best way to learn how to teach oneself later down the road!
Old 18th March 2014 | Show parent
  #43
Gear Addict
 
🎧 10 years
fastest way? practice more!

Instead of practicing 30min everyday, practice 8 hours a day. You'll learn piano pretty fast.
Old 18th March 2014 | Show parent
  #44
Deleted 38a4a95
Guest
I can understand when someone plays or practices piano all day

the point I was going to make is that in classical music many heighly trained musicians are barely able to improvise
they are all technique and learned by heart repertoire, like machines, and then this repertoire
is often played for an audience that doesn't care too much about music, and that seems sad

I knew a few orchestral musicians, and while they were another (older) generation then I am,
all of them had a weird background regarding their training as a child, it might be different today
and, none of them was good at improvising, at best they could "fire" something like standard figures
so that's just my observation

anyway I am positive that the artistic aspect of performance will rather become more important than less,
and personally, I certainly would love to have much, much, much more skills than I have
and I am certainly not against trainig and learning ect, but somewhat opposed to ususal ways of training cause they never worked for me in any field
Old 18th March 2014
  #45
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Teknobeam's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
What's the fastest way to become a chef....pretty much the same question.. Or a race car driver...or a doctor....lawyer....Indian Chief.......There are no shortcuts.. no easy fast track....Why? because the process is the important thing.. the end result is only realized through arduous involvement.

The quest for a shortcut is incongruous.
Old 18th March 2014 | Show parent
  #46
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maisonvague's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by memristor ➡️
the point I was going to make is that in classical music many heighly trained musicians are barely able to improvise
they are all technique and learned by heart repertoire, like machines, and then this repertoire
is often played for an audience that doesn't care too much about music, and that seems sad
Yes, it's sad. And true.

Resurrecting the art of "classical improvisation" has been one of my life's goals. It used to be that improvisation was a part of ones training. During the Baroque era, it was common to improvise voice leadings and ornamentation over a figured bass (the Baroque equivalent of "Jazz Charts"). And later, concert pianists used to improvise their own cadenzas during a concerto or spontaneously improvise during a salon concert.

But sometime during the 19th century, scores and cadenzas became codified... and the art of improvisation was lost... except in the church (organists still learn to improvise ) and in the ballet studio, which is where I help keep it alive. I improvise pieces in "classical style" on a daily basis.

To some degree, improvisation has returned to classical music through contemporary works.

But you're quite right. It's a big failure in the education of most classical musicians.
Old 18th March 2014 | Show parent
  #47
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gremlin moon's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
OT: Amazon recently released a pilot for a series about the classical music world called Mozart in the Jungle -- I would be willing to watch a season after I saw it.
Amazon.com: Mozart in the Jungle [HD]: Season 1, Episode 1 "Pilot [HD]": Amazon Instant Video
Old 18th March 2014 | Show parent
  #48
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blizt's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by SDC ➡️
Congratulations for one of the most stupid answers i saw on gearslutz....
Logged in to upvote.
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