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I feel like I'm stuck in a loophole of watching tutorials, have I been wasting my time?
Old 15th August 2021
  #1
Gear Head
 
I feel like I'm stuck in a loophole of watching tutorials, have I been wasting my time?

Hey, I realized I have been watching tutorial after tutorial for years now, and I have barely gotten anything done.

I end up watching all these youtube tutorials, synthesize this way, compress that way, mix like this, and their each 10 to 20 minutes long, I end up wasting my hole day watching them.

I realized, when I first started making music, I just opened my DAW and experimented with everything, I learned how everything worked by experimenting.

I ended up making so many more songs when I first started than I do now, and I honestly feel like all the tutorials I've been watching is why. I never end up using the stuff I learn when I open my daw anyway, I always just try a bunch of different things till I get what I like.

And when I think of my favorite producers in the early days, there was no tutorials to teach them this stuff were there? They learned it all on there on, or with friends.

I find the same thing with music theory too, once you learn the very basics of music theory, synthesizers, eqs/compressors, is there really any need to watch all these
*how to make genre mixing mastering course*
*how to mix like a pro, secert compressor plugin secerts!* videos?

I wrote lots of things down in notepads from videos like these, and articles, butI never open them... I basically have so much notepad stuff written down I could waste my time for months going through it


or I could open up my daw, throw some beats and chords down, add instrumentation and figure out how to make it sound good on the spot.


What do you guys think?
Did you use tutorials when first starting out producing? Or did you just learn the basics and experiment?

Are tutorials actually counter productive?


I have many bookmarks too, I'm considering deleting them all and just start opening my daw everyday instead.
Old 15th August 2021
  #2
Gear Guru
 
Bignatius's Avatar
Only you can choose what you do with it all. It's like arguing against schools and libraries.

Put down the web browser, turn off YouTube, and get to work actually making music.

Logoff of gearslutz right now, even.

Read your notebooks. Set goals. Be disciplined.

Same as any other endeavor worth pursuing.
Old 15th August 2021
  #3
Lives for gear
 
Tomás Mulcahy's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
Learning is always good, but if it's using up production time ask yourself:
1. Are you procrastinating by spending all of your time passively learning, and not producing?
2. Do you want to produce?
3. Do you simply enjoy the process of learning and don't want to produce?

The correct answer is the one that feels right to you.

But I guess because you're asking, you want to produce stuff. So either:
1. Try out/ practice the things you've written down. If you're never gonna use some of that stuff in an actual track that doesn't matter as long as you do B below. Don't sweat the small stuff
2. Stick with experimenting and only use tutorials when you get stuck because you have questions that need answering.

Also:
A. Don't get hung up on mixing and recording. Composing/ arranging is more important if you're self-producing. Every monkey on YT has advice on mixing and recording. In comparison, there's very little expertise on composing.

B. Aim to finish stuff. Set yourself a target. For example, finish one track per week. Finish means ya gotta release it to the public in some way. This makes space for new compositions.

SubmitHub is pretty good for feedback. Forums like here can be good but are hit and miss.

C. If procrastination is a problem, try some self help books. There are many. I got a lot from "Art & Fear". This https://makingmusic.ableton.com/ is great too.

Let joy be your guide
Old 15th August 2021
  #4
Gear Guru
 
Yoozer's Avatar
 
1 Review written
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aoharukano ➡️
Hey, I realized I have been watching tutorial after tutorial for years now, and I have barely gotten anything done.
Get a clear definition of what you consider "done". Is it a single track? An EP? An album?

If you don't know this yet, figure it out first before you do anything else.
Quote:
And when I think of my favorite producers in the early days, there was no tutorials to teach them this stuff were there? They learned it all on there on, or with friends.
You can still do this and speaking as someone who had to live through this you are in an infinitely better situation right now. There are lots of dead ends. The main advantage is in actually doing stuff and racking up your hours.

Keep the analogy of the ceramics class in mind - referenced in the book Tomás mentions. https://excellentjourney.net/2015/03...efore-quality/
Quote:
Did you use tutorials when first starting out producing? Or did you just learn the basics and experiment?

Are tutorials actually counter productive?
Set a clear goal. Set a clear deadline. Challenge yourself. If you bump into an unknown, write it down and solve it later; or try to work around it without getting stuck, but work quickly. Or don't solve it at all and wait for feedback.

Kill your darlings. Your track that you pushed out is worth nothing if you can do better. Don't fear using up your best ideas. There is no sin in using presets if it means moving faster.

Constrained art can be fun. Constrained thinking isn't. All rules are made up, but they exist for a reason - they show things that work in a specific situation.

Tutorials are not counterproductive but they are practice. At a certain point you need to do something real with the safety off and that also means failing. All those hours were wasted - but only if you didn't learn anything from them. Don't fear waste and don't try to spend to much time on finding the shortcut or the "best" solution that you end up slower with something worse. There is no best anyway.

Your setup should be conducive to this and streamlined to contain only what is necessary. Sort out your production process so you have a funnel that goes from idea to realization. Reduce; you do not need a dozen EQs or even half of that of anything. People with 20 analog subtractives just have them to not deal with multitracking or polyphony limits and for plugins no restrictions apply anyway.

As for theory - it increases your musical dietary variety and appetite if you've been only eating 4-chord songs until now. Know your scales and chords, start simple and then refine - and it should always be in service of the song, not to show how clever you are. People saying "you should play what you feel, man" do not tend to take this into account so if they just feel 4 chords they can never transcend them.

I would have loved tutorials for theory and the basics of synthesis. I am still learning to mix. You are never done. I learned lots of things by myself and this works well when you are still young and sufficiently obsessed.

However, modern tutorials tend to be 25% self promotion and show nothing really novel. This too is because of the landscape - they're just trying to make a living as well.

In the gold rush, the people who got rich sold shovels and buckets. Gear and videos just promise the riches, but don't deliver them. If you want to make money with music, build gear - or like the tutorial people, sell "how to get rich" books.
Old 15th August 2021
  #5
Gear Addict
 
NawwwwwSun's Avatar
 
If I can’t figure it out from experimentation, the manual, or a friend telling me about it, I’m never gonna learn said technique.

Quit looking at all tutorials that **** is just making all music sound the same.
Old 15th August 2021
  #6
Lives for gear
 
cane creek's Avatar
 
🎧 15 years
When I first started making music in 2000 there seemed to be more fear of getting viruses so my music PC would never be connected to the net and I seemed to get a lot of tracks made.

In 2008 I swapped to Mac and never gave viruses much thought and since always have my music Mac hooked up to the net, but being hooked up to the net is far too big of a distraction for me, i always go in my studio with big plans of making music then get caught up in YouTube videos, forum talk and Gassing over next bit of kit instead.

Don’t you ever get that type of gassing where you feel you can’t make music anymore until you have that bit of kit your eyeing up?
Old 15th August 2021
  #7
Lives for gear
 
🎧 10 years
Stop watching youtube.
Enough learned.
Start making music.
Start an album with at least 10 tracks.
Never make single tracks. Never.
Make that album with what you have.
There is no youtube.
There are no tutorials.
Its you and your instruments and plugins.
There will never be better tools than the ones you have.
Make an album.
Never a single track.
Start 10 projects. Make 10 Folders within the album folder. Start making them all. Doesnt matter. Work on No.1. A bit, Then on 2. Then 3. Until 10. Then again work on 1. Then a bit on 2. Stay with every project for at most an hour, unless you feel real genius. Then 2 hours.

Within one week you will evolve an exact imagination of what this album will be about and what it will be. And it will be a homogenic piece of art. And its your album. Your album alone. And you will have invented new methods of mixing. Pros will ask you how you did it. Dont follow others. Lead. Its your album. Your music. Your effort.

And: Never work on one track/project/song. Never.
Old 15th August 2021
  #8
Gear Maniac
 
🎧 10 years
If you're really stuck and need a boost out of that cycle (beyond the reality check from this thread) check out the first 50-100 pages or so of a book called: Music Habits - The mental game of electronic music production by Jason Ward

Here's an excerpt perhaps even enough for you:

"Tutorials can be the invisible enemy disguising itself as your friend, especially when you aren't
feeling confident in your current skill set. Instead of fighting through a track and learning from
personal experience, you convince yourself that you are being productive because you are teaching
yourself new tricks. Unfortunately, unless you put to immediate use, you'll forget 80% of what you
watched."
Old 15th August 2021 | Show parent
  #9
Lives for gear
 
jazzcabbage's Avatar
 
🎧 5 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bignatius ➡️
Only you can choose what you do with it all. It's like arguing against schools and libraries.

Put down the web browser, turn off YouTube, and get to work actually making music.

Logoff of gearslutz right now, even.

Read your notebooks. Set goals. Be disciplined.

Same as any other endeavor worth pursuing.
Quote:
Originally Posted by whiteaxxxe ➡️
Stop watching youtube.
Enough learned.
Start making music.
Start an album with at least 10 tracks.
Never make single tracks. Never.
Make that album with what you have.
There is no youtube.
There are no tutorials.
Its you and your instruments and plugins.
There will never be better tools than the ones you have.
Make an album.
Never a single track.
Start 10 projects. Make 10 Folders within the album folder. Start making them all. Doesnt matter. Work on No.1. A bit, Then on 2. Then 3. Until 10. Then again work on 1. Then a bit on 2. Stay with every project for at most an hour, unless you feel real genius. Then 2 hours.

Within one week you will evolve an exact imagination of what this album will be about and what it will be. And it will be a homogenic piece of art. And its your album. Your album alone. And you will have invented new methods of mixing. Pros will ask you how you did it. Dont follow others. Lead. Its your album. Your music. Your effort.

And: Never work on one track/project/song. Never.
Old 15th August 2021
  #10
Lives for gear
 
1 Review written
🎧 10 years
YouTube and equivalents are decades of developers and AI mechanics to manipulate your online behavior. The goals are maximizing your clicks and time spent. In addition so called influencers and wannabes have the same goal. It’s not easy to resist, the statistical power or AI and endless data streams create a system that makes it unlikely, less then 50% chance that you can withstand the desire to watch just one video more.

Sorry to sound like this but I am from this business and still I have very low clue how immensively powerful the mechanics are that Silicon Valley throws at us. Good thing is you found out that something is not ok here.

From a producer standpoint I can assure you while some of the tutorials I find useful and also 1-2 leveraged my productions 99% is just a waste of important time, an entertainment at best. Not because the tutorials are wrong but because of the fact that a video to explain a concept deeply enough is a) very limited and the content needs to be simplified and b) you still need to absorb the concept with your own active studying on the topic. If you are going to a university it’s 10% hearing and 90% active studying work or developing skills through work.

Every concept and idea you need can also read and asked here on GS. To it’s fullest. Gear needs to be explored, deeply, on your own.

I could write tutorials on my own but I know the concept will be sunk into misleading, confusing or simplified statements that do not hold what I am trying to say that’s how it is, and for everyone who write tutorials because your own experience is the best teacher by far, to a level which makes it hard to communicate the concepts. Shut it all down, accept your addiction and say no. It’s not your fault it’s how these things are designed to trick you.

The only thing that I really like on YT are yoga and fitness videos and see they need proper input of yourself doing it actively with your body to really work for you.

Cheers - an online addict
Old 15th August 2021
  #11
Gear Addict
 
Transistores's Avatar
 
🎧 5 years
Music tutorials on YouTube are often just excuses to make you listen to awful or mediocre music and flaunt expensive piece of hardware.
Old 15th August 2021
  #12
Lives for gear
 
jags's Avatar
 
🎧 5 years
This thread reads like a tutorial on tutorials!!
Old 16th August 2021 | Show parent
  #13
Gear Head
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tomás Mulcahy ➡️
Learning is always good, but if it's using up production time ask yourself:
1. Are you procrastinating by spending all of your time passively learning, and not producing?
2. Do you want to produce?
3. Do you simply enjoy the process of learning and don't want to produce?

The correct answer is the one that feels right to you.

But I guess because you're asking, you want to produce stuff. So either:
1. Try out/ practice the things you've written down. If you're never gonna use some of that stuff in an actual track that doesn't matter as long as you do B below. Don't sweat the small stuff
2. Stick with experimenting and only use tutorials when you get stuck because you have questions that need answering.

Also:
A. Don't get hung up on mixing and recording. Composing/ arranging is more important if you're self-producing. Every monkey on YT has advice on mixing and recording. In comparison, there's very little expertise on composing.

B. Aim to finish stuff. Set yourself a target. For example, finish one track per week. Finish means ya gotta release it to the public in some way. This makes space for new compositions.

SubmitHub is pretty good for feedback. Forums like here can be good but are hit and miss.

C. If procrastination is a problem, try some self help books. There are many. I got a lot from "Art & Fear". This https://makingmusic.ableton.com/ is great too.

Let joy be your guide
I started making music, but I felt my music was "inferior" and got some pretty harsh critiques on my stuff from friends for a while. So I decided I would try to learn and get alot better.

I ended up becoming a procrastinator like you said, and watch too many tutorials while barely doing anything now.

Your post is good advice, i'll checkout submithub and try that song a week thing, I need to break out of this habbit I formed lol.
Old 16th August 2021 | Show parent
  #14
Gear Head
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by cane creek ➡️
When I first started making music in 2000 there seemed to be more fear of getting viruses so my music PC would never be connected to the net and I seemed to get a lot of tracks made.

In 2008 I swapped to Mac and never gave viruses much thought and since always have my music Mac hooked up to the net, but being hooked up to the net is far too big of a distraction for me, i always go in my studio with big plans of making music then get caught up in YouTube videos, forum talk and Gassing over next bit of kit instead.

Don’t you ever get that type of gassing where you feel you can’t make music anymore until you have that bit of kit your eyeing up?
Hi yes, I also have done this. and have that feeling alot, I felt like I JUST NEED TO GET THIS SYNTH FIRST then would research it and watch examples
reading about new synths, and everything. I'm constantly distracted by the internet/chats

Good advice disconnecting but it's so hard to do...
Old 16th August 2021 | Show parent
  #15
Gear Head
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mangobob ➡️
If you're really stuck and need a boost out of that cycle (beyond the reality check from this thread) check out the first 50-100 pages or so of a book called: Music Habits - The mental game of electronic music production by Jason Ward

Here's an excerpt perhaps even enough for you:

"Tutorials can be the invisible enemy disguising itself as your friend, especially when you aren't
feeling confident in your current skill set. Instead of fighting through a track and learning from
personal experience, you convince yourself that you are being productive because you are teaching
yourself new tricks. Unfortunately, unless you put to immediate use, you'll forget 80% of what you
watched."
WOW, ouch. This literally just sealed the deal for me. I've definitely wasted alot of time. I'm going to get this book though, maybe it will be the last thing I read for a while lol

edit// I just started reading the book, it's amazing. I'm on page 8, it's literally everything I've gone through. This book is amazing, it's like he wrote my own story (the joining chats, meeting know it alls, endless searching plugins etc. I gotto say thank you for recommending this book lol
Old 16th August 2021
  #16
Kja
Lives for gear
I don't get why lots of people here act like it is some kind of goal post.. I feel like if i make something cool.. If not cool.. I used to worry a lot that i wasn't being productive and making songs like i know i can.. But eventually realized that even when i make a album, it is just another album in a sea of albums and nobody really cares.. Sad i know but it is not like if you finally make some songs the sea will part for you.. If you are not enjoying the process you are doing it wrong and missing the point.
Old 16th August 2021 | Show parent
  #17
Gear Guru
 
Bignatius's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aoharukano ➡️
WOW, ouch. This literally just sealed the deal for me. I've definitely wasted alot of time. I'm going to get this book though, maybe it will be the last thing I read for a while lol

edit// I just started reading the book, it's amazing. I'm on page 8, it's literally everything I've gone through. This book is amazing, it's like he wrote my own story (the joining chats, meeting know it alls, endless searching plugins etc. I gotto say thank you for recommending this book lol
Be careful, books can be like tutorials.

And reading that book is still *not* making music...

What other new data do you need that hasn't already been said here? What on Earth is that book telling you that you truly need to know before getting down to business?

Probably nothing.

Old 16th August 2021 | Show parent
  #18
Lives for gear
 
jbuehler's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kja ➡️
I don't get why lots of people here act like it is some kind of goal post.. I feel like if i make something cool.. If not cool.. I used to worry a lot that i wasn't being productive and making songs like i know i can.. But eventually realized that even when i make a album, it is just another album in a sea of albums and nobody really cares.. Sad i know but it is not like if you finally make some songs the sea will part for you.. If you are not enjoying the process you are doing it wrong and missing the point.
Great post! It really is about the journey. I have been doing electronic music for 20 years and it’s still fun every time.
Old 16th August 2021
  #19
Lives for gear
 
Synthpark's Avatar
 
2 Reviews written
🎧 5 years
You need to watch tutorial how to finally finish a track.
Old 16th August 2021 | Show parent
  #20
Gear Head
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bignatius ➡️
Be careful, books can be like tutorials.

And reading that book is still *not* making music...

What other new data do you need that hasn't already been said here? What on Earth is that book telling you that you truly need to know before getting down to business?

Probably nothing.

The book actually explained all about dopamine addiction to youtube and forums and social media, and is trying to teach you to "break out of" creative blocks, procrastination, and that nothing is holding you back but yourself etc.

I agree books can be like tutorial, but this seems like a really good one time read to realize what I've been doing to myself TBH. It even told me to stop reading the book and open up the daw right now lol

But I agree, I was even thinking "dang I should read more books" but that's just me procrastinating again.
Old 16th August 2021
  #21
Lives for gear
 
🎧 15 years
The harsh reality is that there are musicians, and there are people that like to tinker with gear. Figure out what you are, there is no right or wrong.
Old 16th August 2021
  #22
Lives for gear
 
Barfunkel's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Do you watch them for fun, like some people watch telly all day? Or do you watch them and try to memorize stuff and really think what they're doing and how can you use those tricks in your music? It should be the latter, not the former.

I think a good idea is to limit yourself to just 1 or 2 tutorials a day, then after each tutorial you actually TRY what you just learned. It's sick difficult to watch 3 hours of tutorials straight about how to make tech house hihats, then try to apply all those things at once. You'll probably forget like 80% of it and misuse the remaining 20%. So watch one tutorial, really carefully, try to actively listen and think of what is happening. Then after that one tutorial, you open your DAW of choice and try to replicate the tutorial. Not just blindly, but by using your ears, trying to understand WHY they did the things they did in the tutorial and how can you apply those techniques in your music. You always can't, but it's the same with any education, there's always some filler stuff you won't care about.

Tutorials are a bit of a curse of course, as it's possible some individuality is lost BUT they are also a blessing. There's an insane amount of knowledge and tricks that is REALLY difficult to learn by ear, just by listening to reference records. Most of those tricks are fairly subtle too, you can basically turn off just one trick in your whole track and you can't hear any difference, but those things tend to add up. Professional production isn't about knowing a single "magic trick" that will turn a weak amateur track into a hit with 100 million views. It's about knowing hundreds of little tricks, that form a whole. Tutorials are one way to learn some them, if your best friend doesn't happen to be a pro who wants to help you out for free.

I'm not a pro or even an accomplished amateur, but just as an example, a few days ago I helped some stranger on a Facebook group. He had some reference tracks and he was wondering why his track doesn't sound the same. I liked the song, so I opted to try to figure out what can be done. Turns out, he wanted this modern Anjunadeep type of house sound, which has lots of processing and layering and all kind of subtle tricks in the drums alone. The drums of his own track were basically raw, unprocessed 808-type of sounds. Sounded like it was a demo version of an 80's track, more or less. An 80's track done with a laptop, not with period gear. So I spent like only an hour to get them sounding a tad closer to the reference tracks, using all kinds of tricks I've learned from tutorials. I could've made them a lot better than I did, had I spend an entire day, but he was a stranger and I wasn't paid so.... Then I wrote a short explanation of the things I did, so he can apply some of those tricks if he wants. The short explanation was a text file that took me 1,5 hours to write and I left some of the more meaningless details out. There was no magic trick, just a few hundred tiny things. The point being, he was just "using his ears" but since he wasn't aware of all the things that are done to those modern kinda house tracks, his track didn't sound anything like the way he actually wanted. One could argue (on GS especially) that I made the drums worse, but he didn't want to sound like an 80's house record, he wanted Anjunadeep.

The thing is, he could've done it by himself had he watched like 5 hours worth of tutorials. There wasn't any magic tricks, just simple EQ, compression, reverb, a bit of layering etc. ie. very basic production techniques.


And also, people always say to just trust your ears. The problem with that is that most amateurs haven't trained their ears to hear things properly. The fact that most amateurs use either headphones or cheap speakers in an untreated room makes the issue even worse. Some things aren't even really audible to human ears, like the frequencies between 0 and 20Hz, which eat up headroom and make compressors and limiters choke, muddying up the mix. How things are EQ'd or compressed is really difficult to hear on reference tracks as well, they just sound very good, but it's hard to pinpoint why exactly.
Old 16th August 2021
  #23
Lives for gear
 
🎧 10 years
You will become good at what you do, watching tutorials will only make you good watching tutorials.
Old 16th August 2021 | Show parent
  #24
Lives for gear
 
Barfunkel's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ludar ➡️
You will become good at what you do, watching tutorials will only make you good watching tutorials.
With the same logic, schools are a waste of time as well, if you want to become a doctor or a lawyer or an engineer, just skip elementary school, high school and college and learn it all by yourself! No need to watch teachers, you only become good at watching teachers, right?

Many things are really difficult and slow to learn by yourself. The technical details of production especially, as you don't really hear EQ, compression etc settings, only the end result. Good tutorials teach that stuff.
Old 16th August 2021 | Show parent
  #25
Lives for gear
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by Barfunkel ➡️
With the same logic, schools are a waste of time as well, if you want to become a doctor or a lawyer or an engineer, just skip elementary school, high school and college and learn it all by yourself! No need to watch teachers, you only become good at watching teachers, right?

Many things are really difficult and slow to learn by yourself. The technical details of production especially, as you don't really hear EQ, compression etc settings, only the end result. Good tutorials teach that stuff.
Well.. There is awfully lot sheeps around who are good talking but cant do much, I learnt that in university
Old 16th August 2021
  #26
Gear Nut
I’ve learnt a lot of good tips and tricks from YouTube. I’ve also wasted a lot of time watching people going through the motions and learning nothing new. You have to wade through the dross to get the odd nugget of gold. I think it’s one of those stages people have to go through to get where they want to end up. Like buying plugins you’ll never use more than once and most do the same thing.

But once you’ve gone through those stages, move on and start creating. The biggest lightbulb moment I had was realising that my first attempts to finish tracks weren’t going to be brilliant but I needed to finish them in order for the next one to be slightly better.
Old 16th August 2021
  #27
Gear Maniac
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aoharukano ➡️
Hey, I realized I have been watching tutorial after tutorial for years now, and I have barely gotten anything done.

I end up watching all these youtube tutorials, synthesize this way, compress that way, mix like this, and their each 10 to 20 minutes long, I end up wasting my hole day watching them.

I realized, when I first started making music, I just opened my DAW and experimented with everything, I learned how everything worked by experimenting.

I ended up making so many more songs when I first started than I do now, and I honestly feel like all the tutorials I've been watching is why. I never end up using the stuff I learn when I open my daw anyway, I always just try a bunch of different things till I get what I like.

And when I think of my favorite producers in the early days, there was no tutorials to teach them this stuff were there? They learned it all on there on, or with friends.

I find the same thing with music theory too, once you learn the very basics of music theory, synthesizers, eqs/compressors, is there really any need to watch all these
*how to make genre mixing mastering course*
*how to mix like a pro, secert compressor plugin secerts!* videos?

I wrote lots of things down in notepads from videos like these, and articles, butI never open them... I basically have so much notepad stuff written down I could waste my time for months going through it


or I could open up my daw, throw some beats and chords down, add instrumentation and figure out how to make it sound good on the spot.


What do you guys think?
Did you use tutorials when first starting out producing? Or did you just learn the basics and experiment?

Are tutorials actually counter productive?


I have many bookmarks too, I'm considering deleting them all and just start opening my daw everyday instead.
Is music about listening and feeling and is creating music about experimenting, doing, listening and feeling or is it all about passively watching?

You need to develop your own techniques, there is no 'right way'. This is why there's so much excellently produced absolute crap about - everyone knows how to engineer these days but know one knows how to create.
Old 16th August 2021 | Show parent
  #28
Gear Maniac
Quote:
Originally Posted by Barfunkel ➡️
With the same logic, schools are a waste of time as well, if you want to become a doctor or a lawyer or an engineer, just skip elementary school, high school and college and learn it all by yourself! No need to watch teachers, you only become good at watching teachers, right?

Many things are really difficult and slow to learn by yourself. The technical details of production especially, as you don't really hear EQ, compression etc settings, only the end result. Good tutorials teach that stuff.
Nope.

Art is not science or engineering.

If you need to be taught how to create it's not going to happen for you. Yes, really. I've worked in music education and it's about bums on seats, sticking to the curriculum, which has usually been created by someone who has not worked in the music industry and is based on an idea of what would be good to cover (I had a whole term teaching just the MIDI spec in one unit to first years FFS!, well that's going to teach them how to CREATE music when they don't know C# from Bb isn't it!), getting the right grades achieved (and no that isn't about all top grades, it's about getting everyone to stay on the course (rule number one, bums on seats) and a good average grade, not delivering quality education.

You can learn some basic techniques and then you MUST go your own way. If later you then need to refine certain things then you will know what you need to find out and you'll find that specific information.

There is a huge difference between thinking you know and actually knowing.

Using one of your examples above: hearing EQ. A tutorial does not teach you how to hear EQ. It teaches you the principle of how to apply EQ in one or two specific instances. Which admittedly is far more information than was available in the past when, no-one was going to tell you how to EQ and even if they did, there was no way of hearing it being applied (unless in person).

But still, none of this teaches you how to HEAR how to EQ. Only you can teach you how to hear EQ and it does take years and years. Even when you think you know what you are doing and think you have it down pat, just give it a year or two then go back and listen again to something you EQd, or go back to the project files and have a play around with them. What will you find? 'Well I'll be blowed, there's an annoying frequency there ringing in that hi-hat at 11.35k how on earth did I miss that' and there's frequencies honking out in the bass at 1.35k, 823hz and an annoying ring in the kick transient at 2.1k and that kick needs scooping out in the low mids'.

I'll tell you how you missed that, your brain simply could not perceive it back when you did it and you've spent another few years doing it again and again and again; the perception and precision can only develop through application and refinement.

Most doctors (GPs) are pretty poor tbh, they are there to turn around patients as fast as possible, sell prescriptions, make a profit for the practice and hopefully not kill anyone. Engineers for that matter - I should know, I am one and I work with hundreds of the bleeders, very few who are actually what would be deemed proficient, I'm certainly not. We're all good at our jobs but that's something else entirely. If I was involved in anything with the power switched on I'd be bloody dangerous! Leave that to the technicians.

Most of what is taught at university is completely useless other than giving a background feel for the subject, knowledge of some fundamentals and lots and lots and lots of maths (because that cheap and easy to teach). Actually on the job only maybe 5% of what you are taught is required, the rest is mainly completely forgotten 'use it or lose it' I can't even understand or do basic 'A' level maths anymore. Does it stop me doing my job? Nope. Have I learned far more doing my job for 20 years than anyone could ever teach me, yes. Could I have gotten the job without the education? No, it was a foot in the door. But as governments make more and more people get 'higher educated' we're now in the realms of a degree being nothing special aren't we - you require one to be a toilet cleaner these days.....or at least an NVQ4 (degree 'equivalent' lol) in bathroom hygiene and health & safety. And then put on a ladder of professional continuous development - certificates in floor mopping, toilet brush cleaning (ah but do you know the modern legislation that states that toilet brushes are no longer sanitary and are not to be used in the workplace??), soap dispense refilling....the list goes on, we have the most highly qualified toilet cleaners in the world, something to be proud of.

I'm not saying education is useless what I'm saying is small, targeted, specific amounts of education are required and bucket loads of practical application. And I suspect the OP is doing far too much of the former and none of the latter.

And to pre-empt a clever dick coming out with 'unless you cite something peer reviewed then what you say is invalid'....I don't need to m8. You've either lived it or you haven't. The opinion is based on an individuals perception, who has been doing it a fair old while and has also discussed it with other individuals who have also been doing it a fair old while and a certain view has been derived.
Old 16th August 2021
  #29
Lives for gear
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Aoharukano ➡️
I feel like I'm stuck in a loophole of watching tutorials, have I been wasting my time?.
I feel like I'm stuck in a loophole of replying to threads o gear space, have I been wasting my time?

Old 16th August 2021
  #30
Here for the gear
 
🎧 5 years
I think this is my first message on Gearsl... Gearspace after being a member for almost ten years and here is what I have to say: find friends to jam and improvise/compose with. Learn in the process and have fun. Remember that anything is possible. You learned as much as you could. Now, forget about it.
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