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How To Program Early 90s Drum Patterns?
Old 8th September 2012
  #1
Gear Maniac
 
🎧 5 years
How To Program Early 90s Drum Patterns?

I want to recreate early 90s dance music percussion as authentically as possible so if they used pre-made loops on sample cd's then mention any sample cd's from around 1994 that have loops on them. Not single one hit samples, unless that's how they programmed their percussion. But I kind of suspect that the patterns were already pre-made on sample cd's. So if that's how a lot of productions were made back then, then I'd love to track down some of the same loop percussion sample cd's that were used. But only legit ones with royalty free samples, not the datafile sample cd's and others like that....and just to emphasize once again that I'm only trying to find percussion loop sample cd's from back then that were made with drum machines etc...I'm not looking for any other kinds of sample cd's.

And if there are any techniques that using percussion loops require like time stretching or some sort of sync or something then please share that information as well it would be really helpful. I have no idea, I've never used percussion loops before. I've only tried to program patterns in with individual midi notes triggering individual samples and my patterns and the way they sound is nowhere near what I'm trying to do at all.


If it's programmed in without loops then I need all the relevant information...

Types of Note lengths for each instrument, kick, snare, hi hat etc.

Types of Note velocities for each instrument, kick, snare, hi hat etc.

Panning?

Some fundamentals on the types of patterns that were used back then.

Some fundamentals on what types of effects to use and how to use them properly on hi hats, tambourines etc to make them all kind of washed together like in the sound clips at the end of this post. It just sounds so alive and sparkly and active. Like in the Noizefactory - Reach Out example where one percussion part is playing and then another at 0:06 is overlapped to make the pattern really active. Same with Captain Hollywood Project - More & More there's like 1 percussion pattern playing..and then more comes in at 0:08..and then a ton more at 0:16... Same sort of thing with Loft - Mad where 1 simple pattern is playing and then the more active shaker part at 0:14 comes in and even more added at 0:28 with some sort of effects on it. How do I make patterns like that? Is it just pre-made loops?

Music back then had so much tempo and percussion playing at the same time.

I use Ableton Live 8 so names of the actual sounds themselves will help a lot too.... like 909 kick etc.



Also in Netzwerk - Memories what is the sound effect at 0:50? It sounds like an Oil Drum being thrown down stairs or something. It was used by so many projects back then and I'd like to know if it comes on a synth from back then like the Roland JV series or Korg M1 or something? Or is it a sample cd?

Thank you for any help, it's really appreciated!!!!
Attached Files

Noize Factory - Reach Out.mp3 (804.1 KB, 2789 views)

Captain Hollywood Project - More And More.mp3 (1.19 MB, 2590 views)

Loft - Mad.mp3 (2.13 MB, 2457 views)

Netzwerk - Memories.mp3 (2.55 MB, 2379 views)

Old 8th September 2012
  #2
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🎧 10 years
If you can't figure out how to make these beats on your own, you really have no business producing music.
Old 9th September 2012
  #3
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lain2097's Avatar
 
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most of those are 909 samples (i own a real 909 and it does not sound anything like that) most likely played back on a akai sampler. arrangement is key obviously however if you ever used a step-sequencer drum machines like a 909 you'd understand straight away why it sounds like that.
Old 9th September 2012
  #4
Gear Maniac
 
🎧 5 years
i thought this thread was gonna be about remarc and amen choppage
rats!
Old 9th September 2012
  #5
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Get yourself a grid style drum machine (909/808/606) hardware or software. i'd recommend a groovebox like the rm1x or rolands MC's or korgs electribes.
Old 9th September 2012
  #6
Wildfunk
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Darkstar2010 ➑️
But I kind of suspect that the patterns were already pre-made on sample cd's.
No, because they're way to simple to put them on a sample cd.
Old 9th September 2012 | Show parent
  #7
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Synth Buddha's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brassica ➑️
p.s. Do you think people in the 90s made beats by asking on internet forums the exact drum file names to use, the exact velocity and note length.... ?
Actually, yes, more than a few of them did. They used a fully expanded Kurzweil K2000 to time travel two decades into the future and then they actually landed on this very thread a few hours from now, a few pages down, where ultra-forumist Yoozer will explain to the beginner in a lengthy post how to make a typical 909 4x4 beat, and that you don't need analog synths if you're going to record them digitally anyway, seeing as the differences between analog synths recorded digitally and digital emulations of analog synths are there only in practice and not in theory, and theory - as we all know - is all that actually matters in music, as stuff like sound and emotion and practice can be subjective and is therefore of course irrelevant.

Our time traveling friends will then return to the glorious days of Atari sequencing and DAT machines with their newfound wisdom of the future, and only a few years later some idiots in Sweden will start making TB-303 and TR-909 software emulations that you can run on your computer, after a fellow bunch of Swedes have already made a red synth that isn't analog but is known to sound the same as an analog synth because it should do so in theory.

When musicians tell the software programmers that their software programs don't sound the same as the real TR-909 and TB-303, the software programmers will inform the musicians that they're wrong and that they MUST be wrong, seeing as these programs sound the same in theory and that you can make the same sequences on them that you can on the hardware units, so therefore they actually sound the same as the real TR-909 and TB-303. The software programmers will repeat these statements many, many, many times and get other to repeat them too, many, many times over the coming years. After some time has passed, people will start repeating it to themselves. They will repeat mantras like: "Even though I don't think my software instruments sound the same as that other guy's hardware instruments, they really do, because they do so in theory. One more time: Even though I don't think my software instruments sound the same as that other guys hardware instruments, they really do, because they do so in theory. So even though in practice it clearly isn't so, it must still be so because it is so in theory."

And here we are today, with hordes of musicians now making music with software instruments only, all the while scratching their heads as to why the music they make sounds about as interesting and exciting as a lifelong career in accounting, when broke ass knuckleheads in cheap flats in Essex and Birmingham and Cardiff and Amsterdam could make simple stuff with a couple of drum machines and a sampler that sounded fantastic and even two decades later is still the stuff that really makes people go ballistic on dance floors all over the world.
Old 9th September 2012
  #8
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chrisso's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
Early 90's it would be 808/909, EMU and Oberheim drum machines, Akai samplers, plus Fairlight for the higher end projects.
You can't write any rules about note lengths or velocities because every platform is different, every programmer is different and every producer, plus it depends on the sounds you are using, the type of song, the tempo, the fx, like compression and reverb, both of which were employed heavily in the 90's.
The best you can do is assemble the sounds, from original machines to sample packs, and programme the rest by ear as best you can.
Old 9th September 2012 | Show parent
  #9
Gear Maniac
 
🎧 5 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by lain2097 ➑️
most of those are 909 samples (i own a real 909 and it does not sound anything like that) most likely played back on a akai sampler. arrangement is key obviously however if you ever used a step-sequencer drum machines like a 909 you'd understand straight away why it sounds like that.
Arrangement was exactly what I was asking for in my original post yes. I know that they're 909/808 samples etc. And drum machines of that era. So how do I make those patterns without actually having a drum machine. I have Ableton Live 8 like I mentioned. But it's the same for any DAW really...I'm asking how to create those patterns using midi notes to trigger the samples.
Old 9th September 2012 | Show parent
  #10
Gear Maniac
 
🎧 5 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by chrisso ➑️
You can't write any rules about note lengths or velocities because every platform is different, every programmer is different and every producer, plus it depends on the sounds you are using, the type of song, the tempo, the fx, like compression and reverb, both of which were employed heavily in the 90's.
I posted very specific audio examples so it wasnt like I was asking some nebulous question that could be left to interpretation. I posted the types of sounds (drum patterns & the drum sounds) I'm interested in. The type of song? I posted the exact type of song in the examples. And I wasnt asking for any rules about note lengths or velocities either. Just some ideas like I asked in my original post. I said fundamentals, meaning I wasnt asking for rules at all...But simply some good fundamental starting points. If you listen to the audio examples I'm sure it must be possible to interpret the velocities/note lengths etc.
Old 9th September 2012
  #11
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Rogue Ai's Avatar
 
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Piano roll existed in the 90's so it wouldn't be any different. I use Cubase which is still very similar to its 90's version.

Set your quantization to 16ths. Place your kick on 1, 5, 9, and 13. Snares/claps on 5 and 13. Open hats on 3, 7, 11, 15 etc. You just need to get in there an experiment. That it how I learned. Though, it's much easier to visualize when you have a drum machine.
Old 9th September 2012
  #12
Deleted 94711a4
Guest
As some others have mentioned, there's nothing hard about making those types of drums at all. It's pretty standard four on the floor for the kick and 16ths for the hats.

Just load up a few samples in a sampler, press record on your sequencer, bang away on your keyboard and you should have those types of drum patterns in a minute or two.
Old 9th September 2012 | Show parent
  #13
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🎧 15 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by Darkstar2010 ➑️
If you listen to the audio examples I'm sure it must be possible to interpret the velocities/note lengths etc.
Really?
If it's so simple then you could do it yourself.
Old 9th September 2012 | Show parent
  #14
Gear Maniac
 
🎧 5 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rogue Ai ➑️
Piano roll existed in the 90's so it wouldn't be any different. I use Cubase which is still very similar to it's 90's version.

Set your quantization to 16ths. Place your kick on 1, 5, 9, and 13. Snares/claps on 5 and 13. Open hats on 3, 7, 11, 15 etc. You just need to get in there an experiment. That it how I learned. Though, it's much easier to visualize when you have a drum machine.
Thank you, I really appreciate that you read my post and answered what I was asking about. Instead of getting trolled by that first poster in this thread that is telling me to quit for being a beginner asking beginner questions. That's really discouraging actually that people aren't allowed to ask questions when you're a beginner.

When you say set the quantization to 16ths does that mean that every note will be 16th notes? The kick will also be a 16th note?
Old 9th September 2012 | Show parent
  #15
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Rogue Ai's Avatar
 
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🎧 5 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by Darkstar2010 ➑️
When you say set the quantization to 16ths does that mean that every note will be 16th notes? The kick will also be a 16th note?
It's setting the resolution of the piano roll so that it would be the same as a 16th step pattern on a drum machine.

How To Program Early 90s Drum Patterns?-4-4-beat.png

Note that in the image I was using swing so the piano roll grid isn't straight 1/16ths.
Attached Images
File Type: png 4-4 beat.PNG (27.6 KB, 9524 views)
Old 9th September 2012 | Show parent
  #16
Gear Maniac
 
🎧 5 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by chrisso ➑️
Really?
If it's so simple then you could do it yourself.
Because I'm a beginner and I don't have an ear for that sort of thing. But I'll give you the benefit of the doubt and go with no one in the entire world can pick out velocities or note lengths when they hear an electronic drum beat. So what about the rest of the things I said? They made perfect sense. I'm not sure why you asked about what type of song or sounds when I posted specific examples and my post was as thorough as possible. That's all I was saying to you...not even trying to be argumentative either. I really appreciate peoples help, but when the first post in your thread is a person telling you to quit for being new to music production...and then a bunch of other replies that haven't answered even 1 question that you asked...it's a little confusing. And all I want is some clarity. I never once said it was simple. It obviously isn't for me. Chocolate chip cookies are as simple as it gets...but if you didn't know the recipe...good luck on ever figuring it out yourself. It doesn't matter how simple this stuff might seem to everyone else, it's only simple because you already have the knowledge. Asking others for information is what this website is for and I shouldn't be discriminated for asking any question at all no matter how simple.
Old 9th September 2012 | Show parent
  #17
Gear Maniac
 
🎧 5 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rogue Ai ➑️
It's setting the resolution of the piano roll so that it would be the same as a 16th step pattern on a drum machine.

How To Program Early 90s Drum Patterns?-4-4-beat.png

Note that in the image I was using swing so the piano roll grid isn't straight 1/16ths.
That's actually a lot more helpful than you know because I had no idea that it should be 16th notes. I have to resort to watching trance tutorials on youtube since there aren't any 90s tutorials really..and they use 1/4 notes and 1/2 notes for their kicks if I remember correctly. So basically I can sort of learn from those tutorials, but at the same time they send me in the wrong direction.

thanks for helpin me out =]
Old 9th September 2012
  #18
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Grummy77's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by Darkstar2010 ➑️

When you say set the quantization to 16ths does that mean that every note will be 16th notes? The kick will also be a 16th note?
Yes that's what it means. You have Ableton Live you really owe it to yourself to read the manual as they have a great easy to follow one for it. It's been a while dice I opened it but I think you can access it from the help menu up top. If that doesn't help they have implemented some pretty good tutorials right in the program.

You'll learn how to get going a lot faster than waiting for random Gear Slutz to come across this thread and answer all the very basics that you obviously need to get a grasp of.

Ableton is a very powerful flexible program and a pretty easy learning curb especially considering everything it does. If you take a few hours a day over the next week and go through the manual and some tutorials you'll surely appreciate it. There are also loads of videos on line that will walk you through all of the basics and then some. But yes quantizing to 16th notes basically locks all of your midi notes to 16th notes on a grid. That is what quantizing does. It adjusts notes to the nearest chosen beat. In this case that is 16th notes.
Old 9th September 2012 | Show parent
  #19
Gear Maniac
 
🎧 5 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by Grummy77 ➑️
Yes that's what it means. You have Ableton Live you really owe it to yourself to read the manual as they have a great easy to follow one for it. It's been a while dice I opened it but I think you can access it from the help menu up top. If that doesn't help they have implemented some pretty good tutorials right in the program.

You'll learn how to get going a lot faster than waiting for random Gear Slutz to come across this thread and answer all the very basics that you obviously need to get a grasp of.

Ableton is a very powerful flexible program and a pretty easy learning curb especially considering everything it does. If you take a few hours a day over the next week and go through the manual and some tutorials you'll surely appreciate it. There are also loads of videos on line that will walk you through all of the basics and then some. But yes quantizing to 16th notes basically locks all of your midi notes to 16th notes on a grid. That is what quantizing does. It adjusts notes to the nearest chosen beat. In this case that is 16th notes.
Thanks for the advice. I just started this summer so I'm not that far along yeah. And I'm basically just learning my way around the program more than making music at this stage. I've read some of the manual and watched a ton of tutorials specifically on Ableton Live. So I'm pretty comfortable for the most part when it comes to Live. But making music and learning the depths of your sequencer at the same time can be daunting. So I've focused almost entirely on being able to use Live for now and how everything works. So now I'm slowly trying to make music with it as I'm really at ease with how Live works and where everything is in the program.

So if I program my drum patterns as 16th notes does that mean I should program my leads etc as 16th notes as well to keep everything sequenced at the same tempo or something?
Old 9th September 2012
  #20
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Grummy77's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by Darkstar2010 ➑️
That's actually a lot more helpful than you know because I had no idea that it should be 16th notes. I have to resort to watching trance tutorials on youtube since there aren't any 90s tutorials really..and they use 1/4 notes and 1/2 notes for their kicks if I remember correctly. So basically I can sort of learn from those tutorials, but at the same time they send me in the wrong direction.

thanks for helpin me out =]
For the most part triggering beats with MIDI notes the "note lenth" is irrelevant. Except for some long kicks and cymbals that will cut off or fade out when receiving a MIDI note off message. For example most (if not all) of Live's drum sampler (can't remember the name off hand) only listen's for a "note on" message. It then triggers that sample. So if you were using an electronic drum pad played with sticks it would work. The MIDI notes from those MIDI drum pads are just a blip. Not even a 64th note.

It's possible you are saying note length and meaning note value. Like what you would read on notated music. If you have a step sequencer (or quantized grid) set to 16th notes and you are playing the kick on the first, fifth, ninth, and thirteenth points on that sixteenth note grid it would sound the same as if you were quantized to quarter notes and had the kick triggering on points 1,2,3,&4. In both instances that would be a quarter note kick. Now we're getting into basic music theory. There are four sixteenth notes within the time frame of each quarter note one of which being beat one. Theoretically for a drum beat beat one is can be viewed as a whole note, a half note, a quarter, eighth, 16th, 32nd, 64th...... Depending on the "grid" you're considering. It's prolly easiest and quickest to pick up this concept with a step sequencer in front of you. I'm surprised Live doesn't have a step sequencer in any of the built in instruments really.
Old 9th September 2012
  #21
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As long as it is a divisible of 4 you should be fine.

32nds, 16ths, 8ths, quarter, half, etc would all be of the same tempo.
Old 9th September 2012 | Show parent
  #22
Gear Maniac
 
🎧 5 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by Grummy77 ➑️
For the most part triggering beats with MIDI notes the "note lenth" is irrelevant. Except for some long kicks and cymbals that will cut off or fade out when receiving a MIDI note off message. For example most (if not all) of Live's drum sampler (can't remember the name off hand) only listen's for a "note on" message. It then triggers that sample. So if you were using an electronic drum pad played with sticks it would work. The MIDI notes from those MIDI drum pads are just a blip. Not even a 64th note.

It's possible you are saying note length and meaning note value. Like what you would read on notated music. If you have a step sequencer (or quantized grid) set to 16th notes and you are playing the kick on the first, fifth, ninth, and thirteenth points on that sixteenth note grid it would sound the same as if you were quantized to quarter notes and had the kick triggering on points 1,2,3,&4. In both instances that would be a quarter note kick. Now we're getting into basic music theory. There are four sixteenth notes within the time frame of each quarter note one of which being beat one. Theoretically for a drum beat beat one is can be viewed as a whole note, a half note, a quarter, eighth, 16th, 32nd, 64th...... Depending on the "grid" you're considering. It's prolly easiest and quickest to pick up this concept with a step sequencer in front of you. I'm surprised Live doesn't have a step sequencer in any of the built in instruments really.
The explanation in the Trance Tutorial was that it made the kick boomier the longer you stretched the midi note out...and more punchy the shorter the midi note was... something like that any way. In Ableton Live I use Drum Racks which I thought was a step sequencer the way you program midi notes in the piano roll...but it sounds like I'm being enlightened. What is the difference between Drum Racks and the piano roll and a step sequencer?

And to answer your question about whether I'm saying note length or note value I have no idea. I'm saying that in the piano roll you can drag the note and make it a longer midi note (not move the note to a new position). Here is an image from google images of different size midi notes in a piano roll that I'm talking about.

Old 9th September 2012
  #23
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The length of the note does not matter if your drum synth/sampler has only decay. Or in other words, it has no sustain phase.
Old 9th September 2012
  #24
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Grummy77's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
I made you a quick simple video. I just used an impulse instrument and one of Live's presets.



I hope this helps. It just show's real quick like a way to treat live and the impulse instrument similarly to how one would work on an ol'909 or other drum machine with a simple step sequencer. Drop in the samples you like and play around. It's a fun fast way to learn this stuff. Outside of this just get creative. Play with effects use a more complex instrument like a Drum Rack in Live.

I don't usually compose or make beats in Live although it can be great for that. I work in Pro Tools at home mostly. But I play with Live more on my Laptop and building sound designs for live theatre. I really dig Live though. I need to play more. Especially integrating Max for Live. Such a powerful combo.
Old 9th September 2012 | Show parent
  #25
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🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rogue Ai ➑️
The length of the note does not matter if your drum synth/sampler has only decay. Or in other words, it has no sustain phase.
This.

IN most if not all of Ableton's Drum Rack instruments the MIDI note length won't make a difference. Only the note on message (the front start point of your MIDI note rectangle) and the velocity matter.


Although that changes if you are using a more complex instrument one that behaves more like an analog drum machine in the sense that you can have long kick drums that will sustain as long as you hold the note or for the length of your MIDI note. Basic trigger playback doesn't normally do that. If you were to build some kick drums out of Operator or some other synth then note lengths could become more important.

But for simple triggereing like Impulse and Drum Racks it doesn't matter.

Last edited by Grummy77; 9th September 2012 at 07:05 AM.. Reason: Further explenation.
Old 9th September 2012 | Show parent
  #26
Gear Maniac
 
🎧 5 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by Grummy77 ➑️
I made you a quick simple video. I just used an impulse instrument and one of Live's presets.



I hope this helps. It just show's real quick like a way to treat live and the impulse instrument similarly to how one would work on an ol'909 or other drum machine with a simple step sequencer. Drop in the samples you like and play around. It's a fun fast way to learn this stuff. Outside of this just get creative. Play with effects use a more complex instrument like a Drum Rack in Live.

I don't usually compose or make beats in Live although it can be great for that. I work in Pro Tools at home mostly. But I play with Live more on my Laptop and building sound designs for live theatre. I really dig Live though. I need to play more. Especially integrating Max for Live. Such a powerful combo.
That was eye opening thanks for the extra effort... If anyone coulda seen what my drum patterns looked like you'd understand why I started this thread. Everyone said they abandoned Impulse when Drum Racks was invented so I was using Drum Racks. How come you use Impulse instead of drum racks?

Thanks for taking the time to guide me in the right direction. Really appreciate it!
Old 9th September 2012 | Show parent
  #27
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Grummy77's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by Darkstar2010 ➑️
Everyone said they abandoned Impulse when Drum Racks was invented so I was using Drum Racks. How come you use Impulse instead of drum racks?

Thanks for taking the time to guide me in the right direction. Really appreciate it!
Most welcome.

Drum Racks is by far superior to Impulse. I was only using Impulse for this demo. If I was seriously making a beat in Live I would have used a Drum Rack instrument instead. But what I wanted to show here Impulse could do. You could do the same thing with a Drum Rack but there would be way more than just eight note lanes and then it would start looking a lot less like a simple step sequencer. I just used it for simplification and clarity. I wanted you to see all the lanes at once is all.
Old 9th September 2012 | Show parent
  #28
Gear Maniac
 
🎧 5 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by Grummy77 ➑️
This.

IN most if not all of Ableton's Drum Rack instruments the MIDI note length won't make a difference. Only the note on message (the front start point of your MIDI note rectangle) and the velocity matter.


Although that changes if you are using a more complex instrument one that behaves more like an analog drum machine in the sense that you can have long kick drums that will sustain as long as you hold the note or for the length of your MIDI note. Basic trigger playback doesn't normally do that. If you were to build some kick drums out of Operator or some other synth then note lengths could become more important.

But for simple triggereing like Impulse and Drum Racks it doesn't matter.
I just opened Ableton Live to check the projects I've been working on over the summer and in my Drum Racks the notes sustain. No wonder I've been in drum programming hell for 2 months straight.. I couldn't get anything to sound right at all. I used my own wav samples that I dragged into the pads in Drum Racks. And triggered them with midi notes in the piano roll. The size of the midi note completely changes the sound. And a longer midi note is boomier like in the tutorial that I watched on youtube. I had no idea that it was possible to program percussion with only the midi note triggering the sample and that's it. I actually made another thread on here asking that exact thing! LoL because I knew something was wrong for sure. But I think everyone assumed that my piano roll was already operating that way and didn't really understand why I hated programming drum patterns with midi so much haha. What a nightmare Ive been dealing with lol.

So do you know why my Drum Racks isn't just triggering the note on message and that's it? That would change my entire life to know how to do that!
Old 9th September 2012
  #29
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CJ1973's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Simple...buy a software like cubase or something
Open an early 90s track and convert audio to midi...
Then replace sounds with samples of 909s in there..I would add a mirage sampler along with an Akai s series.
Use ADAT to track it. For bass use TB or Tx81z..
Old 9th September 2012 | Show parent
  #30
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Grummy77's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by Darkstar2010 ➑️
I just opened Ableton Live to check the projects I've been working on over the summer and in my Drum Racks the notes sustain. No wonder I've been in drum programming hell for 2 months straight.. I couldn't get anything to sound right at all. I used my own wav samples that I dragged into the pads in Drum Racks. And triggered them with midi notes in the piano roll. The size of the midi note completely changes the sound. And a longer midi note is boomier like in the tutorial that I watched on youtube. I had no idea that it was possible to program percussion with only the midi note triggering the sample and that's it. I actually made another thread on here asking that exact thing! LoL because I knew something was wrong for sure. But I think everyone assumed that my piano roll was already operating that way and didn't really understand why I hated programming drum patterns with midi so much haha. What a nightmare Ive been dealing with lol.

So do you know why my Drum Racks isn't just triggering the note on message and that's it? That would change my entire life to know how to do that!
Oh **** sorry yeah. If you want the full drum sample to play every time you trigger that note no matter how long or short of a MIDI note. Open up the decay of all your samples all the way.


P.S. Whoops I ment REALEASE. Open up the Release all the way.

Last edited by Grummy77; 9th September 2012 at 07:56 AM.. Reason: Used the wrong word.
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