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Why do so many samples of chords exist?
Old 2 weeks ago | Show parent
  #61
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bgood's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Methlab ➡️
So if we actually play the chord and then sample ourselves to achieve a certain effect in a sampler, is that ok?

Just trying to make sure I don't offend the “im a real musician!” music gods (typically boomers who play tired blues covers in front of 15 drunk people).
Yah... if that makes you feel better about not learning how to play an instrument... sure

It’s like a poet who doesn’t bother to learn how to read, right or speak... and then lash out when called out lol
Old 2 weeks ago | Show parent
  #62
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🎧 15 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by bgood ➡️
Yah... if that makes you feel better about not learning how to play an instrument... sure

It’s like a poet who doesn’t bother to learn how to read, right or speak... and then lash out when called out lol
Except i have played an instrument professionally for most of my life. In studio and as a touring artist for majors and indies. I probably have a much better resume than you. I just am not a boomer clown who thinks playing guitar is such a big deal.

So try again big guy.
Old 2 weeks ago
  #63
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🎧 5 years
@ bgood people are happy to forget thanks to instant gratification via MIDI chord packs, etc. that music is a language and they are happy to be illiterate. I ain't fine with being illiterate musically in the context of the music I wish to, want to and will make and don't plan on taking the chord pack(s) route.
Old 2 weeks ago
  #64
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🎧 5 years
@ Methlab the people who know something's not a big deal don't make it such and it's called appearing effortless.
Old 2 weeks ago
  #65
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Quantum7's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
My feelings on sample chord libraries.... well, my mom always told me that, “If you don’t have something nice to say, don’t say anything at all.” OK then, I've got nothing to say.
Old 2 weeks ago | Show parent
  #66
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🎧 15 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by boombapdame ➡️
@ Methlab the people who know something's not a big deal don't make it such and it's called appearing effortless.
Agree. I just ignored the guy. Not worth talking to someone like that.
Old 2 weeks ago | Show parent
  #67
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bgood's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Methlab ➡️
Except i have played an instrument professionally for most of my life. In studio and as a touring artist for majors and indies. I probably have a much better resume than you. I just am not a boomer clown who thinks playing guitar is such a big deal.

So try again big guy.
Cool story. Your resume sounds inspiring. It’s clearly instilled a real sense of love of craft and humility
Old 2 weeks ago | Show parent
  #68
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Gringo Starr's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by golden beers ➡️
worked for these guys
Such a fantastic song. And everything didn't need to be drenched in reverb because the composition was solid.
Old 2 weeks ago
  #69
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cogsy's Avatar
 
🎧 5 years
Chord samples are just another tool in the toolbox or color in your palette. It's about what captures the right vibe for your song. No one who's listening cares how you played it, only whether it sounds good or not. You don't get points for how hard you worked to make it.
Old 2 weeks ago | Show parent
  #70
Gear Maniac
 
Some folks don’t have skills to play chords.
Old 2 weeks ago | Show parent
  #71
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happyham's Avatar
 
🎧 5 years
I fairly often chuck my chord progression, because detuned samples on Wavasaur sound better.
Old 2 weeks ago | Show parent
  #72
Gear Head
 
Go back to the early days of dance music and rave culture. It was kids in bedrooms with trackers (which were much more established than you make out, Amiga games all music was trackers, mod scene early Drum n Bass was full of people using them ) or very small amounts of 2nd hand ‘pro gear’. Think an 8 track hardware sequencer or an Atari ST , may be a synth, an FX unit a sampler of some description, say Akai s900 and record it live through a 12 channel mixer straight to tape or DAT. In that setup there’s a limit as to where and how chords can be played. Synth is the obvious choice but it may not be multitimbral, and may already be doing the Bass. So you have the sampler, which if it’s an early one would only work on one midi channel (or that’s what you’d limit yourself to because of the limited sequencer tracks). So you’d spread the Few samples (Very little sample ram) out across one Set of keys.

Also the influence was there from early pioneers and it became a stylistic thing that became part of the genre. A chord stab played up and down the keyboard sounds very different to a single note being played as chords. Then came the very first sample CDs like Zero G Datafile one and Technotrance, Datafile was full of rips from records, Technotrance had newly created stuff, so people who didn’t own ‘synth x’ and just had a sampler (the TT samples often were layered up as well) could access those sounds and stabs and so it evolved.

It’s part of ‘the sound‘ and the culture and to question why it exists ‘because I can play an 11th chord on my £3000 synth and you can’t’ is pretty ignorant. All of those ‘stupid’ ‘non musicians’ created a whole culture, many music styles, scenes, a whole industry of of club nights, festivals and events from their back bedrooms using next to no equipment. What have you created? In music absolutely no-one cares how educated or clever you are. Usually by trying to show how you are endowed in those areas and belittle others you only display how dumb you can be.
Old 2 weeks ago
  #73
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sin night's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
The "sampled chords" may have started out of necessity (because of limitations on the avaible technology), but then they evolved into their own thing.


Talking about playing skills (or lack of them), I remember when I started making music with a pc in the early 2000s and I was 15-17. I had a pc with a SoundBlaster Live and a very generous amount of ram for the time, so polyphony was not an issue. I wasn't a good keyboard player (and I'm still not a good player nowadays, but I try...), but I knew how to build chords and I could draw them quite easily in the piano roll of Cubasis VST. I could write anything: major, minor, 7th, inversions, whatever voicing I wanted... You can guess my frustation everytime I loaded a soundfont (or an early vst plugin patch) with a built in chord and I felt very limited in what I could play. Then you can also guess my frustation when I couldn't get the same results by playing the chords in the traditional way with a standard patch: they didn't sound "right", like in the music I was listening...

Nowadays, I still have a love-hate relationship with them and I still try to avoid them because of the limitations on what I can play... but sometimes they are just what's needed to get a certain result, so I use them anyway, regardless of the limitations.

It has nothing to do with what I can play (or write with a pianoroll ); if anything, in my experience they make it harder to make something decent because there's no control over the voicing and I'm stuck with transposing the same intervals up and down (or maybe I would have to combine more patches, for example a minor and a major patch, to get a traditional chord progression)... maybe it's my mindset, but I'm way faster at programming a chord progression on a pianoroll than building it with sampled chords. It would never ever come to my mind to use them for this task (unless I'm forced to use them because of technical limitations, and I'd highly hate it).

Speaking of skills, I think that programming music on a tracker is harder than learning how to build basic chords and progressions (I tried using Buzz in the early 2000s and writing sequences was a mental task in comparison to writing with a pianoroll or playing notes on a midi keyboard). Building chords and progression is not that difficult; once you know the intervals between the notes of a chord, it's all a matter of counting (which is something you should be able to do, if you're using a tracker) and avoid any note out of the scale (which you either learn quickly or you just recognise as "wrong sounding" once you play the sequence).
I think it's harder to input notes on a tracker, where you're required to translate them to numbers (maybe even in hex format), that's one of the most un-musical way of writing in my opinion, you miss all (or almost all) of the visual reference provided by a piano roll or by a score; I think it's closer to computer programming (in assembly).


In my opinion sampled chords are really a thing on their own and nowadays they have a place because of the way they sound and because they are part of the aesthetic/language of certain music styles... I think it's all about options, not lack of skills.

Last edited by sin night; 2 weeks ago at 01:53 PM.. Reason: fixed grammar mistakes
Old 2 weeks ago | Show parent
  #74
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Monotremata's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by nunrgguy ➡️

It’s part of ‘the sound‘ and the culture and to question why it exists ‘because I can play an 11th chord on my £3000 synth and you can’t’ is pretty ignorant. All of those ‘stupid’ ‘non musicians’ created a whole culture, many music styles, scenes, a whole industry of of club nights, festivals and events from their back bedrooms using next to no equipment. What have you created? In music absolutely no-one cares how educated or clever you are. Usually by trying to show how you are endowed in those areas and belittle others you only display how dumb you can be.
The rock dinosaurs are mad they have to struggle to get gigs at local dive bars and play crappy blues covers, where DJs can easily out bank anyone just playing a party..
Old 2 weeks ago | Show parent
  #75
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cogsy's Avatar
 
🎧 5 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by sin night ➡️
Nowadays, I still have a love-hate relationship with them and I still try to avoid them because of the limitations on what I can play... but sometimes they are just what's needed to get a certain result, so I use them anyway, regardless of the limitations.

It has nothing to do with what I can play (or write with a pianoroll ); if anything, in my experience they make it harder to make something decent because there's no control over the voicing and I'm stuck with transposing the same intervals up and down (or maybe I would have to combine more patches, for example a minor and a major patch, to get a traditional chord progression)... maybe it's my mindset, but I'm way faster at programming a chord progression on a pianoroll than building it with sampled chords. It would never ever come to my mind to use them for this task (unless I'm forced to use them because of technical limitations, and I'd highly hate it).
I don't disagree with you. I could play chords live faster and easier than monkeying around with samples, but you couldn't pay me enough to draw in notes on a piano roll. I think that's the interesting thing about sampled chords. It lends the style a robotic quality because there are no "lazy" chords where notes are keyed a little early or late. It feels almost hypnotic to have that degree of perfection.

The challenge then comes from limiting yourself to the palette of chord voicings. What voicings do you *really* need if you are limited to 16 trigger pads? Since you can't just do it live, more thought and planning goes into that aspect. Like you said, maybe that's what gets you a certain result.
Old 2 weeks ago
  #76
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Synthpark's Avatar
 
2 Reviews written
🎧 5 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alien23 ➡️
Relative to the more "traditional" waveshapes, I've long been a fan of sample based Osc.
Much more complex wave shapes for oscillator use readily available and assured stable tuning to boot.
But I've never understood having samples of "chords"......
It ruins being able to use the sample as an osc that can be played across the entire range and locks one into a world of playing in 5ths, 9ths, and such things.

None the less, there's tons of them out there.
What's the point?
The concept is that many people have no clue about music theory. They happily fire off chord samples. And even if you don't need these, just playing a jazz chord in strange transposition can sound very original
Old 1 week ago | Show parent
  #77
Gear Head
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Monotremata ➡️
The rock dinosaurs are mad they have to struggle to get gigs at local dive bars and play crappy blues covers, where DJs can easily out bank anyone just playing a party..
They were mad thirty years ago with the ‘its not music, the machines do it all blah blah and I’m worried I won’t get gigs anymore playing Tornadoes covers’. That the same arguments are still being made to this day on a music tech forum of all things is jus bizarre.
I WAS ‘classically trained’ i.e. I did know how to play 13ths and 7b5 blah blah, it took YEARS to unlearn it and to learn that if you want to make banging dance tracks you need to make them as simple as possible, but getting the feel and the attitude right is actually damn difficult, there is actually a real art to it, just not the traditional one of spanking off a piece of timber or twinkling up and down on a keyboard.
I think the irony is perhaps also lost on the OP that s/he is going through samples that someone else has created in the first place? Hear a sample you like and think you have a use for it? Cool, use it. Find a sample you can’t find a use for? Leave it alone then, no need to go on the internet and moan about it. There are no bad sounds/samples, only ones you don’t know how to use yet.

Want to hear a soft, insipid, chin stroking, self indulgent piece of drivel? Get a ‘musician’ to drop a straight, no feel, straight out of the machine, 4 on the floor 909 beat and play all his fancy changes, modulations and twiddles all over it. Play it out in a club. Watch the floor clear before your very eyes.
Old 1 week ago | Show parent
  #78
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Gringo Starr's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Many years ago I thought learning harmony would somehow constrict my creative wings, take the wind out of my sails and ultimately castrate my creative force. Bullllllshiiiiiit!!!! Complete and total delusional nonsense. Learning the very basics of harmony will not stifle someones creativity. If it does then the gift of creativity probably wasn't in abundance in the first place.

You can learn harmony and still use chord samples. The only difference is that you might use them better.


Quote:
Originally Posted by nunrgguy ➡️
Want to hear a soft, insipid, chin stroking, self indulgent piece of drivel? Get a ‘musician’ to drop a straight, no feel, straight out of the machine, 4 on the floor 909 beat and play all his fancy changes, modulations and twiddles all over it. Play it out in a club. Watch the floor clear before your very eyes.
Could you post an example of an electronic music track created by someone with musical knowledge that is a soft, insipid, chin stroking, self indulgent piece of drivel with fancy changes and modulations? I would love to hear that. And then please post a banging track of yours that came into existence after you carefully unlearned your classical training? I would love to hear that as well.
Old 1 week ago
  #79
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I think the reason is to be able to keep them for prosperity to stop them from becoming extinct. Like collecting seeds and putting in cryo. storage.
Old 1 week ago | Show parent
  #80
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🎧 10 years
The use of chords may have come out of necessity. It was not only trackers, but most samplers had quite limited polyphony. Akai S950 for example offered 8 individual outputs, but they were all monophonic. So if you wanted to create a reggae guitar progression you sampled various chord samples and combined them in a new way. A lot of producers at that time had very limited setups. Samplers, ram memory and magnetic storage with the exception of diskettes were all incredibly pricey.

The samples on X-Static Goldmines etc. were at least partly sampled from records. They're already heavily processed and eq'd and if you wanted a certain sound, getting a sample was the quickest and easiest way to do it. Even SoundBlasters and Gravis Ultrasound sound cards had soundfonts, multisampled instruments with "high fidelity", but when producing underground music you never wanted that sound.
Old 1 week ago | Show parent
  #81
Gear Head
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by coffee ➡️
The use of chords may have come out of necessity. It was not only trackers, but most samplers had quite limited polyphony. Akai S950 for example offered 8 individual outputs, but they were all monophonic. So if you wanted to create a reggae guitar progression you sampled various chord samples and combined them in a new way. A lot of producers at that time had very limited setups. Samplers, ram memory and magnetic storage with the exception of diskettes were all incredibly pricey.

The samples on X-Static Goldmines etc. were at least partly sampled from records. They're already heavily processed and eq'd and if you wanted a certain sound, getting a sample was the quickest and easiest way to do it. Even SoundBlasters and Gravis Ultrasound sound cards had soundfonts, multisampled instruments with "high fidelity", but when producing underground music you never wanted that sound.
Yup, exactly what I said/meant the s900 might have had a stereo out as well, it’s 35 years ago I can’t remember, But If it did I can’t remember if you could assign separately to the individual outs from the stereo Or if everything went through that as well anyway. Datafile one came out before Xstatic for sure. I rinsed both of em to death.
Old 1 week ago | Show parent
  #82
Gear Head
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gringo Starr ➡️
Many years ago I thought learning harmony would somehow constrict my creative wings, take the wind out of my sails and ultimately castrate my creative force. Bullllllshiiiiiit!!!! Complete and total delusional nonsense. Learning the very basics of harmony will not stifle someones creativity. If it does then the gift of creativity probably wasn't in abundance in the first place.

You can learn harmony and still use chord samples. The only difference is that you might use them better.




Could you post an example of an electronic music track created by someone with musical knowledge that is a soft, insipid, chin stroking, self indulgent piece of drivel with fancy changes and modulations? I would love to hear that. And then please post a banging track of yours that came into existence after you carefully unlearned your classical training? I would love to hear that as well.
I could do that yes, I’ve got about 100 released tracks on Discogs but I prefer to stay anonymous on forums thx. I also said that I do know about melody and harmony, I even taught it for three years in a college and teach the rudiments to my private students ������

I’ll edit and also say I don’t disagree with your first para.

I don’t need to post any music by anyone....

Blues, I want stomping down homie blues with guts, attitude and drive. Now what’s going to create that? Musically. Is it going to be simple instrumentation, drones, basic 1-4-5s, 12 bar structure and a guy/gal who’s able to scream out their inner pain at the top of her/his lungs etc or is it going to be virtuoso playing, clever transpositions, modulations, extended chords and beautiful harmonies etc etc.? You know the answer. Sure you start doing some of that you might create something interesting and new, no problem with that at all but it ain’t the blues no more and if your audience want blues and you don’t give them blues they walking.

You don’t seem to understand the culture behind this at all.
Why don’t you find me a piece of hardcore techno that’s got ‘lashings of music theory’ applied in its creation, other than maybe inadvertently. Generally, apart from music styles that rely on it, the evolvement/creation of something comes first, the theory comes after, and its that, a theory to try and describe how something ‘works’. But to make something that ‘works’ in art, while it can be useful, it is not necessary, and the theory only describes raw nuts and bolts pertaining to western ideas of harmony, melody and structure. It can’t tell you anything about how/why synth sound A blends with sample B and when played at the speed in this pattern it makes a crowd on Mandy dance their tits off.

Thinking of something really really commercial that came from ‘the scenes’, go away and listen to the first two Prodigy albums. Then something by some early rave acts like Acen etc, then understand that sample CDs came into existence to satisfy a certain market and you’ll understand that the requirements of ‘musos’ have got nothing to do with it. You can play chords?. Great. Go play chords. Now try to make some Shranz. Oops you can’t can you because you’ve put harmony and melody in it, that ain’t Shranz, that’s Trance. I didn’t come here for German marching music. Get outta here!
Old 1 week ago | Show parent
  #83
Gear Maniac
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by WozNYC ➡️
This thread is so silly and close-minded.
Even super musicians like YES used chord samples in their music as far back as 1983.

Listen to the first 20 seconds of "Owner Of A Lonely Heart."

As they say "there's always an exception to the rule" and your example is a good one !

But I'd bet my bottom dollar that the vast majority of these sample packs are being used by clueless so called musicians.
Old 1 week ago | Show parent
  #84
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WozNYC's Avatar
 
🎧 5 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by CAL. ➡️

I'd bet my bottom dollar that the vast majority of these sample packs are being used by clueless so called musicians.
That's like saying the vast majority of people that buy guitars will put them aside
after a month when they realize they can't play.

You could say the same about people that buy basketballs. It's a given.

New Order used a chord sample of Kraftwerk's Uranium on Blue Monday
in 1982 and it went on to be the best selling 12" in history.
Old 1 week ago | Show parent
  #85
Gear Head
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by CAL. ➡️
As they say "there's always an exception to the rule" and your example is a good one !

But I'd bet my bottom dollar that the vast majority of these sample packs are being used by clueless so called musicians.
I can bet my bottom dollar the vast majority of these Montages and Integras are being purchased by clueless piano players who have no idea how to programme a single patch on them.

They should put them on the market with no presets, them let’s see how these so-called musicians get on....
Old 1 week ago | Show parent
  #86
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Gringo Starr's Avatar
 
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by nunrgguy ➡️
I could do that yes, I’ve got about 100 released tracks on Discogs but I prefer to stay anonymous on forums thx. I also said that I do know about melody and harmony, I even taught it for three years in a college and teach the rudiments to my private students ������

I’ll edit and also say I don’t disagree with your first para.

I don’t need to post any music by anyone....

Blues, I want stomping down homie blues with guts, attitude and drive. Now what’s going to create that? Musically. Is it going to be simple instrumentation, drones, basic 1-4-5s, 12 bar structure and a guy/gal who’s able to scream out their inner pain at the top of her/his lungs etc or is it going to be virtuoso playing, clever transpositions, modulations, extended chords and beautiful harmonies etc etc.? You know the answer. Sure you start doing some of that you might create something interesting and new, no problem with that at all but it ain’t the blues no more and if your audience want blues and you don’t give them blues they walking.

You don’t seem to understand the culture behind this at all.
Why don’t you find me a piece of hardcore techno that’s got ‘lashings of music theory’ applied in its creation, other than maybe inadvertently. Generally, apart from music styles that rely on it, the evolvement/creation of something comes first, the theory comes after, and its that, a theory to try and describe how something ‘works’. But to make something that ‘works’ in art, while it can be useful, it is not necessary, and the theory only describes raw nuts and bolts pertaining to western ideas of harmony, melody and structure. It can’t tell you anything about how/why synth sound A blends with sample B and when played at the speed in this pattern it makes a crowd on Mandy dance their tits off.

Thinking of something really really commercial that came from ‘the scenes’, go away and listen to the first two Prodigy albums. Then something by some early rave acts like Acen etc, then understand that sample CDs came into existence to satisfy a certain market and you’ll understand that the requirements of ‘musos’ have got nothing to do with it. You can play chords?. Great. Go play chords. Now try to make some Shranz. Oops you can’t can you because you’ve put harmony and melody in it, that ain’t Shranz, that’s Trance. I didn’t come here for German marching music. Get outta here!
I don't understand the culture behind this at all? You seem to make a lot of assumptions and generalizations. I asked you to post an example because you were the one that defined a quality of a song that comes with musical training. I'd simply like to know what electronic song from a trained musician you think has those qualities. As far as you not wanting to post a song of your own to stay anonymous I understand that.

My idea is simply this... It seems like once the genres of popular music that we're most familiar with pass a few decades of their development that it desparately needs artists that try to do new things and push the boundaries to prevent stagnation. Sure at some point so many artists have done their own things and it's not easy to push the boundaries or come up with something fresh but that doesn't mean people shouldn't try.

The idea is that you have untypical ideas that don't sound untypical because they're properly executed. To have complexity sprinkled on top simplicity but without it feeling complex. You learn the rules so you can break the rules and make things more interesting. There are geniuses who don't need training and are capable of phenomenal compositions but 99.999% of musicians are not musical geniuses.

I totally agree with you that the theory should come after the creation. IMO that's when knowing harmony becomes a weapon. When you can create something from your soul and then step back, look at it and start to experiment with focus and knowledge. That's when very interesting things can be discovered.
Old 1 week ago | Show parent
  #87
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enossified's Avatar
 
1 Review written
🎧 10 years
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alien23 ➡️
The thing about music "theory" is that it's all just a bunch of ideas some thought "might" be useful.

How Academics and Scholastics ever managed to pass any of it off as "law" may remain a mystery.
Ooh, this is getting good!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gringo Starr ➡️
I totally agree with you that the theory should come after the creation.
That's where theory came from in the first place...analyzing "standard musical practice" well after the fact. Even jazz theory.



Old 1 week ago | Show parent
  #88
Gear Head
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gringo Starr ➡️
I don't understand the culture behind this at all? You seem to make a lot of assumptions and generalizations. I asked you to post an example because you were the one that defined a quality of a song that comes with musical training. I'd simply like to know what electronic song from a trained musician you think has those qualities. As far as you not wanting to post a song of your own to stay anonymous I understand that.

My idea is simply this... It seems like once the genres of popular music that we're most familiar with pass a few decades of their development that it desparately needs artists that try to do new things and push the boundaries to prevent stagnation. Sure at some point so many artists have done their own things and it's not easy to push the boundaries or come up with something fresh but that doesn't mean people shouldn't try.

The idea is that you have untypical ideas that don't sound untypical because they're properly executed. To have complexity sprinkled on top simplicity but without it feeling complex. You learn the rules so you can break the rules and make things more interesting. There are geniuses who don't need training and are capable of phenomenal compositions but 99.999% of musicians are not musical geniuses.

I totally agree with you that the theory should come after the creation. IMO that's when knowing harmony becomes a weapon. When you can create something from your soul and then step back, look at it and start to experiment with focus and knowledge. That's when very interesting things can be discovered.
I am making some assumptions but you referring to songs does imply you don’t understand the culture. Sample CDs started as part of rave culture. Rave culture is, in the main, nothing to do with songs. I use generalisations to attempt to explain ideas and concepts, as almost anyone does. Another generalisation. The world isn’t black and white, there are certainly dance tracks that have been made via ‘application of theory’. My students do it. That’s not what I wrote. I said get a muso, and I mean any and by muso I mean a real, non programmer, non DJ, college trained muso and get him/her to apply their so-called superior music knowledge to do something they essentially know nothing about, only perhaps their theoretical analysis and then without a doubt they will attempt to apply their wider musical knowledge to it. I know this because I’ve seen it again and again with players that try to programme. I’m not saying they can’t make decent music but I am saying they absolutely cannot make a killer dance track ‘just like that’ even if all they’re doing is chucking samples from a pack in , than a DJ can pick up a guitar with no prior experience and play like Rory Gallagher . It is NOT as simple as people imagine. Making a piece of really really bad dance music is very very easy. Which is why making very very good dance music is actually extremely difficult.

What is a ‘trained musician’ seriously? Find one and ask him to produce a piece of Drum n Bass and present it on DOA. If he has no experience of DnB I can almost guarantee there may be a few ‘has potential’ but absolutely no-one is going to ‘wow AMAZE’ because while the ‘trained musician’ may know something about melody, harmony etc etc, he’ll know nought about Jungle, Drum n Bass, he won’t know what makes a DnB floor go off, he wont know about DnB sound design, mixing techniques (absolutely nothing like rock, pop, whatever). Just as daft to ask the DnB producer to make a piece of orchestral music. Neither one is invalid, it’s just all ‘my music is better than your music’ bollocks.
Old 1 week ago | Show parent
  #89
Lives for gear
 
🎧 10 years
Apparently Melodyne can transpose individual notes in a chord sample. Although I haven't tried it myself, I hear you can unglue them that way. We can probably expect the quality
of results to keep improving as the technology progresses. Maybe we'll miss those previous limitations when they're gone
Old 1 week ago | Show parent
  #90
Gear Maniac
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by WozNYC ➡️
That's like saying the vast majority of people that buy guitars will put them aside
after a month when they realize they can't play.

You could say the same about people that buy basketballs. It's a given.

New Order used a chord sample of Kraftwerk's Uranium on Blue Monday
in 1982 and it went on to be the best selling 12" in history.
New order example is as I say "exception to the rule" and I'm sure you could think of another 50

Your other examples are not the same. We're talking about a specific product that's made for a select group of people who want to create music.

Not the same as buying a guitar or basketball for your kids to encourage them to try something new, or the adult who's likes a new experience etc

Can I ask you ???

Who in your opinion is the main group of people that purchase sample packs ? or another way of putting it, who are the manufacturers aiming their product at ?
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